Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Insurance  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 28.10.2011, 00:22
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Winterthur
Posts: 80
Groaned at 11 Times in 5 Posts
Thanked 32 Times in 11 Posts
ruskasinthehouse is considered unworthyruskasinthehouse is considered unworthyruskasinthehouse is considered unworthy
Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Hi

Pregnancy causes hormonal changes that increase your risk of developing gum disease. Has anyone experienced this? My mother lost several teeth during her pregnancy. My wife has teeth problems and I fear pregancy might make it worse. Are these problems covered in the insurace (I know dental is separate) as these were caused by pregnancy? anyone with similar experience? advice?

Regards
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 28.10.2011, 00:25
Sbrinz's Avatar
RIP
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Murten - Morat
Posts: 11,866
Groaned at 563 Times in 354 Posts
Thanked 11,548 Times in 5,941 Posts
Sbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Maybe you can ask your insurance company? I think it might be, with restrictions.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 28.10.2011, 00:35
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Zurich
Posts: 137
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 40 Times in 24 Posts
Powerlauer has no particular reputation at present
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

I had a nightmare with my teeth, but I am insured separately for my teeth, but still paid 20%!

I suggest she gets regular check ups, go to the hygienist, check she doesn't have a jaw problem (that's what I had, I wasn't grinding I was biting) causing me phantom tooth ache. It was a horror, just get a good dentist! If it's not too late, check out how much insurance is!

Also, floss!! I was advised to get a philips sonic are, best thing ever! But get advise from the hygienist. I go to dr George sirtus, he is based in town, zurich.

I hope this information doesn't stress you out too much!

Good luck with it all!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 28.10.2011, 00:36
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zurich Oberland
Posts: 523
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 470 Times in 239 Posts
woolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputation
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post
Hi

Pregnancy causes hormonal changes that increase your risk of developing gum disease. Has anyone experienced this? My mother lost several teeth during her pregnancy. My wife has teeth problems and I fear pregancy might make it worse. Are these problems covered in the insurace (I know dental is separate) as these were caused by pregnancy? anyone with similar experience? advice?

Regards
The compulsory pregnancy coverage that you don't have to pay your excess on is very strictly defined and only covers pregnancy check-ups, scans, birth, 10days post natal care, 3 lactation consultant visits, an amount towards pre natal classes, and maybe one or two other things. It does not cover any other illnesses or conditions that fall outside these specific things, even if they are directly caused by pregnancy. However some insurance policies have more generous cover and you haven't said if you have supplementary cover, so as the OP said, you'll need to ask your insurance co.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 28.10.2011, 02:22
Captain Greybeard's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sarganserland / NW Lower Penin
Posts: 3,518
Groaned at 43 Times in 37 Posts
Thanked 7,410 Times in 2,314 Posts
Captain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post
Pregnancy causes hormonal changes that increase your risk of developing gum disease. Has anyone experienced this? My mother lost several teeth during her pregnancy. My wife has teeth problems and I fear pregancy might make it worse. Are these problems covered in the insurace (I know dental is separate) as these were caused by pregnancy? anyone with similar experience? advice?

Regards
Quite exactly as you put it, pregnancy-induced hormonal changes increase the risk of developing gum disease. However, they do not cause the disease. The disease (known as gingivitis, possibly periodontitis) is caused by bacteria, which can be easily kept at bay by thorough oral hygiene.

There are several reasons why the gums are more prone to bleeding and other problems during pregnancy, but all of them can be prevented by proper cleaning. There is one very rare exception that I've never seen in reality, called pregnancy epulis, a swelling of the gums that can occur during pregnancy but abates after birth. It may be sensitive but is harmless.

No matter what you heard or read, the harsh truth is, there is no serious problem if the level of oral hygiene is suffient during pregnancy and was already before. No insurance will pay because it's a home-made problem. If in doubt, your wife should have her gums professionally checked.

There are lots of myths around pregnancy and teeth. The scientific reality is fairly simple.
__________________

"This is AMAZING! I have the exact amount of money Joe Biden has cost us playing golf in my sweatpants pocket!" Kona Lowell

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Captain Greybeard for this useful post:
  #6  
Old 29.10.2011, 00:20
little_isabella's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,094
Groaned at 18 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 1,387 Times in 550 Posts
little_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Not sure I agree with the comments in this thread about hygiene being the only determinant of oral health during pregnancy. The hormonal changes in pregnancy cause gums to swell, plus immune system changes leave women far more susceptible to tooth decay. Add in vomiting from morning sickness and tooth erosion can be tough to prevent. Plus, high hormonal levels can affect the ligaments and bones supporting your teeth, which can = loose teeth (not relating to gum disease).
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 29.10.2011, 00:24
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lovely Alsace
Posts: 137
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 91 Times in 52 Posts
ng1412 has made some interesting contributions
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

I had really bad bleeding gums throughout pregnancy and then as soon as I had given birth it just stopped overnight. Was scary at the time but I was assured it was hormonal and would go once I had my baby which it did!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank ng1412 for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 29.10.2011, 00:49
Captain Greybeard's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sarganserland / NW Lower Penin
Posts: 3,518
Groaned at 43 Times in 37 Posts
Thanked 7,410 Times in 2,314 Posts
Captain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post
Not sure I agree with the comments in this thread about hygiene being the only determinant of oral health during pregnancy. The hormonal changes in pregnancy cause gums to swell, plus immune system changes leave women far more susceptible to tooth decay. Add in vomiting from morning sickness and tooth erosion can be tough to prevent. Plus, high hormonal levels can affect the ligaments and bones supporting your teeth, which can = loose teeth (not relating to gum disease).
Morning sickness causing gagging probles: yes. Needs a lot of good will to overcome but is feasible. Gums swell: yes. Even increased tendency to bleed while brushing, no doubt, but if properly brushed all the same that's not a real problem.

The immune system has very, very little to do with tooth decay. If the immune system were affected by pregnancy to a degree that increases caries, pregnant women would have to spend the entire pregnancy at an isolation ward. Higher caries incidence during pregnancy is caused by reduced brushing due to fear of bleeding (which actually is harmless but a sign that better hygiene is needed).

I've never heard of a significant hormonal influence on the connective tissue between the roots and the bone. I've seen hundreds of women through pregnancy and have not found a single case of such a phenomenon. Not a single tooth (of thousands!) was damaged, let alone lost. Sorry, no.

Pregnancy renders gums prone to bleeding while brushing. Pregnant woman fears blood, hence doesn't brush properly, maybe to a certain degree also because of vomiting problems. Bacteria proliferate, bleeding increases, brushing definitely goes down the drain. Bacteria invade the narrow gap between bone and roots, destroy the connective tissue and after some time also the bone. Result: loose teeth. Blame hormones, although they are only one of many factors.

Additional scenario: Bacteria multiply like mad because of influences mentioned above. Pregnant woman may also develop strange cravings. It's not always gurkins and the like, it may be on the sweet side just as well, very often and very much so. Even without additional sugar, the bacteria still have enough sacharides to produce ample amounts of sugar acids, which attack the hard substances of the teeth. Result: immensely increased caries. Blame hormones, see above. Real cause: lack of knowledge causing wrong behavior.

A huge lot of research supports my professional experience of almost 40 years. I do not agree with everything science tells me, but in this field I do.
__________________

"This is AMAZING! I have the exact amount of money Joe Biden has cost us playing golf in my sweatpants pocket!" Kona Lowell

Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Captain Greybeard for this useful post:
  #9  
Old 29.10.2011, 10:56
little_isabella's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,094
Groaned at 18 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 1,387 Times in 550 Posts
little_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post
Morning sickness causing gagging probles: yes. Needs a lot of good will to overcome but is feasible.
Good will? Please elaborate. Because at 17 weeks now, I've tried every suggestion (doctor or otherwise) in the book and I'm still sick 24/7.

Quote:
View Post
Gums swell: yes. Even increased tendency to bleed while brushing, no doubt, but if properly brushed all the same that's not a real problem.
So why are my gums bleeding when I've never had a cavity and pretty much have a movie-star smile (straight, white teeth)? I still brush after meals with an ultra-soft regular toothbrush and an electric one for sensitive teeth, plus flossing. My gums started to get sore around a month into pregnancy and now I've got aching teeth and my jaw feels sore sometimes too. Never before have I ever had bleeding gums.

Quote:
The immune system has very, very little to do with tooth decay.
Reference please. I see otherwise. See Am FamPhysician (2008). Oral health during pregnancy: 77 (8): 1139-1144.

"During pregnancy, gingivitis is aggravated by fluctuations in estrogen and progesterone levels in combination with changes in oral flora and a decreased immune response."

I'm not saying good oral hygiene doesn't reduce the risk. I am saying it doesn't eliminate it and all the good oral hygiene in the world isn't stopping my gums and mouth from being sore. I've even checked with a dentist and was told it's normal, still no cavities and I should feel better after I give birth.

Quote:
If the immune system were affected by pregnancy to a degree that increases caries, pregnant women would have to spend the entire pregnancy at an isolation ward.
Lol, dramatic much?

Quote:
Higher caries incidence during pregnancy is caused by reduced brushing due to fear of bleeding (which actually is harmless but a sign that better hygiene is needed).
Reference please.

Quote:
I've never heard of a significant hormonal influence on the connective tissue between the roots and the bone. I've seen hundreds of women through pregnancy and have not found a single case of such a phenomenon. Not a single tooth (of thousands!) was damaged, let alone lost. Sorry, no.
Gotta luv people basing opinions on anecdotal experiences...

See Scheutz et al. Motherhood and dental disease (2002) Community Dent Health: 19(2): 67–72.

"Teeth can loosen during pregnancy, even in the absence of gum disease, because of increased levels of progesterone and estrogen affecting the periodontium (i.e., the ligaments and bone that support the teeth)."

Quote:
Pregnancy renders gums prone to bleeding while brushing.
Agreed.

Quote:
Pregnant woman fears blood, hence doesn't brush properly, maybe to a certain degree also because of vomiting problems.
Pregnant women fear blood? Reference please.

Quote:
Bacteria proliferate, bleeding increases, brushing definitely goes down the drain. Bacteria invade the narrow gap between bone and roots, destroy the connective tissue and after some time also the bone. Result: loose teeth. Blame hormones, although they are only one of many factors.
Come again? You just disagreed above with "I've never heard of a significant hormonal influence on the connective tissue between the roots and the bone."

Quote:
Blame hormones, see above. Real cause: lack of knowledge causing wrong behavior.
You've yet to show me one solid piece of evidence refuting anything I've said. I think that telling women that dental problems result from a lack of knowledge is a superficial approach and ignores all the evidence I've just presented to you.

You have shown some serious misinformation and lack of knowledge yourself. Again, see my references. I totally agree that there must be education, especially in the sense that women who already had poor oral hygiene are now potentially going to suffer more problems during pregnancy.

But women with otherwise excellent hygiene habits can still suffer problems and it's flat out incorrect to suggest that it's all their doing.

Quote:
A huge lot of research supports my professional experience of almost 40 years. I do not agree with everything science tells me, but in this field I do.
Please show some science then, because all I see are blatant, extreme statements of opinion. I'd like to see some of this research please, especially since the research I've quoted disputes some of your points.

Last edited by little_isabella; 29.10.2011 at 11:02. Reason: Fixed a word.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank little_isabella for this useful post:
  #10  
Old 29.10.2011, 11:04
little_isabella's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,094
Groaned at 18 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 1,387 Times in 550 Posts
little_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post
I had really bad bleeding gums throughout pregnancy and then as soon as I had given birth it just stopped overnight. Was scary at the time but I was assured it was hormonal and would go once I had my baby which it did!
Good to know. This makes me feel a bit better. My gums have been bleeding a little for the last few months and feel irritated. My dentist gave me the same advice too about it going away after I give birth. Hope so!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 29.10.2011, 11:16
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post
So why are my gums bleeding when I've never had a cavity and pretty much have a movie-star smile (straight, white teeth)? I still brush after meals with an ultra-soft regular toothbrush and an electric one for sensitive teeth, plus flossing. My gums started to get sore around a month into pregnancy and now I've got aching teeth and my jaw feels sore sometimes too. Never before have I ever had bleeding gums.
Sounds like you are over doing the dental hygiene to the point of trauma injury. Constantly attacking your teeth with brushes (sensitive or otherwise) is bound to cause damage if your gums are sensitive and tender during pregnancy.

Why don't you just chew gum after a meal and keep the brushing to morning and evening to give them some time to recover?

I continued with my normal dental hygiene (i.e. brushing twice a day and flossing in the evening) and never had any problems after the pregnancy with tooth loss or cavities.

I guess if you are eating a corrosive diet you would need to take care but common-sense should tell you that a normal balanced diet which is low on sugar and acid shouldn't need such a brutal dental hygiene regime.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 29.10.2011, 11:16
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,471
Groaned at 17 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 1,996 Times in 1,189 Posts
CH_Me has a reputation beyond reputeCH_Me has a reputation beyond reputeCH_Me has a reputation beyond reputeCH_Me has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post

So why are my gums bleeding when I've never had a cavity and pretty much have a movie-star smile (straight, white teeth)? I still brush after meals with an ultra-soft regular toothbrush and an electric one for sensitive teeth, plus flossing. My gums started to get sore around a month into pregnancy and now I've got aching teeth and my jaw feels sore sometimes too. Never before have I ever had bleeding gums.
You shouldn't be brushing after meals - you are rubbing the acid from your food into your gums and teeth enamel. I get sore gums and my hygienist said I was brushing too much. Waiting an hour after eating is better. I was also given a paste to rub into my gums that stops the redness.

My gums did get worse in pregnancy and I made sure I had a dental checkup as part of my planning to try to get pregnant and I did my normal yearly dental checkup and hygienist appointment while pregnant. With morning sickness you should never brush straight after but rinse and a while before brushing due to the acidity.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank CH_Me for this useful post:
  #13  
Old 29.10.2011, 11:26
little_isabella's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,094
Groaned at 18 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 1,387 Times in 550 Posts
little_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
Sounds like you are over doing the dental hygiene to the point of trauma injury. Constantly attacking your teeth with brushes (sensitive or otherwise) is bound to cause damage if your gums are sensitive and tender during pregnancy.

Why don't you just chew gum after a meal and keep the brushing to morning and evening to give them some time to recover?

I continued with my normal dental hygiene (i.e. brushing twice a day and flossing in the evening) and never had any problems after the pregnancy with tooth loss or cavities.

I guess if you are eating a corrosive diet you would need to take care but common-sense should tell you that a normal balanced diet which is low on sugar and acid shouldn't need such a brutal dental hygiene regime.
Why brutal? I'm brushing about three times a day, gently but thoroughly. Initially I tried lots of small meals for the morning sickness, with just rinsing after but it has been really bad so mealtime is reduced for now. I can't chew gum because 1. It makes my stomach more nauseous and 2. I'm sensitive to artificial sweeteners, plus sugar gums would just exacerbate the problem unfortunately. =(

For me, virtually all food makes me feel sick so after eating anything - if I want it to stay down I have to get the taste of it out of my mouth.

Quote:
You shouldn't be brushing after meals - you are rubbing the acid from your food into your gums and teeth enamel. I get sore gums and my hygienist said I was brushing too much. Waiting an hour after eating is better. I was also given a paste to rub into my gums that stops the redness.
I've been told to rinse only after vomiting but to brush gently after meals. Although I'm mostly eating well, I've had times where the only thing I can eat is a frozen lolly because as soon as I put anything else even near my mouth, it brings up food. The doctor says that it's better to get some calories than no calories.

Can you please share the brand of paste that was recommended? Would really appreciate the tip. Thanks so much.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 29.10.2011, 11:37
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
View Post
Why brutal?
Because of what you say here...

Quote:
View Post
So why are my gums bleeding when I've never had a cavity and pretty much have a movie-star smile (straight, white teeth)? I still brush after meals with an ultra-soft regular toothbrush and an electric one for sensitive teeth, plus flossing. My gums started to get sore around a month into pregnancy and now I've got aching teeth and my jaw feels sore sometimes too. Never before have I ever had bleeding gums.
Maybe if you've had work done to give you a "movie-star" smile, that coupled with the current pregnancy could have rendered you with extra sensitive gums and over-brushing is further irritating them.

There are some interesting tips here that might help you, too.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 29.10.2011, 11:48
little_isabella's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,094
Groaned at 18 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 1,387 Times in 550 Posts
little_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond reputelittle_isabella has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Quote:
Because of what you say here...
I guess I just don't see how it's brutal. I always use an electric toothbrush to clean the backside of my teeth as I find it hard with a regular one. Then, I clean the front and remaining areas with a regular one. Floss once a day and use a tongue scraper. I understand 3x a day is more than perhaps the usual 2x, but wouldn't have considered that extra brushing as brutal.

Quote:
Maybe if you've had work done to give you a "movie-star" smile, that coupled with the current pregnancy could have rendered you with extra sensitive gums and over-brushing is further irritating them.
I had braces twenty years ago. That's it. Just really dedicated oral hygiene, which kicked in once I liked the look of my teeth after braces. Lol, childhood brushing was another story entirely. ;p

Quote:
There are some interesting tips here that might help you, too.
Wonderful, thanks. I never imagined pregnancy would be so...challenging. I kept hearing how morning sickness usually subsided by 12 weeks but I have been unlucky in this regard. All these other crazy symptoms like the bleeding gums..etc. All worth it in the end though!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank little_isabella for this useful post:
  #16  
Old 29.10.2011, 13:57
Captain Greybeard's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sarganserland / NW Lower Penin
Posts: 3,518
Groaned at 43 Times in 37 Posts
Thanked 7,410 Times in 2,314 Posts
Captain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Dental problems due to pregnancy?

Isabella, I was about to write an extensive answer to your reply to my previous post. However, after reading your post a bit more carefully, I decided to ignore this thread in the future. Congratulations, you just ousted one of the very few, if not the only professional in this field on EF.

I absolutely understand your concerns, and I appreciate your attempts to gather useful information, but I cannot stand the way you ridicule a whole branch of science and make fun of the fact that my conclusions drawn from said science enabled me to get hundreds of women through pregnancy without the loss of a single tooth, without even a single gingival pocket, just some bleeding that could be easily kept at bay and abated after birth.

It's my job, and I've been very successfully doing this for almost 40 years. Calling that experience of mine "anecdotal" is an affront. Several hundred cases without an exception are not anecdotal.

The references you provide are based on fundamental misunderstanding of some simple facts every dentist knows but most GPs totally fail to comprehend. Don't expect an MD to know much more about periodontology and cariology than an ambulance driver or a midwife. I very much respect those folks but that kind of knowledge is not their business, and it often shows.

All your objections could be easily dismantled, references included, thousands of them. In the course of four decades in this trade, I collected several hundred books and several thousand magazines that cover this topic, but since you did not even properly read my post, let alone try to understand what I wrote, I'm not going to waste any more time. Sorry.

I dislike the way you treat me just because I had the cheek to point out a few very popular (also among MD's!) misconconceptions that cause a lot of damage and could be easily avoided. Nevertheless, I would like to ask you to go on brushing your teeth very carefully despite the bleeding. Forget the acid thing for a while, that's yet another misconception, understandable, correct in certain cases but wrong most of the time.

Just do what ng1412 obviously did: Don't be afraid of the bleeding. That's the hormonal part, besides the gagging. It's frequent and per se harmless. I do not want you to run into troubles just because you p1ssed me off to a degree where I refuse to cooperate.

Please brush your teeth as well as possible despite the bleeding. Thoroughly brushed gums generally are much healthier than those just tickled by a brush. Bleeding must not discourage but encourage you. However, brushing three times a day is another old and obstinate misconception debunked already decades ago, although true in certain cases. But please don't ask me for details; you can always find some sources that say otherwise. Internet-based half-knowledge is one of the biggest challenges to modern medicine.

I wish you all the best for the rest of your pregnancy and a lot of joy with the little one. I'm sure your bleeding gums will heal after giving birth, provided you really keep them clean until then. Take care.
__________________

"This is AMAZING! I have the exact amount of money Joe Biden has cost us playing golf in my sweatpants pocket!" Kona Lowell

Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Captain Greybeard for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Former President Bush's trip to CH cancelled due to protests. eddiejc1 International affairs/politics 14 07.02.2011 23:21
Fuel problems in France due to Strikes John.. International affairs/politics 39 31.10.2010 13:23
Help!Due to relocate to Zurich area!! claire1978 Introductions 3 31.07.2010 10:04
Contract obligations if had to leave country due to visa expiry Indianguy Permits/visas/government 11 19.06.2009 01:31
dental problems akshata Family matters/health 8 31.12.2008 20:43


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:29.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0