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  #21  
Old 05.12.2013, 00:37
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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And in Trieste was Slovene (80+%)!

So your point is?

Tom
the point is that historic links can be useful in modern times. Practical example : we last spring had an assembly of our co-operative in a restaurant. The excellent waiter spoke an excellent German and when I asked him from what corner of Germany he was from he laughingly replied " from Slovakia". It became clear that in the 1960ies, 70ies, 80ies, 90ies, people in Czechia, Slovakia, Hungary, fully aware of the old links to WIEN, had carefully learnt German, usually ALONGSIDE English ---- why not in Slovenia ? if you compare the post 1918 history of Czechia, Slovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Slovenioa you know why ! The OP is among those who now suffer
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  #22  
Old 05.12.2013, 00:53
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

Well, in Trieste, despite being one of the four major cities (and only sea port) of the A-H empire, German was NEVER the language!

You can still get along with Slovene there, though, but forget German!

Tom
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  #23  
Old 05.12.2013, 02:00
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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the point is that historic links can be useful in modern times. Practical example : we last spring had an assembly of our co-operative in a restaurant. The excellent waiter spoke an excellent German and when I asked him from what corner of Germany he was from he laughingly replied " from Slovakia". It became clear that in the 1960ies, 70ies, 80ies, 90ies, people in Czechia, Slovakia, Hungary, fully aware of the old links to WIEN, had carefully learnt German, usually ALONGSIDE English ---- why not in Slovenia ? if you compare the post 1918 history of Czechia, Slovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Slovenioa you know why ! The OP is among those who now suffer
This is quite a controversial summary, based on the testimony of a single waiter?!?
Unfortunately, in all of the above mentioned countries, the main foreign language during the communism was...Russian! The main Western language was usually French, English became popular only in the late eighties.
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  #24  
Old 05.12.2013, 08:19
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

From my experience:

As Adrian said, for a job with high qualifications, you don't need much German (here in the German-speaking part). Do you know any German? Starting to study it might be a good idea, so that you know at least some (A1-A2 level). For jobs with few qualifications, if you have a bit of German, it will help you.

Yes, it's true that German and Italian were spoken in Slovenia, and still are spoken in some parts of the country. So was Serbian/Croatian. German used to be the foreign language of educated people in that part of the world, before. Now it is English, which you speak.

I do feel it's unfair that you, from Slovenia, are berated for not speaking more than two languages (your native Slovene and English), while many English-native people expect to get a job in English here and nobody bats an eyelash. I think that you'll be fine if you start learning one of the other languages - with your EU-permit - and no perfection expected.
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Old 05.12.2013, 09:31
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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A) many on here got their job AT HOME and not here
B) primary language to get any job in the Canton of Zürich is German
C) as soon as any Slovene company has outlets overhere, the place to apply to a job, and in Slovene language, is in Ljubljana
I wish I had a clue of what you are going on about here...
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  #26  
Old 05.12.2013, 13:22
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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No Sir, this is rubbish. The USA in those territories was the first modern country in evidence. To deny modern history is rubbish. In case of most of German speaking Switzerland people realize very well that the territories in questions were part of the Roman Empire of German Nation. People in Zürich and Bern KNOW that the two cities were Free Imperial Cities of the German Empire

Back to the USA, YES, French was spoken in La Louisiane and in many ways still IS spoken in the Southern part of Louisiana. Russian was in use in what is now Northern California and Oregon and Washington State. Spanish was the language in Southern California, New Mexico, Arizona, much of Tejas/Texas, and areas of Florida. While people in southern Lousiana in upper deducation DO learn French, people in Southern parts of Texas and in Florida etc DO learn Spanish, and of course are very well aware of the past.

Alright, I can well understand your problem with English<>German. I had the same problem in Secondary School. You had to decide between Italian and English. My preference would have been Italian, but Mum, insisting that most of our family were English speaking Texans pressed ahead with English and as I was "behind" anyway, finally repeated the 2nd Secondary Class, so that everything tuned in. No no no it was NOT a "lost" year, but a year WON

I much later on started to learn (or re-learn) Arabic, the language of my ancestors on the real father side. Yes, my accent of course was top-notch right from the start, but my real command was as miserable as the one of all the others
Wow, you went ballistic on the rubbish theory. My point is that if something was spoken long before you were born, it is equal as me saying to somebody in the western parts, you should understand the Indians because maybe some of your great great great parents did..

If its 100 or 300 years, it does not matter! What matters is what languages are being currently practised! Our general mood after the 2 WW was that we look the other way, so my grandfather who had a German surname had to abandon the W and replace it with V.

You were not living here, so you don't know what the mentality was!
We were the winning side and only today Slovenians are in full swing towards the Northern states, only after the collapse of Yugoslavia did the mood gradually change.



Instead of helping you are quite a gun slinger, bringing nothing but hard topics of no impact and just cause to the theme.

I get it, you live in heaven there, don't get these Balkan brutes to come, they might ruin it for the rest of you...
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Old 05.12.2013, 13:40
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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From my experience:

As Adrian said, for a job with high qualifications, you don't need much German (here in the German-speaking part). Do you know any German? Starting to study it might be a good idea, so that you know at least some (A1-A2 level). For jobs with few qualifications, if you have a bit of German, it will help you.

Yes, it's true that German and Italian were spoken in Slovenia, and still are spoken in some parts of the country. So was Serbian/Croatian. German used to be the foreign language of educated people in that part of the world, before. Now it is English, which you speak.

I do feel it's unfair that you, from Slovenia, are berated for not speaking more than two languages (your native Slovene and English), while many English-native people expect to get a job in English here and nobody bats an eyelash. I think that you'll be fine if you start learning one of the other languages - with your EU-permit - and no perfection expected.

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From my experience:

As Adrian said, for a job with high qualifications, you don't need much German (here in the German-speaking part). Do you know any German? Starting to study it might be a good idea, so that you know at least some (A1-A2 level). For jobs with few qualifications, if you have a bit of German, it will help you.

Yes, it's true that German and Italian were spoken in Slovenia, and still are spoken in some parts of the country. So was Serbian/Croatian. German used to be the foreign language of educated people in that part of the world, before. Now it is English, which you speak.

I do feel it's unfair that you, from Slovenia, are berated for not speaking more than two languages (your native Slovene and English), while many English-native people expect to get a job in English here and nobody bats an eyelash. I think that you'll be fine if you start learning one of the other languages - with your EU-permit - and no perfection expected.
well I can somewhat understand German and i did yome basic course but to speak it, yes its a process!

Berated?
Actually the majority understand Serbo-Croat. I speak it fluently.

I really do not get your post, as if the French, Brits or the Yenks are so well spoken in other languages.

Currently 3 is the minimum, but others who are on the outskirts of the capital speak even more.

The thing is you cannot know where you will reside, what if you get the job in the part of the French? You are a rare country with such a predominant 3 languages.
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  #28  
Old 05.12.2013, 13:46
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

You've had help/advice so don't complain if you don't like it.

As an EU-8 national you're allowed to come here and search for work for an initial 3 months. You'll register with the commune/gemeinde you decide to live in as a job seeker and this allows you to live in Switzerland. If/when you find a job, provided the Swiss authorities approve your new employer's application, you will get a permit which also allows you to work.

However, there are plenty of people already here who have said permit AND speak the language/s so it won't be easy.

Should you not find work in the first 3 months you can ask for an L permit which will allow you to search for another 3 months, providing you have the funds to support yourself while doing so.

Have a read here:

https://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/bfm...-efta/faq.html

of how the Swiss system works. Be aware that there are quota limits for EU-8 nationals to work here.
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Old 05.12.2013, 13:48
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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This is quite a controversial summary, based on the testimony of a single waiter?!?
Unfortunately, in all of the above mentioned countries, the main foreign language during the communism was...Russian! The main Western language was usually French, English became popular only in the late eighties.
Nothing is based on a single waiter, but on many people over many years, between the 1980ies and now. On visits to Budapest I spoke German with people in downtown and English at the airport. Most in pre 1990 of course would have spoken Russian first of all.

I in case of contacts with people in/from the former Comecon states always have in mind that the changes were swift and for people rather unpractical. While we overhere were in the armchair position people overthere had to eat the whole sh.....

We over many years (1990 to 2003) had many visits of a Slovak airliner-pilot who of course spoke both English and German fluently, but such an experience does not allow conclusions
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Old 05.12.2013, 13:50
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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Well, in Trieste, despite being one of the four major cities (and only sea port) of the A-H empire, German was NEVER the language!

You can still get along with Slovene there, though, but forget German!

Tom
You cannot compare Italian which for centuries was a well established "culture language" in Europe with Slovenian which did not have the same position. People from north-of-the-Alps Europe learnt Italian ages before the Risorgimento

AND just as German speaking Swiss have no alternative to learning BOTH English and French and a bit of Italian, Slovenians should learn English and a bit of German and/or Italian, for their very own comfort
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Old 05.12.2013, 13:58
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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well I can somewhat understand German and i did yome basic course but to speak it, yes its a process!

Berated?
Actually the majority understand Serbo-Croat. I speak it fluently.

I really do not get your post, as if the French, Brits or the Yenks are so well spoken in other languages.

Currently 3 is the minimum, but others who are on the outskirts of the capital speak even more.
My point was that people here are telling you you should know more languages, while they don't say the same to the native English speakers (many of whom speak only English).
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Old 07.12.2013, 08:33
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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My point was that people here are telling you you should know more languages, while they don't say the same to the native English speakers (many of whom speak only English).
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  #33  
Old 06.01.2015, 07:29
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Re: Newbie here, Slovenian looking for some help

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You cannot compare Italian which for centuries was a well established "culture language" in Europe with Slovenian which did not have the same position. People from north-of-the-Alps Europe learnt Italian ages before the Risorgimento

AND just as German speaking Swiss have no alternative to learning BOTH English and French and a bit of Italian, Slovenians should learn English and a bit of German and/or Italian, for their very own comfort
Wollishofener,

perhaps you didn't know that the first known records of the Slovenian language are older than a millennium.

For the second part, I guess it is so.

Regards.
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