Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Off-Topic > Off-Topic > International affairs/politics  
View Poll Results: What would you personally prefer to happen?
I want the UK to stay in an ever-closer union 49 23.11%
I want the UK to stay in a loosely connected EU 68 32.08%
I want the UK out because the EU is bad for the UK 22 10.38%
I want the UK out because the EU is a bad thing 23 10.85%
I want the UK out because this would be good for the rest of us 17 8.02%
I don't really care 33 15.57%
Voters: 212. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #14361  
Old 28.10.2018, 23:02
Jim2007's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Kt. Bern
Posts: 4,280
Groaned at 115 Times in 98 Posts
Thanked 5,026 Times in 2,375 Posts
Jim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
A speech from Alice Weidel in German with English subtitles, at least someone understands the problems of the EU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNh3312dTtA
The usual BS! On the day DC made the announcement of the referendum he was warned by the then Irish PM that he should not for a minute except that an other EU head of state would agree to any agreement that would in any way disadvantage the EU or their country. He when on to point out that each of the other heads of states would have to go before their own electorate and that there were not many votes in giving the UK a good deal if they or the EU were seen to be the looser.

It is pure stupidity to think a position of straight can come from walking away from trade deals that cover 90% of your exports and trying to renegotiate them, when everyone and his mother knows you desperately need the deals. This has now been compounded by the 20 or so objections at the WTO. Good luck to Liam Fox trying to reach agreement with Russia and Argentina on that one.

And anyone that thinks for a minute that the US will behave any differently when it is their turn is fooling yourself because there is no way Trump will agree to any deal that does no favor the US and paint him the winner. You only have to look at the replacement for the open skies deal they are offering to see how well it favors US airlines.
__________________
"There is no passion to be found playing small - in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living." - Nelson Mandela
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Jim2007 for this useful post:
  #14362  
Old 29.10.2018, 10:18
marton's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kt. Zürich
Posts: 10,685
Groaned at 356 Times in 307 Posts
Thanked 14,024 Times in 7,714 Posts
marton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
The usual BS! On the day DC made the announcement of the referendum he was warned by the then Irish PM that he should not for a minute except that an other EU head of state would agree to any agreement that would in any way disadvantage the EU or their country. He when on to point out that each of the other heads of states would have to go before their own electorate and that there were not many votes in giving the UK a good deal if they or the EU were seen to be the looser.

It is pure stupidity to think a position of straight can come from walking away from trade deals that cover 90% of your exports and trying to renegotiate them, when everyone and his mother knows you desperately need the deals. This has now been compounded by the 20 or so objections at the WTO. Good luck to Liam Fox trying to reach agreement with Russia and Argentina on that one.

And anyone that thinks for a minute that the US will behave any differently when it is their turn is fooling yourself because there is no way Trump will agree to any deal that does no favor the US and paint him the winner. You only have to look at the replacement for the open skies deal they are offering to see how well it favors US airlines.
Difficult to see a decent way forward on the WTO issue!

Someone wrote here that in such circumstances countries continue working as if the old agreement was in place until there is a new one.

Difficulty here is the EU is so large. Imagine that an agreement exists that a country can export 100,000 tons of meat to the EU duty free; allowing such a huge quantity into the UK might wipe out UK farmers.
Reply With Quote
  #14363  
Old 29.10.2018, 11:15
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 18,045
Groaned at 288 Times in 237 Posts
Thanked 15,588 Times in 8,671 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Difficult to see a decent way forward on the WTO issue!

Someone wrote here that in such circumstances countries continue working as if the old agreement was in place until there is a new one.

Difficulty here is the EU is so large. Imagine that an agreement exists that a country can export 100,000 tons of meat to the EU duty free; allowing such a huge quantity into the UK might wipe out UK farmers.
No reason to protect farmers or anyone for that matter.
Reply With Quote
  #14364  
Old 29.10.2018, 11:18
RufusB's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In my head. And UK. Ex-Basel.
Posts: 3,699
Groaned at 64 Times in 59 Posts
Thanked 6,062 Times in 2,425 Posts
RufusB has a reputation beyond reputeRufusB has a reputation beyond reputeRufusB has a reputation beyond reputeRufusB has a reputation beyond reputeRufusB has a reputation beyond reputeRufusB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
I was replying about Eton as you will have read, so no relevance to my answer.


As a teacher you must accept that the answer is based on the question or topic being discussed. Taking things out of context again is pathetic.

Eton has no shareholders, if you read what I am replying to you should not be confused.
So you say. However I was specifically referring to your charitable status comment, which is why I only quoted that bit of your post. Nothing taken out of context. As a graduate lit student.... it's something I know how to do. Be specific. You're merely choosing to see it that way. Not sure why you continue to attempt to limit and define me by my profession but if that makes you feel better, have at it. As for the name-calling... grow up a little, eh? You're often presenting opinion as fact. Btw, not "only" a teacher. Not that it really matters in the grand scheme of things.


Re public school scholarships and bursaries... very few and far between and "hardship" grants are usually in the hundreds rather than thousands of pounds. Still makes most UK public (private) schools inaccessible to all but the wealthiest families.

But we digress again.

Last edited by RufusB; 29.10.2018 at 21:45. Reason: Typo
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank RufusB for this useful post:
  #14365  
Old 29.10.2018, 12:13
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Zurich
Posts: 205
Groaned at 13 Times in 11 Posts
Thanked 256 Times in 137 Posts
John William has earned the respect of manyJohn William has earned the respect of manyJohn William has earned the respect of many
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

My suggestion to UKIP & UKIP MEP's for their final weeks appearance in the European Parliament.

Just thought I would share this suggestion that I've posted on the UKIP party website and no doubt
repeated amongst UKIP MEP's.

Hi,

No doubt UKIP MEP's will be getting many suggestions about what to say, do and wear during
your final weeks of attending the European Parliament but TOP OF MY LIST of suggestions and no doubt
repeated by many others is:
Please, please, please can all UKIP MEP's attend the European Parliament, dressed as Cavaliers of the
English Civil War period; in order to add substance to the Brexiteer nickname, you've acquired over the
years, during the run up to the British Referendum of the EU and of course for the past couple of years,
following the Referendum and the count down to Brexit.

As I'm sure that you will no doubt agree with me that, this would be a true reflection of UKIP's
Cavalier attitude to the European Parliament and it's institutions, over the many years
you have been in the EU, before you leave.
Reply With Quote
  #14366  
Old 29.10.2018, 12:48
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
The usual BS! On the day DC made the announcement of the referendum he was warned by the then Irish PM that he should not for a minute except that an other EU head of state would agree to any agreement that would in any way disadvantage the EU or their country. He when on to point out that each of the other heads of states would have to go before their own electorate and that there were not many votes in giving the UK a good deal if they or the EU were seen to be the looser.

It is pure stupidity to think a position of straight can come from walking away from trade deals that cover 90% of your exports and trying to renegotiate them, when everyone and his mother knows you desperately need the deals. This has now been compounded by the 20 or so objections at the WTO. Good luck to Liam Fox trying to reach agreement with Russia and Argentina on that one.

And anyone that thinks for a minute that the US will behave any differently when it is their turn is fooling yourself because there is no way Trump will agree to any deal that does no favor the US and paint him the winner. You only have to look at the replacement for the open skies deal they are offering to see how well it favors US airlines.
This is only because the EU is so inflexible, which will ultimately be its undoing. Let's not forget that David Cameron went to the EU with some perfectly reasonable and sensible reforms and got humiliated. Indeed, the only answer that ever gets parroted when EU faces instability is "MORE EUROPE".

What the UK is now proposing in terms of Chequers, had it been offered by any other developed nation like Australia or Japan: Unilateral acceptance of goods standards, acceptance of labour law, acceptance of environmental policy, contributions to EU defence etc. etc. would have been accepted in an instant by the EU. The EU won't accept it with the UK though because they want to set a precedent to prevent other countries from leaving. This makes striking a deal now very unlikely. It's remarkable that the EU are that pig headed and are happy to hang Ireland out to dry just to make this point.

Last edited by Loz1983; 29.10.2018 at 14:36.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #14367  
Old 29.10.2018, 12:52
StirB's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,410
Groaned at 141 Times in 123 Posts
Thanked 5,937 Times in 2,552 Posts
StirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Let's not forget that David Cameron went to the EU with some perfectly reasonable and sensible reforms and got humiliated.
Well you know what they say about doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results...
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank StirB for this useful post:
  #14368  
Old 29.10.2018, 13:01
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Küsnacht, Switzerland
Posts: 4,066
Groaned at 87 Times in 81 Posts
Thanked 8,256 Times in 3,838 Posts
Blueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
No reason to protect farmers or anyone for that matter.
I suggest that you have a good read of the facts and come back with ideas how to grow the exports to non EU to compensate the massive loss in trade.

Name:  foodexport.JPG
Views: 167
Size:  65.1 KB

https://www.fdf.org.uk/exports/ukexports-2018.aspx
Reply With Quote
  #14369  
Old 29.10.2018, 13:22
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 18,045
Groaned at 288 Times in 237 Posts
Thanked 15,588 Times in 8,671 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
So you say. However I was specifically referring to your charitable status comment, which is why I only quoted that bit if your post. Nothing taken out of context. As a graduate lit student.... it's something I know how to do. Be specific. You're merely choosing to see it that way. Not sure why you continue to ]attempt to limit and define me by my profession but if that makes you feel better, have at it. As for the name-calling... grow up a little, eh? You're iften presenting opinion as fact. Btw, not "only" a teacher. Not that it really matters in the grand scheme of things.


Re public school scholarships and bursaries... very few and far between and "hardship" grants are usually in the hundreds rather than thousands of pounds. Still makes most UK public (private) schools inaccessible to all but the wealthiest families.

But we digress again.
Certainly not true at Millfield, historically the school with the highest fees. It was quite normal in the 70's for the son of a King to share a dormitory with the son of a coal miner. Not sure the equivalent today as the traditional poor all seem to own cars.
Reply With Quote
  #14370  
Old 29.10.2018, 13:23
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 18,045
Groaned at 288 Times in 237 Posts
Thanked 15,588 Times in 8,671 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Well you know what they say about doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results...
HaHa like a second referendum
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank fatmanfilms for this useful post:
  #14371  
Old 29.10.2018, 13:28
StirB's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,410
Groaned at 141 Times in 123 Posts
Thanked 5,937 Times in 2,552 Posts
StirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
HaHa like a second referendum
Very good
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank StirB for this useful post:
  #14372  
Old 29.10.2018, 13:49
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Küsnacht, Switzerland
Posts: 4,066
Groaned at 87 Times in 81 Posts
Thanked 8,256 Times in 3,838 Posts
Blueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Not sure the equivalent today as the traditional poor all seem to own cars.
Wow!

When I was 'poor', yet in full time work, I saved up all my pennies for 2yrs and bought a Clio on Ebay for £272. By poor I mean, after travel to work costs (employer subsidised train pass), bills and legal fees (I was going through a divorce at the time), my total budget for food and household items was £50 per month. (I'm the freakin' queen of making a dozen dishes from tinned tomatoes, onions and garlic. ) That was 2009 and the Clio lasted me for 2yrs.
Reply With Quote
  #14373  
Old 29.10.2018, 14:03
StirB's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,410
Groaned at 141 Times in 123 Posts
Thanked 5,937 Times in 2,552 Posts
StirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Not sure the equivalent today as the traditional poor all seem to own cars.
Less than 60% do, it turns out. As opposed to around 80% (avg) of the rest of the income brackets...

https://www.statista.com/statistics/...-uk-by-income/
Reply With Quote
  #14374  
Old 29.10.2018, 14:20
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Zurich
Posts: 205
Groaned at 13 Times in 11 Posts
Thanked 256 Times in 137 Posts
John William has earned the respect of manyJohn William has earned the respect of manyJohn William has earned the respect of many
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Certainly not true at Millfield, historically the school with the highest fees. It was quite normal in the 70's for the son of a King to share a dormitory with the son of a coal miner. Not sure the equivalent today as the traditional poor all seem to own cars.

No doubt the modern day equivalent would be the son of a notorious Brexiteer like Jacob Rees-Mogg
sharing a dormitory with the son of a notorious Remainer.
Reply With Quote
  #14375  
Old 29.10.2018, 14:58
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 18,045
Groaned at 288 Times in 237 Posts
Thanked 15,588 Times in 8,671 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Less than 60% do, it turns out. As opposed to around 80% (avg) of the rest of the income brackets...

https://www.statista.com/statistics/...-uk-by-income/
60% is the vast majority, significantly higher than voted leave. The difference between rich & poor is surprisingly small IMHO.

What percentage of people in Zurich own a car probably less than 60% as the rich can't afford to learn to drive in CH
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank fatmanfilms for this useful post:
  #14376  
Old 29.10.2018, 15:16
StirB's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,410
Groaned at 141 Times in 123 Posts
Thanked 5,937 Times in 2,552 Posts
StirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
60% is the vast majority, significantly higher than voted leave. The difference between rich & poor is surprisingly small IMHO.

What percentage of people in Zurich own a car probably less than 60% as the rich can't afford to learn to drive in CH
If I hadn't learned to drive in the UK, I doubt I would have bothered here. As far as driving a car is concerned, it is ALWAYS quicker to cycle to any destination in the city and public transport is so good, that it is ALWAYS more convenient than driving. I doubt that can be said about any town or city in the UK.


Depending on how you define rich and poor I guess. Is a "rich" guy earning £200k / year who owns a £1m house with a £800k mortgage better off than a poor person who is renting? Chances are, if they both lose their job, the "rich" guy will suffer more financially. I think you therefore have to define "rich" as somebody who is able to live a good lifestyle independent of gainful employment, as anyone who isn't in that category is only a few paychecks away from insolvency.
Obviously here, with the excellent unemployment situation, it is far less stressful and it takes a lot less to be considered "rich" in my opinion.
Reply With Quote
  #14377  
Old 29.10.2018, 17:12
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 18,045
Groaned at 288 Times in 237 Posts
Thanked 15,588 Times in 8,671 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
If I hadn't learned to drive in the UK, I doubt I would have bothered here. As far as driving a car is concerned, it is ALWAYS quicker to cycle to any destination in the city and public transport is so good, that it is ALWAYS more convenient than driving. I doubt that can be said about any town or city in the UK.


Depending on how you define rich and poor I guess. Is a "rich" guy earning £200k / year who owns a £1m house with a £800k mortgage better off than a poor person who is renting? Chances are, if they both lose their job, the "rich" guy will suffer more financially. I think you therefore have to define "rich" as somebody who is able to live a good lifestyle independent of gainful employment, as anyone who isn't in that category is only a few paychecks away from insolvency.
Obviously here, with the excellent unemployment situation, it is far less stressful and it takes a lot less to be considered "rich" in my opinion.
Poor people in the UK in the 60's were terribly thin & looked 15 years older than someone the same age today. They dreamed of owning a car but probably smoked cigarettes.
Anyone who is a home owner must be in the 'relatively well off category' certainly not poor. Many people live above their means, regardless of salary, many celebrities die insolvent. Most lottery winners have run out of money within 5 years as they spend the capital rather than the income.
Quote:
View Post
Wow!

When I was 'poor', yet in full time work, I saved up all my pennies for 2yrs and bought a Clio on Ebay for £272. By poor I mean, after travel to work costs (employer subsidised train pass), bills and legal fees (I was going through a divorce at the time), my total budget for food and household items was £50 per month. (I'm the freakin' queen of making a dozen dishes from tinned tomatoes, onions and garlic. ) That was 2009 and the Clio lasted me for 2yrs.
Were you a home owner or joint home owner at the time?
Reply With Quote
  #14378  
Old 29.10.2018, 17:16
StirB's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,410
Groaned at 141 Times in 123 Posts
Thanked 5,937 Times in 2,552 Posts
StirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond reputeStirB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
Poor people in the UK in the 60's were terribly thin & looked 15 years older than someone the same age today. They dreamed of owning a car but probably smoked cigarettes.
Anyone who is a home owner must be in the 'relatively well off category' certainly not poor.
But I thought the 60s were great, everyone had a job for life and even the local chimney sweep could afford his own 4 bedroom mansion?
Reply With Quote
  #14379  
Old 29.10.2018, 17:43
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 18,045
Groaned at 288 Times in 237 Posts
Thanked 15,588 Times in 8,671 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
But I thought the 60s were great, everyone had a job for life and even the local chimney sweep could afford his own 4 bedroom mansion?
The 60's were a fabulous time, food rationing ended in 1955. Fairly full employment with huge austerity, it took to Mrs Thatcher being elected in 1979 before the country could take off due to her cutting the top rate of taxation for investment income from 98% to 40% in 2 years. Employees earning over £10,000 paid @50% tax, earn over £23,000 you paid tax @83%. There were virtually zero rich people in the UK before 1979, in any case you could not take more than £600 out of the UK so no possibility to leave & take your money with you.
Reply With Quote
  #14380  
Old 29.10.2018, 18:12
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 18,045
Groaned at 288 Times in 237 Posts
Thanked 15,588 Times in 8,671 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

It's strange nobody bothered to mention the UK budget. The UK is booming! growth targets being raised. Personal allowance & higher rate tax threshold promises 1 year only, whats not to like?
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...18-at-a-glance
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
europe




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 11 (2 members and 9 guests)
amogles
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Latest Referendum, what will be consequences for EU (C permit and B permit) holders? expat2014 Permits/visas/government 3 11.02.2014 07:59
Importing vehicles and the VAT consequences in Switzerland from France BEFO Finance/banking/taxation 6 07.08.2013 14:11
The (Available in CH) Dog Food Review Thread meloncollie Pet corner 44 08.05.2012 19:15
Common-law marriage and consequences in CH Mishto Family matters/health 9 01.10.2011 21:03
Something for the Brits: M&S in CH mark Daily life 11 15.11.2007 11:18


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 15:40.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0