Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Off-Topic > Off-Topic > International affairs/politics  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #141  
Old 16.08.2021, 15:08
komsomolez's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: SZ
Posts: 3,504
Groaned at 325 Times in 227 Posts
Thanked 7,149 Times in 3,039 Posts
komsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Similar in the Koran
Let us not start with quotes in the Bible or the Quran please that allegedly demonstrate what peaceful religions they are: (1) There are plenty of opposite examples in the text. (2) Actions speak louder than words.

Last edited by komsomolez; 16.08.2021 at 16:48. Reason: Language
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank komsomolez for this useful post:
  #142  
Old 16.08.2021, 15:12
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 17,414
Groaned at 685 Times in 533 Posts
Thanked 26,558 Times in 10,707 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
So it doesn't state anywhere in the link that the Muslims polled are only those "who believe sharia law comes from God himself." - you admit you invented that entirely. Classic.
Sorry, it came from another pewforum survey, with the same graphic as the one you posted and at a quick glance, it looks like the same report so let's agree, if your source is okay for your slant on things then the same source must be okay for mine.

Here's what it says:

Quote:
According to the survey findings, most Muslims believe sharia is the revealed word of God rather than a body of law developed by men based on the word of God. Muslims also tend to believe sharia has only one, true understanding, but this opinion is far from universal; in some countries, substantial minorities of Muslims believe sharia should be open to multiple interpretations. Religious commitment is closely linked to views about sharia: Muslims who pray several times a day are more likely to say sharia is the revealed word of God, to say that it has only one interpretation and to support the implementation of Islamic law in their country.

Although many Muslims around the world say sharia should be the law of the land in their country, the survey reveals divergent opinions about the precise application of Islamic law.14 Generally, supporters of sharia are most comfortable with its application in cases of family or property disputes. In most regions, fewer favor other specific aspects of sharia, such as cutting off the hands of thieves and executing people who convert from Islam to another faith.
Link

I'd say that reading the rest, many Muslims are quite open-minded with many believing that Sharia law was developed by men rather than actually being the word of God.

I can't recall any Christians, anywhere, saying that the bible is in fact a rather dull book of nonsensical fiction written by a load of men who wanted the lands ruled in the way they wanted and writing the 'rule book' seemed the best way to control the masses.

Isn't that basically what the Judaism, Christianity and Islamic religions were originally all about anyway?
Reply With Quote
  #143  
Old 16.08.2021, 15:20
gaburko's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: BL
Posts: 1,149
Groaned at 201 Times in 146 Posts
Thanked 3,855 Times in 1,422 Posts
gaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Heartbreaking scenes at Kabul airport of people surrounding military cargo plane and running along trying to enter while some of them hang onto the wheels.
Heartbreaking and yet....cant help but keep asking myself how the hell in a country of almost 40m, the circa 120-200k Taliban are completely unchecked. There's a great deal of truth that the nations that deserve their freedom are the nations that fight for it. Imposing "freedom" will always be seen as an imperialist intervention.
Reply With Quote
The following 5 users would like to thank gaburko for this useful post:
  #144  
Old 16.08.2021, 15:21
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 17,414
Groaned at 685 Times in 533 Posts
Thanked 26,558 Times in 10,707 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Heartbreaking scenes at Kabul airport of people surrounding military cargo plane and running along trying to enter while some of them hang onto the wheels.

An Apache helicopter flies around them to make them go away so plane can take off.

The C-5 finally is in the air and bodies start to fall from the air.
Is this the 1% ? Is everyone else cheering the Taliban? No, didn't think so.
Reply With Quote
  #145  
Old 16.08.2021, 15:30
V__'s Avatar
V__ V__ is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 1,511
Groaned at 384 Times in 215 Posts
Thanked 2,082 Times in 866 Posts
V__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Heartbreaking and yet....cant help but keep asking myself how the hell in a country of almost 40m, the circa 120-200k Taliban are completely unchecked. There's a great deal of truth that the nations that deserve their freedom are the nations that fight for it. Imposing "freedom" will always be seen as an imperialist intervention.
Absolutely. I have no sympathy for people who don't stand for their country. They had 7 times more people and latest weapons yet they didn't even want to fight some bunch with Soviet weapons and knifes.

When the Yugoslav army conquered 2/3 of Croatia and Slovenia, they were armed with tanks, latest military jets and they were fighting hunter's clubs associations with rifles and Molotov cocktails. Yet they overcame because they were united against an occupying force.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank V__ for this useful post:
  #146  
Old 16.08.2021, 15:39
V__'s Avatar
V__ V__ is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 1,511
Groaned at 384 Times in 215 Posts
Thanked 2,082 Times in 866 Posts
V__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond reputeV__ has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Is this the 1% ? Is everyone else cheering the Taliban? No, didn't think so.
Everyone else had their chance for freedom but didn't do anything for it.

All I see on this airport are young men who chose the easy way out rather to fight for their country. The USA made them collaborators on a hostile territory overnight. The US chose to evacuate the sniff dogs first and leave the locals. Maybe they hoped it will be them to hang the "mission accomplished" sign?


__________________
"FAQ is not binding."
Reply With Quote
  #147  
Old 16.08.2021, 16:12
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: SG
Posts: 10,126
Groaned at 589 Times in 427 Posts
Thanked 13,646 Times in 7,098 Posts
Urs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Here's the entire thing for the subsahara countries (p. 11 from this report), there's very little difference between the Christians and the Muslims:

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Urs Max for this useful post:
  #148  
Old 16.08.2021, 16:22
FCBarca's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La Côte
Posts: 1,527
Groaned at 141 Times in 78 Posts
Thanked 1,750 Times in 802 Posts
FCBarca has a reputation beyond reputeFCBarca has a reputation beyond reputeFCBarca has a reputation beyond reputeFCBarca has a reputation beyond reputeFCBarca has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

I go back to the 'might is right' doctrine of US imperialism that Howard Zinn wrote about in 2008:

With an occupying army waging war in Iraq and Afghanistan, with military bases and corporate bullying in every part of the world, there is hardly a question any more of the existence of an American Empire. Indeed, the once fervent denials have turned into a boastful, unashamed embrace of the idea.

However, the very idea that the United States was an empire did not occur to me until after I finished my work as a bombardier with the Eighth Air Force in the Second World War, and came home. Even as I began to have second thoughts about the purity of the “Good War,” even after being horrified by Hiroshima and Nagasaki, even after rethinking my own bombing of towns in Europe, I still did not put all that together in the context of an American “Empire.”

I was conscious, like everyone, of the British Empire and the other imperial powers of Europe, but the United States was not seen in the same way. When, after the war, I went to college under the G.I. Bill of Rights and took courses in U.S. history, I usually found a chapter in the history texts called “The Age of Imperialism.” It invariably referred to the Spanish-American War of 1898 and the conquest of the Philippines that followed. It seemed that American imperialism lasted only a relatively few years. There was no overarching view of U.S. expansion that might lead to the idea of a more far-ranging empire — or period of “imperialism.”

I recall the classroom map (labeled “Western Expansion”) which presented the march across the continent as a natural, almost biological phenomenon. That huge acquisition of land called “The Louisiana Purchase” hinted at nothing but vacant land acquired. There was no sense that this territory had been occupied by hundreds of Indian tribes which would have to be annihilated or forced from their homes — what we now call “ethnic cleansing” — so that whites could settle the land, and later railroads could crisscross it, presaging “civilization” and its brutal discontents.

Neither the discussions of “Jacksonian democracy” in history courses, nor the popular book by Arthur Schlesinger Jr., The Age of Jackson, told me about the “Trail of Tears,” the deadly forced march of “the five civilized tribes” westward from Georgia and Alabama across the Mississippi, leaving 4,000 dead in their wake. No treatment of the Civil War mentioned the Sand Creek massacre of hundreds of Indian villagers in Colorado just as “emancipation” was proclaimed for black people by Lincoln’s administration.

That classroom map also had a section to the south and west labeled “Mexican Cession.” This was a handy euphemism for the aggressive war against Mexico in 1846 in which the United States seized half of that country’s land, giving us California and the great Southwest. The term “Manifest Destiny,” used at that time, soon of course became more universal. On the eve of the Spanish-American War in 1898, the Washington Post saw beyond Cuba: “We are face to face with a strange destiny. The taste of Empire is in the mouth of the people even as the taste of blood in the jungle.”

The violent march across the continent, and even the invasion of Cuba, appeared to be within a natural sphere of U.S. interest. After all, hadn’t the Monroe Doctrine of 1823 declared the Western Hemisphere to be under our protection? But with hardly a pause after Cuba came the invasion of the Philippines, halfway around the world. The word “imperialism” now seemed a fitting one for U.S. actions. Indeed, that long, cruel war — treated quickly and superficially in the history books — gave rise to an Anti-Imperialist League, in which William James and Mark Twain were leading figures. But this was not something I learned in university either.

The “Sole Superpower” Comes into View

Reading outside the classroom, however, I began to fit the pieces of history into a larger mosaic. What at first had seemed like a purely passive foreign policy in the decade leading up to the First World War now appeared as a succession of violent interventions: the seizure of the Panama Canal zone from Colombia, a naval bombardment of the Mexican coast, the dispatch of the Marines to almost every country in Central America, occupying armies sent to Haiti and the Dominican Republic. As the much-decorated General Smedley Butler, who participated in many of those interventions, wrote later: “I was an errand boy for Wall Street.”

At the very time I was learning this history — the years after World War II — the United States was becoming not just another imperial power, but the world’s leading superpower. Determined to maintain and expand its monopoly on nuclear weapons, it was taking over remote islands in the Pacific, forcing the inhabitants to leave, and turning the islands into deadly playgrounds for more atomic tests.

In his memoir, No Place to Hide, Dr. David Bradley, who monitored radiation in those tests, described what was left behind as the testing teams went home: “[R]adioactivity, contamination, the wrecked island of Bikini and its sad-eyed patient exiles.” The tests in the Pacific were followed, over the years, by more tests in the deserts of Utah and Nevada, more than a thousand tests in all.

When the war in Korea began in 1950, I was still studying history as a graduate student at Columbia University. Nothing in my classes prepared me to understand American policy in Asia. But I was reading I. F. Stone’s Weekly. Stone was among the very few journalists who questioned the official justification for sending an army to Korea. It seemed clear to me then that it was not the invasion of South Korea by the North that prompted U.S. intervention, but the desire of the United States to have a firm foothold on the continent of Asia, especially now that the Communists were in power in China.

Years later, as the covert intervention in Vietnam grew into a massive and brutal military operation, the imperial designs of the United States became yet clearer to me. In 1967, I wrote a little book called Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal. By that time I was heavily involved in the movement against the war.

When I read the hundreds of pages of the Pentagon Papers entrusted to me by Daniel Ellsberg, what jumped out at me were the secret memos from the National Security Council. Explaining the U.S. interest in Southeast Asia, they spoke bluntly of the country’s motives as a quest for “tin, rubber, oil.”

Neither the desertions of soldiers in the Mexican War, nor the draft riots of the Civil War, not the anti-imperialist groups at the turn of the century, nor the strong opposition to World War I — indeed no antiwar movement in the history of the nation reached the scale of the opposition to the war in Vietnam. At least part of that opposition rested on an understanding that more than Vietnam was at stake, that the brutal war in that tiny country was part of a grander imperial design.

Various interventions following the U.S. defeat in Vietnam seemed to reflect the desperate need of the still-reigning superpower — even after the fall of its powerful rival, the Soviet Union — to establish its dominance everywhere. Hence the invasion of Grenada in 1982, the bombing assault on Panama in 1989, the first Gulf war of 1991. Was George Bush Sr. heartsick over Saddam Hussein’s seizure of Kuwait, or was he using that event as an opportunity to move U.S. power firmly into the coveted oil region of the Middle East? Given the history of the United States, given its obsession with Middle Eastern oil dating from Franklin Roosevelt’s 1945 deal with King Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia, and the CIA’s overthrow of the democratic Mossadeq government in Iran in 1953, it is not hard to decide that question.

Justifying Empire

The ruthless attacks of September 11th (as the official 9/11 Commission acknowledged) derived from fierce hatred of U.S. expansion in the Middle East and elsewhere. Even before that event, the Defense Department acknowledged, according to Chalmers Johnson’s book The Sorrows of Empire, the existence of more than 700 American military bases outside of the United States.

Since that date, with the initiation of a “war on terrorism,” many more bases have been established or expanded: in Kyrgyzstan, Afghanistan, the desert of Qatar, the Gulf of Oman, the Horn of Africa, and wherever else a compliant nation could be bribed or coerced.

When I was bombing cities in Germany, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and France in the Second World War, the moral justification was so simple and clear as to be beyond discussion: We were saving the world from the evil of fascism. I was therefore startled to hear from a gunner on another crew — what we had in common was that we both read books — that he considered this “an imperialist war.” Both sides, he said, were motivated by ambitions of control and conquest. We argued without resolving the issue. Ironically, tragically, not long after our discussion, this fellow was shot down and killed on a mission.

In wars, there is always a difference between the motives of the soldiers and the motives of the political leaders who send them into battle. My motive, like that of so many, was innocent of imperial ambition. It was to help defeat fascism and create a more decent world, free of aggression, militarism, and racism.

The motive of the U.S. establishment, understood by the aerial gunner I knew, was of a different nature. It was described early in 1941 by Henry Luce, multi-millionaire owner of Time, Life, and Fortune magazines, as the coming of “The American Century.” The time had arrived, he said, for the United States “to exert upon the world the full impact of our influence, for such purposes as we see fit, and by such means as we see fit.”

We can hardly ask for a more candid, blunter declaration of imperial design. It has been echoed in recent years by the intellectual handmaidens of the Bush administration, but with assurances that the motive of this “influence” is benign, that the “purposes” — whether in Luce’s formulation or more recent ones — are noble, that this is an “imperialism lite.” As George Bush said in his second inaugural address: “Spreading liberty around the world is the calling of our time.” The New York Times called that speech “striking for its idealism.”

The American Empire has always been a bipartisan project — Democrats and Republicans have taken turns extending it, extolling it, justifying it. President Woodrow Wilson told graduates of the Naval Academy in 1914 (the year he bombarded Mexico) that the U.S. used “her navy and her army… as the instruments of civilization, not as the instruments of aggression.” And Bill Clinton, in 1992, told West Point graduates: “The values you learned here will be able to spread throughout the country and throughout the world.”

For the people of the United States, and indeed for people all over the world, those claims sooner or later are revealed to be false. The rhetoric, often persuasive on first hearing, soon becomes overwhelmed by horrors that can no longer be concealed: the bloody corpses of Iraq, the torn limbs of American GIs, the millions of families driven from their homes — in the Middle East and in the Mississippi Delta.

Have not the justifications for empire, embedded in our culture, assaulting our good sense — that war is necessary for security, that expansion is fundamental to civilization — begun to lose their hold on our minds? Have we reached a point in history where we are ready to embrace a new way of living in the world, expanding not our military power, but our humanity?
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank FCBarca for this useful post:
  #149  
Old 16.08.2021, 16:38
TonyClifton's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Hopefully soon to be Aargau
Posts: 2,109
Groaned at 946 Times in 528 Posts
Thanked 5,052 Times in 2,244 Posts
TonyClifton has a reputation beyond reputeTonyClifton has a reputation beyond reputeTonyClifton has a reputation beyond reputeTonyClifton has a reputation beyond reputeTonyClifton has a reputation beyond reputeTonyClifton has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
This is the key point here. China flexing her muscles, the Taliban were in China not long ago. Surely a pipeline across the country to connect the Gulf with China can't be far off. I would be nervous if I lived in Taiwan right now.

The West meanwhile is at war with itself. Divided, indebted, self-obsessed and weak. The Roman Empire ended in rather a similar way.
Well that didn't take long

Quote:
From what happened in Afghanistan, those in Taiwan should perceive that once a war breaks out in the Straits, the island’s defense will collapse in hours and US military won’t come to help. As a result, the DPP will quickly surrender.


https://twitter.com/globaltimesnews/...67130467119104
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank TonyClifton for this useful post:
  #150  
Old 16.08.2021, 16:42
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 17,414
Groaned at 685 Times in 533 Posts
Thanked 26,558 Times in 10,707 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Here's the entire thing for the subsahara countries (p. 11 from this report), there's very little difference between the Christians and the Muslims:
Most European laws were originally based on Hebrew laws from the bible.

Some have been dropped now (the ones about sorcery and witchcraft, for example).
Reply With Quote
  #151  
Old 16.08.2021, 17:06
parnell's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Geroldswil
Posts: 642
Groaned at 219 Times in 140 Posts
Thanked 2,165 Times in 1,024 Posts
parnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Sorry, it came from another pewforum survey, with the same graphic as the one you posted and at a quick glance, it looks like the same report so let's agree, if your source is okay for your slant on things then the same source must be okay for mine.
What slant of mine? I posted a Pew survey which returned 99% of Muslims in Afghanistan respondents in favour of Sharia law. You invented a caveat saying that all poll respondents were those "who believe sharia law comes from God himself." without a shred of evidence to support that.
Reply With Quote
  #152  
Old 16.08.2021, 17:08
parnell's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Geroldswil
Posts: 642
Groaned at 219 Times in 140 Posts
Thanked 2,165 Times in 1,024 Posts
parnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Here's the entire thing for the subsahara countries (p. 11 from this report), there's very little difference between the Christians and the Muslims:

I'm not in favour of importing fundamentalists of any strain but thanks for providing supporting evidence to suggest this is a terrible idea.
Reply With Quote
  #153  
Old 16.08.2021, 17:28
marton's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kt. Zürich
Posts: 12,003
Groaned at 630 Times in 534 Posts
Thanked 22,404 Times in 11,758 Posts
marton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
What slant of mine? I posted a Pew survey which returned 99% of Muslims in Afghanistan respondents in favour of Sharia law. You invented a caveat saying that all poll respondents were those "who believe sharia law comes from God himself." without a shred of evidence to support that.
Islam is a relatively young religion, needs time to mature.

The last UK person to be sentenced to death for blasphemy against the Christian religion was in Scotland around 400 years ago.
Reply With Quote
  #154  
Old 16.08.2021, 18:09
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,998
Groaned at 79 Times in 58 Posts
Thanked 4,307 Times in 2,309 Posts
rainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

I guess, most of these people just want stability.

In theory, Islam would provide that.

In practice, its (fundamentalist) proponents use it as a tool to push their (bellicose) agenda.

Just as their counter-parts in the US, they have no job in a peaceful world....
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank rainer_d for this useful post:
  #155  
Old 16.08.2021, 18:29
schoggiweggli's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: BaselStadt
Posts: 342
Groaned at 27 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 665 Times in 243 Posts
schoggiweggli has a reputation beyond reputeschoggiweggli has a reputation beyond reputeschoggiweggli has a reputation beyond reputeschoggiweggli has a reputation beyond reputeschoggiweggli has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

It’s probably time to start the thoughts and prayers again.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank schoggiweggli for this useful post:
  #156  
Old 16.08.2021, 18:43
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 17,414
Groaned at 685 Times in 533 Posts
Thanked 26,558 Times in 10,707 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
What slant of mine? I posted a Pew survey which returned 99% of Muslims in Afghanistan respondents in favour of Sharia law. You invented a caveat saying that all poll respondents were those "who believe sharia law comes from God himself." without a shred of evidence to support that.
So what does "Sharia law" mean to you to write "yet dumbasses want to bring these people to Europe" in your earlier response?

Reply With Quote
  #157  
Old 16.08.2021, 18:46
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 17,414
Groaned at 685 Times in 533 Posts
Thanked 26,558 Times in 10,707 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Islam is a relatively young religion, needs time to mature.

The last UK person to be sentenced to death for blasphemy against the Christian religion was in Scotland around 400 years ago.
And the last witch to be executed in Europe (also from bible-based Christian laws) was a mere 239 years ago.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Tom1234 for this useful post:
  #158  
Old 16.08.2021, 18:47
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 17,414
Groaned at 685 Times in 533 Posts
Thanked 26,558 Times in 10,707 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Islam is a relatively young religion, needs time to mature.

The last UK person to be sentenced to death for blasphemy against the Christian religion was in Scotland around 400 years ago.
And the last witch to be executed in Europe (also from bible-based Christian laws) was a mere 239 years ago.

To put that in some kind of context - this was only 100 years before the motorcar.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Tom1234 for this useful post:
  #159  
Old 16.08.2021, 19:11
parnell's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Geroldswil
Posts: 642
Groaned at 219 Times in 140 Posts
Thanked 2,165 Times in 1,024 Posts
parnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond reputeparnell has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
So what does "Sharia law" mean to you to write "yet dumbasses want to bring these people to Europe" in your earlier response?
Allow me to illustrate


Now while I'm absolutely in favour of your ability to go there I do not wish for that culture to come here - even moreso than it already has...

Quote:
Austrian authorities have arrested three Afghans as suspects in the rape and killing of a 13-year-old girl, a crime that has prompted strong condemnation and tough talk from the country’s leader on crimes committed by migrants.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank parnell for this useful post:
This user groans at parnell for this post:
  #160  
Old 16.08.2021, 19:28
olygirl's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: d' Innerschwiiz
Posts: 7,779
Groaned at 418 Times in 282 Posts
Thanked 18,329 Times in 5,676 Posts
olygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Afghanistan: misplaced trust in USA evident?

Quote:
View Post
Allow me to illustrate


Now while I'm absolutely in favour of your ability to go there I do not wish for that culture to come here - even moreso than it already has...
You’re stereotyping and branding a whole race simply because of a few bad apples. That’s racism, Parnell.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank olygirl for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Family Reunion for Non-EU (from Afghanistan) Fariha Permits/visas/government 19 14.03.2018 04:08
Misplaced my licence, can I drive there to get it ? RuJoMa Daily life 49 17.12.2014 18:29
misplaced contract lemet Housing in general 0 09.01.2014 00:08
What are we achieving in Afghanistan? Sbrinz International affairs/politics 57 24.09.2012 00:13
Armchair Volunteering - Afghanistan sojoh International affairs/politics 0 09.03.2009 11:18


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 00:21.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0