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Guest 20.02.2016 09:30

Umberto Eco
 
The celebrated and accomplished Italian scholar, philosopher and revered writer Umberto Eco has died on Friday.

Foucault's Pendulum is one of my all time favourite books. The Name of the Rose, his best known novel, brought him international fame.

In a recent 2015 interview he is quoted as saying:

"I think an author should write what the reader does not expect. The problem is not to ask what they need, but to change them to produce the kind of reader you want for each story.

One of Italy's greats - a professor, who only wrote on weekends. Rest in peace.

meloncollie 20.02.2016 09:51

Re: Umberto Eco
 
More sad news from the literary world.

Sheer coincidence, but I just started reading 'The Book Of Legendary Lands' yesterday. Typically Eco, a charming 'travelogue of the mind'.

Looking at my collection of his works, which is by no means even close to complete, I am again amazed at how he effortlessly moves through genres, spans such a wide range of interests with seeming ease. He must have been a fascinating person to chat with.

A voice that will be much missed.

Guest 20.02.2016 09:54

Re: Umberto Eco
 
Oh I loved Name of the Rose and Foucault's Pendulum blew me away...

Such sad news.

greenmount 20.02.2016 09:57

Re: Umberto Eco
 
R.I.P., Umberto Eco.
You brought so much joy to millions of people all over the world with your books. You were loved.


I was really sad when I read the news, it feels like an old family member is gone.

Guest 20.02.2016 10:46

Re: Umberto Eco
 
S. Rushdie literary review slated Eco's F. Pendulum when the book came out. Eco seemed to love the fact that the literary world could make head nor tail of him. And his academic peers must have tsk tsk'd him many a time over the years for writing these novels.. can just imagine all the bitching and frowning that went on in the academic halls of Italy.

Loved him. A unique rebel and a lover all things cultural no matter how small or trivial.

Funny as Eco's F. Pendulum and Rushdie's Midnight Children would be two of my top ten books of all time.

To kill a Mockingbird: No. 1 - naturally ;)

FrankZappa 20.02.2016 11:01

Re: Umberto Eco
 
Sad indeed. The name of the Rose is one of my favorites, but I gave up on Foucalt's pendulum after a few pages. I just didn't get it at all. The only other book of his that I have is "Mouse or Rat?" a lovely little tome about the challenges of translation. Goodbye to a literary giant.

Guest 20.02.2016 12:23

Re: Umberto Eco
 
The sad news of Harper Lee and Umberto Eco made me think of..

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there; I did not die.

by Mary Elizabeth Frye - a Baltimore housewife.

greenmount 20.02.2016 12:36

Re: Umberto Eco
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Swisstree (Post 2540852)
Loved him. A unique rebel and a lover all things cultural no matter how small or trivial.

Indeed.
He was a very complex writer and not always easy to read (although well worth the effort), but how deliciously funny, ironic and bitter on the same time in his articles on contemporary world's issues. Nothing was too insignificant for him, he was interested in everything. For those who didn't do it yet, I highly recommend one of his books which is actually a collection of articles published in the '80s in L'Espresso and gathered later on in the book "La bustina di Minerva" (I obviously read a translation of it and am sorry I don't know the name of it in English)
The last book that I read by him, not very long time ago, was History of beauty. It is the kind of book you always wish to come back to for one reference or another.
I avoid making lists with favourite books, but if I had to I would definitely add The name of the rose and Foucault's Pendulum.

khoreutees 20.02.2016 13:27

Re: Umberto Eco
 
Very sad news indeed.
I always meant to read more of his work, particularly the non-fiction, than the pieces I picked up by chance.

Guest 20.02.2016 18:31

Re: Umberto Eco
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FrankZappa (Post 2540860)
Sad indeed. The name of the Rose is one of my favorites, but I gave up on Foucalt's pendulum after a few pages. I just didn't get it at all. The only other book of his that I have is "Mouse or Rat?" a lovely little tome about the challenges of translation. Goodbye to a literary giant.





It's definitely not an easy read - I restarted it numerous times. And I had to have a dictionary by the side of me when I was reading it! And I Googled stuff. Definitely not a light read, but still somehow fabulous.

MusicChick 20.02.2016 18:41

Re: Umberto Eco
 
Oh no. RIP. One of my favorites.

6 Walks walked me through many years of reading lists. He was a true, genuine methodologist. Without rubbing it in, unconstructively, he believed in the power the adventurous and poetic enough cognition.


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