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  #41  
Old 29.06.2011, 14:40
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Hi Joyce. Please take a look at the following Swiss Govt site:
http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/en/home/...ontentPar_0004

Some excerpts of interest to you:
I assume you're over 22 years of age, and the Swissness of your parents/grandparents is in question. Are you 32 or younger?

Swiss Citizenship by Simplified Naturalization

3. A foreign child who could not become a Swiss citizen because a parent lost Swiss citizenship before the child’s birth (e.g., by a release from Swiss citizenship) can obtain simplified naturalization if he or she has close ties to Switzerland.
5. If the child is older than age 22, he or she can be naturalized only by the regular procedure, even if he or she has close ties to Switzerland.

Reinstatement of Swiss Citizenship
A foreign-born child who holds another citizenship in addition to Swiss citizenship loses Swiss citizenship if he or she was not registered with a domestic Swiss authority or a Swiss authority abroad (e.g., a Swiss representation or a Swiss civil registry) by age 22 at the latest.
If the child is older than age 22, he or she can file an application for reinstatement of citizenship within a period of ten years. If he or she has close ties to Switzerland, the application can be filed also after the deadline has expired.


Conclusion
Assuming your great grandfather was Swiss, did he register your grandparents as Swiss in the US?
Did they register your parents?
Have you contacted the Consulate?
Ask the Texaner. He received Swiss Citizenship at over 30 because
of these rules. I believe his son did as well.
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  #42  
Old 29.06.2011, 15:26
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Sure. A Swiss-born couple of Swiss citizens producing offspring in Switzerland = new Swiss citizen.

Having a distant relative who was Swiss -- not so much.
Correct. But if OP's great-grandfather is Swiss, then doesn't that imply that the grandfather should've gotten Swiss citizenship as well (from his fater) which then means OP's father should've also getten Swiss citizenship, which then means that OP could get Swiss citizenship through her father?! no?
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  #43  
Old 29.06.2011, 15:47
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Correct. But if OP's great-grandfather is Swiss, then doesn't that imply that the grandfather should've gotten Swiss citizenship as well (from his fater) which then means OP's father should've also getten Swiss citizenship, which then means that OP could get Swiss citizenship through her father?! no?
No. Because they didn't, she can't.

Simples.
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  #44  
Old 29.06.2011, 16:07
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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unfortunately, it is. The only exception to self-registration at 18, is if you were previously registered at birth.

After that, as far as the system is concerned, you're just another non-EU applicant.

Edit: I just re-read this and it may be unclear. in order to obtain a Swiss passport while being born in another country, at least one of your parents must also hold a Swiss passport.
Sigh...well that last (edited) bit doesn't make me feel as bad lol. Thank you again for all this new (to me) and good information! (even if it's not good for me lol)

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Hi Joyce. Please take a look at the following Swiss Govt site:
http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/en/home/...ontentPar_0004

Some excerpts of interest to you:
I assume you're over 22 years of age, and the Swissness of your parents/grandparents is in question. Are you 32 or younger?

Swiss Citizenship by Simplified Naturalization

3. A foreign child who could not become a Swiss citizen because a parent lost Swiss citizenship before the child’s birth (e.g., by a release from Swiss citizenship) can obtain simplified naturalization if he or she has close ties to Switzerland.
5. If the child is older than age 22, he or she can be naturalized only by the regular procedure, even if he or she has close ties to Switzerland.

Reinstatement of Swiss Citizenship
A foreign-born child who holds another citizenship in addition to Swiss citizenship loses Swiss citizenship if he or she was not registered with a domestic Swiss authority or a Swiss authority abroad (e.g., a Swiss representation or a Swiss civil registry) by age 22 at the latest.
If the child is older than age 22, he or she can file an application for reinstatement of citizenship within a period of ten years. If he or she has close ties to Switzerland, the application can be filed also after the deadline has expired.


Conclusion
Assuming your great grandfather was Swiss, did he register your grandparents as Swiss in the US?
Did they register your parents?
Have you contacted the Consulate?
I'm pretty sure my grandfather was not passed down citizenship from his father, though I am waiting to hear back on that. Either way, my grandfather did not pass it down to my father.

I have not contacted the Consulate yet. I will be doing that soon though.

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Ask the Texaner. He received Swiss Citizenship at over 30 because
of these rules. I believe his son did as well.
Really? I am assuming his parents had citizenship though? Can we get him in here?? lol

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Correct. But if OP's great-grandfather is Swiss, then doesn't that imply that the grandfather should've gotten Swiss citizenship as well (from his fater) which then means OP's father should've also getten Swiss citizenship, which then means that OP could get Swiss citizenship through her father?! no?
That's how I read it lol. Oh well. That's too bad...I'm sure that either my great-grandfather didn't know, or didn't think we would ever want to move back to Switzerland from America. What a shame!
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  #45  
Old 29.06.2011, 17:18
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Reinstatement of Swiss Citizenship
A foreign-born child who holds another citizenship in addition to Swiss citizenship loses Swiss citizenship if he or she was not registered with a domestic Swiss authority or a Swiss authority abroad (e.g., a Swiss representation or a Swiss civil registry) by age 22 at the latest.
If the child is older than age 22, he or she can file an application for reinstatement of citizenship within a period of ten years. If he or she has close ties to Switzerland, the application can be filed also after the deadline has expired.


Conclusion
Assuming your great grandfather was Swiss, did he register your grandparents as Swiss in the US?
Did they register your parents?
Have you contacted the Consulate?
How it this applicable? She’s over 22, and the 10 year clause is irrelevant because she never had a passport.
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  #46  
Old 29.06.2011, 23:47
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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magyir

Reinstatement of Swiss Citizenship
A foreign-born child who holds another citizenship in addition to Swiss citizenship loses Swiss citizenship if he or she was not registered with a domestic Swiss authority or a Swiss authority abroad (e.g., a Swiss representation or a Swiss civil registry) by age 22 at the latest.
If the child is older than age 22, he or she can file an application for reinstatement of citizenship within a period of ten years. If he or she has close ties to Switzerland, the application can be filed also after the deadline has expired.

So how is this relevant? Try the following scenario, and remember I'm only asking to provide the OP with a few lines of enquiry once she contacts the consulate. In addition the OP has stated she has ties to CH in BE and ZH, and her Dad has done research incl. in D.C.

Putting this all together:
Assuming Grandad was born outside CH, did he acquire at birth another citizenship? If so he lost his CH citizenship unless a registration took place. I already asked this.
If by some stroke of luck for the OP, this happened OR the CH-citizenship could be interpreted as "not lost" then the door is open for Dad and OP.

Alternatively if by some chance the grandfather didn't have another citizenship at birth, he is Swiss from great-Grandad. This means the father (still alive I assume) can apply, and also the OP based on the Swiss ties.

So the questions I would ask the OP are as follows:

1. Was Grandpa born outside CH? (assuming Great-Grandad and Mom were married).
2. If so did Grandpa get another citizenship at birth for him to lose his CH-citizenship at birth (pending timely CH-registration)? Or did he in fact start life as "Swiss by default"?
3. Do we know if by some stroke of luck he was CH-registered? (thereby preserving CH-citizenship for Dad).
4. If so is Dad planning to register based on his genealogy research thereby potentially opening the door to OP (if Dad qualifies, OP might also).

Certainly a line of enquiry worth making, especially as Dad has already started getting records together....
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  #47  
Old 30.06.2011, 00:29
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

I have a friend from Venezuela that is in the exact situation you are in. He finally got his Swiss citizenship.
His father got it first then he was next in line.
I believe that the easiest route would be for your father to get the Swiss citizenship via the facilitated route assuming he speaks one of the national languages and can demonstrate some ties to Switzerland. Then you could be next in line.
Your closest consulate or the embassy can help you.
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  #48  
Old 30.06.2011, 01:14
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Ask the Texaner. He received Swiss Citizenship at over 30 because
of these rules. I believe his son did as well.
Really? I am assuming his parents had citizenship though? Can we get him in here?? lol
My case went very similarly to that documented in Gonzus' thread (in fact it's included, towards the end). My Swiss grandfather moved to the US as a young man. His daughter (my mom) married a US citizen before she was 21, thereby "losing" her Swiss citizenship. Only recently were Swiss laws changed permitting her -- or her children (that's me!) -- to apply (and PAY) for "facilitated naturalization." And yes, my minor son was given citizenship automatically with mine (the others will have to apply on their own, if they want it). The details of the process are laid out by several people in that thread. I hope that's at least somewhat helpful.
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  #49  
Old 30.06.2011, 01:20
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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magyir

Reinstatement of Swiss Citizenship
A foreign-born child who holds another citizenship in addition to Swiss citizenship loses Swiss citizenship if he or she was not registered with a domestic Swiss authority or a Swiss authority abroad (e.g., a Swiss representation or a Swiss civil registry) by age 22 at the latest.
If the child is older than age 22, he or she can file an application for reinstatement of citizenship within a period of ten years. If he or she has close ties to Switzerland, the application can be filed also after the deadline has expired.

So how is this relevant? Try the following scenario, and remember I'm only asking to provide the OP with a few lines of enquiry once she contacts the consulate. In addition the OP has stated she has ties to CH in BE and ZH, and her Dad has done research incl. in D.C.

Putting this all together:
Assuming Grandad was born outside CH, did he acquire at birth another citizenship? If so he lost his CH citizenship unless a registration took place. I already asked this.
If by some stroke of luck for the OP, this happened OR the CH-citizenship could be interpreted as "not lost" then the door is open for Dad and OP.

Alternatively if by some chance the grandfather didn't have another citizenship at birth, he is Swiss from great-Grandad. This means the father (still alive I assume) can apply, and also the OP based on the Swiss ties.

So the questions I would ask the OP are as follows:

1. Was Grandpa born outside CH? (assuming Great-Grandad and Mom were married).
2. If so did Grandpa get another citizenship at birth for him to lose his CH-citizenship at birth (pending timely CH-registration)? Or did he in fact start life as "Swiss by default"?
3. Do we know if by some stroke of luck he was CH-registered? (thereby preserving CH-citizenship for Dad).
4. If so is Dad planning to register based on his genealogy research thereby potentially opening the door to OP (if Dad qualifies, OP might also).

Certainly a line of enquiry worth making, especially as Dad has already started getting records together....
1. My grandpa was born in Wisconsin, USA. Great Grandpa and Grandma were married.
2. I am assuming he obtained a US citizenship when he was born in Wisconsin and "lost" his CH-citizenship.
3. I have not gotten an answer yet as to whether he CH-registered...so that answer is to come.
4. If it would help me get a citizenship for me, I'm sure my father (yes, still alive) would be more than happy to gain CH-citizenship to pass down to me. Also, I forgot to mention earlier, I'm 29.

BTW, thank you for all the information you provided...whether I am able to gain citizenship this way or not. It's very good information nonetheless, and I appreciate it!

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I have a friend from Venezuela that is in the exact situation you are in. He finally got his Swiss citizenship.
His father got it first then he was next in line.
I believe that the easiest route would be for your father to get the Swiss citizenship via the facilitated route assuming he speaks one of the national languages and can demonstrate some ties to Switzerland. Then you could be next in line.
Your closest consulate or the embassy can help you.
Problem...neither my father nor I speak any of the national languages fluently...currently. (I will be starting German lessons soon) Also, what exactly does "close ties to Switzerland" mean? I saw this in the link too...does that mean that we simply have contact with our family there? Or does it need to be more than that?
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Old 30.06.2011, 01:22
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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My case went very similarly to that documented in Gonzus' thread (in fact it's included, towards the end). My Swiss grandfather moved to the US as a young man. His daughter (my mom) married a US citizen before she was 21, thereby "losing" her Swiss citizenship. Only recently were Swiss laws changed permitting her -- or her children (that's me!) -- to apply (and PAY) for "facilitated naturalization." And yes, my minor son was given citizenship automatically with mine (the others will have to apply on their own, if they want it). The details of the process are laid out by several people in that thread. I hope that's at least somewhat helpful.
Yes, very helpful!! I will check that thread out. Thanks, Texaner!
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  #51  
Old 30.06.2011, 01:30
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Problem...neither my father nor I speak any of the national languages fluently...currently. (I will be starting German lessons soon) Also, what exactly does "close ties to Switzerland" mean? I saw this in the link too...does that mean that we simply have contact with our family there? Or does it need to be more than that?
It implies a certain number of trips to Switzerland (3 I believe) and anything that shows a connection to the culture (being a member of a local Swiss club etc...).
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Old 30.06.2011, 01:34
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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It implies a certain number of trips to Switzerland (3 I believe) and anything that shows a connection to the culture (being a member of a local Swiss club etc...).
Well, I've got 2 trips down...but no stamps in my passports for them. Both times I visited Switzerland I entered Europe through a different country. Not sure how I'd prove them besides pictures and video taken there or souvenirs and receipts? Not sure if that would count or not.
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  #53  
Old 30.06.2011, 06:13
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

There is no specific number of trips you need to take to have "close ties". In fact it's rather subjective. The more ties you can document the better.

Membership to Swiss clubs, family, trips, friends, language, do you do any Swiss traditional things (can you yodel. ), etc. They will call your friends & family to verify you have ties to them and that you are an upstanding citizen. So don't write down people you don't know well.
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Old 30.06.2011, 07:31
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

I thought that they were pretty rigid on the three trips to Switzerland. It is seen by many as an unfair way to "weed" people from the poorer countries that cannot afford trips to Switzerland. The rule was set when Blocher was at the head of the department. They'd rather give the Swiss citizenship to rich people from developed countries than Swiss descendants from let's say Paraguay.
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Old 30.06.2011, 15:04
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Reinstatement of Swiss Citizenship
A foreign-born child who holds another citizenship in addition to Swiss citizenship loses Swiss citizenship if he or she was not registered with a domestic Swiss authority or a Swiss authority abroad (e.g., a Swiss representation or a Swiss civil registry) by age 22 at the latest.
If the child is older than age 22, he or she can file an application for reinstatement of citizenship within a period of ten years. If he or she has close ties to Switzerland, the application can be filed also after the deadline has expired.
Not 100% sure naturally, but I would assume that her great-grandfather would have moved over 10 years ago...

I'm sorry, this won't work. You need to have an "ancestor" that is able to pull this, for which a great-grandparent is just too far.
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Old 30.06.2011, 15:50
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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There is no specific number of trips you need to take to have "close ties". In fact it's rather subjective. The more ties you can document the better.

Membership to Swiss clubs, family, trips, friends, language, do you do any Swiss traditional things (can you yodel. ), etc. They will call your friends & family to verify you have ties to them and that you are an upstanding citizen. So don't write down people you don't know well.
LOL I sure could learn to yodel! j/k

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Not 100% sure naturally, but I would assume that her great-grandfather would have moved over 10 years ago...

I'm sorry, this won't work. You need to have an "ancestor" that is able to pull this, for which a great-grandparent is just too far.
Yeah, I understand. Kind of a bummer to find out I could have had a Swiss citizenship already.

My grandfather got back to me and he does not have a Swiss citizenship nor was he CH-registered.

My dad sent me my great-grandfather's ship record info from when he arrived in 1920. Interesting enough, he didn't plan on living in the US for more than 8 years and planned on returning to Switzerland. I'm assuming he decided to stay because he met my great-grandmother here. I'm guessing he didn't know he could pass down citizenship to his children.
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Old 30.06.2011, 17:03
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

OK so your Grandfather is still alive? Then technically he can apply/register on foot of his Dad, your great-Grandad.
Can he demonstrate close ties to CH?
The goal then would be that if he can, you and your Dad qualify, especially as you haven't reached 32 yet. So if before you're 32 your Dad can be Swiss, you would be too!

Follow?

When are you calling the Consulate for advice?
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Old 30.06.2011, 17:15
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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OK so your Grandfather is still alive? Then technically he can apply/register on foot of his Dad, your great-Grandad.
Can he demonstrate close ties to CH?
The goal then would be that if he can, you and your Dad qualify, especially as you haven't reached 32 yet. So if before you're 32 your Dad can be Swiss, you would be too!

Follow?

When are you calling the Consulate for advice?
Yes, I follow. I just thought from what I read that it is too late for my grandfather to apply/register since he is older than 32?

The closest 'Consulate' to me is the actual US Embassy in DC, and I am going up there in 2 weeks so I was going to see if I could get an appointment with them when I go up there. I was waiting to get more info from my grandfather and father before I talk to them, which I got today, so I will be calling today on my lunch break to see if I can get an appointment, if they cannot answer my questions by phone that is.
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Old 01.07.2011, 01:15
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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Yeah, I understand. Kind of a bummer to find out I could have had a Swiss citizenship already.
you see, my suggestion was indeed serious
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Old 01.07.2011, 01:33
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Re: Intro - US Citizen Wanting to Move to Switzerland

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you see, my suggestion was indeed serious
Yes you were, and I thank you for that! Again, sorry for doubting you, I just couldn't tell and some of the people on this forum can be a bit snarky. Lol
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