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  #61  
Old 28.04.2017, 15:38
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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To answer BokerTov, I think 3Wishes* missed an important "access": Access to Europe. For me one of the beauties of living in Geneva is that the airport is nextdoor and you can fly to pretty much anywhere in Europe in an hour or so. In that time, where can you get to from Vail, CO? Retirement isn't all about sitting in a bathchair swaddled in a blanket looking at the view with a whiff of urine in the air - or I bloody hope it isn't.

*I realize 3W wasn't directly answering BT, but when I saw the list of accesses I couldn't help quoting them.
No offense taken. When I talk about access to activities, that can include possibilities in neighboring countries too. If we're honest, the U.S. is massive so it's hard to get anywhere truly "different" with just a 1-hour flight from your starting point.

However, OP may prefer a locale that's not near a major Swiss airport. I keep hearing how amazing Glarus is, for example.
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Old 28.04.2017, 16:04
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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However, OP may prefer a locale that's not near a major Swiss airport. I keep hearing how amazing Glarus is, for example.
Ziegelbrücke - Zürich Flughafen 1 hour 5 minutes.
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Old 28.04.2017, 17:24
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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To answer BokerTov, I think 3Wishes* missed an important "access": Access to Europe. For me one of the beauties of living in Geneva is that the airport is nextdoor and you can fly to pretty much anywhere in Europe in an hour or so. In that time, where can you get to from Vail, CO? Retirement isn't all about sitting in a bathchair swaddled in a blanket looking at the view with a whiff of urine in the air - or I bloody hope it isn't.
You make a great point, and, as I said in my initial post: "Maybe they see this as their "home base" to travel around Europe, but then again, why pick the most expensive country?"

Maybe they just like CH a lot, expensive or not. From the OP's follow up post, it looks like they are well prepared and have done/are doing their homework, so I wish them the best of luck!
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Old 28.04.2017, 22:49
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

Coming back to the age and health points.
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Health care is very good (with exceptions, always, depending on some individuals), as long as you have the insurance to cover what you need, or independent funds to buy in anything not covered.

Public transport, particularly in the cities, is excellent. This extends the mobility of the aged and frail, enabling them to go out even once they've had to give up their drivers' licences.
Basically this is all true and if one has the funds to cover all the extras all should go well.
However, health problems increase over the years.
Unless one's hearing loss is over 30%, one pays almost the whole price for hearing aids oneself. And I am talking Fr. 8,000. Varilux glasses with 'bad' astigmatism don't fit into the 'we have cheap glasses for you' spectrum either. Possibly in America the costs are very similar, but one hardly thinks about these things until one needs them.

For folk with medical problems, using public transport has become more possible but I wouldn't say easy. Many trains have 'level entrances' but not all. Trams and buses too. The seats intended for the use of folk with disabilities are often used by others. Of course one can ask people to move but with balance problems, a paralysed arm and a game leg plus speech difficulty after a stroke, a close friend of mine is very glad that she drives a car.

Another thing I would think about is that if you come to Switzerland to retire, presumably you 'plan' to die here. And what happens to the partner?

Probably this sounds very negative, but it is simply being realistic.
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  #65  
Old 28.04.2017, 23:33
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

I'd confirm the above.

Distance to family is also key. Our adult daughters, and our grandchildren, live in the UK- but we see each other often, here, there, or somewhere in between, or beyond (when we arrange holidays together). In an emergency, either of them could me here in hours- and if one of them calls us in an emergency- we can jump in the car and be at the airport and on our way in a couple of hours.

And we do have strong ties here, speak the language and know what's what and who's who. Not easy to start from scratch, without the language or any support- as you get older.
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Old 29.04.2017, 10:32
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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We're an active American couple from Vail, Colorado. We've been in Switzerland many times and love it. We speak "travel German" well enough to feel very comfortable as independent travelers. We have the resources to retire there comfortably. We'll be back in late May, and would love to visit with some English speakers who have done it.

Thanks
Hi Pete!
Vail is also nice! Why not retire there?
I myself cant say what it's like yet. But there are certain pluses here like an excellent public transport system to many remote destinations and decent medical facilities including home care: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spitex.
Other then that you may want to look here for more info: https://www.ch.ch/en/retirement-or-study-switzerland/
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Old 29.04.2017, 11:52
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

Sun is shining this morning, but another cloud on the horizon.

Spitex workers, Home Helps in general and staff in retirement homes and hospitals may well be German speaking, but may well not be Swiss or German. Two people conversing in a tongue foreign to both of them results in odd misunderstandings sometimes. To ask for a loaf of bread is not in the same league as trying to explain that you would absolutely love to be taken outside for a while and would appreciate it very much if the staff have time, but that you don't want to put anyone to any real inconvenience or make a nuisance of yourself. (with a possible black mark to your name). Ask MathNut!

I saw a TV Programme not so very long back about British subjects who had moved to Spain in their retirement and had a wonderful time while they were still 'young and fit'. Later in a retirement home things changed dramatically. With, 'non-English speaking and non English way-of-life knowing' staff, they were very lonely indeed. That Pension rulings had changed didn't help much.

Again, it certainly isn't all negative by any means, but I think your idea to meet up with others who have done the same thing as you are planning, is excellent. It's just that I don't personally know anyone who has.
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Old 29.04.2017, 11:58
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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Sun is shining this morning, but another cloud on the horizon.

Spitex workers, Home Helps in general and staff in retirement homes and hospitals may well be German speaking, but may well not be Swiss or German. Two people conversing in a tongue foreign to both of them results in odd misunderstandings sometimes. To ask for a loaf of bread is not in the same league as trying to explain that you would absolutely love to be taken outside for a while and would appreciate it very much if the staff have time, but that you don't want to put anyone to any real inconvenience or make a nuisance of yourself. (with a possible black mark to your name). Ask MathNut!

I saw a TV Programme not so very long back about British subjects who had moved to Spain in their retirement and had a wonderful time while they were still 'young and fit'. Later in a retirement home things changed dramatically. With, 'non-English speaking and non English way-of-life knowing' staff, they were very lonely indeed. That Pension rulings had changed didn't help much.

Again, it certainly isn't all negative by any means, but I think your idea to meet up with others who have done the same thing as you are planning, is excellent. It's just that I don't personally know anyone who has.
But English is the 2nd language of Switzerland. Everybody speaks it (unless your some Oberlander over 70)
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  #69  
Old 29.04.2017, 12:06
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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But English is the 2nd language of Switzerland. Everybody speaks it (unless your some Oberlander over 70)
In the German speaking part maybe but not around these parts.
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:12
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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But English is the 2nd language of Switzerland. Everybody speaks it (unless your some Oberlander over 70)
Most definitely not true in my neck of the woods.

Plenty of people don't speak English, many more won't.

Sure, you can get by shopping by smiling and pointing, or while following the Pilgerweg as a tourist. But good luck dealing with bureaucracy, finding a plumber or an electrician, dealing with the police after having been burgled, or accessing health care. The local doctor doesn't do consultations in English, nor do will you find many willing or able at the local hospital, especially among nursing staff, the folks most important to your recovery.

No, where I live German is a must. And the resisitance to speaking English is stronger among younger folks, the 30-somethings. It's a matter of national pride. German only.

Speaking standard German is fine, as long as you understand enough Dialekt so that the person you are speaking to does not have to switch.

YMMV - but it would not be in your best interest to assume you can live here without at least rudimentary local language skills.
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:19
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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Another thing I would think about is that if you comes to Switzerland to retire, presumably you 'plan' to die here. And what happens to the partner?
This is something to consider.

I heard a sad story at the Kaffeeklatsch yesterday, apparently a friend-of-a-friend-of-a-friend has been told she must leave.

The lady, non-EU and of retirement age, came here as a dependent of her EU husband. Husband died unexpectedly - which means her permit is no longer valid. She does not qualify to stay on her own.

As above, this is a friend-of-a-friend-of-a-friend story, so grain of salt and all that. But it does make one stop and think.
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:34
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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No, where I live German is a must. And the resisitance to speaking English is stronger among younger folks, the 30-somethings. It's a matter of national pride. German only.
Totally agree with that. Even in Zurich city not only in some remote village.

I can't believe people think it's different...
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:35
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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But English is the 2nd language of Switzerland. Everybody speaks it (unless your some Oberlander over 70)
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In the German speaking part maybe but not around these parts.
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Most definitely not true in my neck of the woods.
Plenty of people don't speak English, many more won't.
I rather thought that robBob was joking. Whether he was or not, the fact is that even if 'the Swiss' do speak English, many of the foreigners who work here in social surroundings certainly do not.
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:37
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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But English is the 2nd language of Switzerland. Everybody speaks it (unless your some Oberlander over 70)
Everybody speaks English. Whether they feel like ditching their local tongue for a newcomer is another question. The fact that my people have instisted on local language instead of practicing their English have helped immensely. But not everybody is in the same position/immediate need to actually appreciate this. Some newcomers obviously don't want this or it is hard for them to iearn. Just because local folks speak English will not mean they will be thrilled about using it with yank retirees.
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:41
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

Who is 'everybody'? Maybe if you work in a grammar school sort of environment, the folk you have daily contact with do. But in my lowly area of contacts, buddy, they sure don't.
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:52
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

Indeed- in my village I know only 4 people who speak some English, badly- and 1 who is fluent... because she is British (lived here 40+ years).

Even in the larger villages in the Valley, those who speak English are friends who have lived and worked abroad most of their life, and like us, decided to return here in retirement but still travel a lot. I know all the OAP homes here, and I don't think there is more than a handful of staff who speak any English - let alone specialised English for nursing care. The local one where my parents were has none whatsoever (btw 80% are French frontaliers).
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Old 29.04.2017, 12:54
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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But English is the 2nd language of Switzerland. Everybody speaks it (unless your some Oberlander over 70)
Not here.

The local mechanic speaks Italian, German/SwissGerman and French, but no English. If he needs to look up stuff on English-language websites, I need to do it for him, as his wife and employees don't speak English either.

Same with my neighbor the journalist/radio presenter/author, and most other people I know.

The only person that I regularly speak English with (regularly means 50% of the time, otherwise French) isn't Swiss, he's from Luxembourg. There are very view Swiss that I speak English with, and most of them grew up or spent time in English speaking countries.

Tom
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Old 29.04.2017, 13:03
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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Indeed- in my village I know only 4 people who speak some English, badly- and 1 who is fluent... because she is British (lived here 40+ years).

Even in the larger villages in the Valley, those who speak English are friends who have lived and worked abroad most of their life, and like us, decided to return here in retirement but still travel a lot. I know all the OAP homes here, and I don't think there is more than a handful of staff who speak any English - let alone specialised English for nursing care. The local one where my parents were has none whatsoever (btw 80% are French frontaliers).
It's the same here. There are a few villagers who speak reasonable English but most of them barely speak any at all. The ones who speak English are generally the ones who travel widely or have studied abroad.
Mind you by the time I've finished a lot more of them should be proficient.

During my recent hospital stay I don't believe there were many English speaking staff either but then my French is good enough so I never needed to find out.
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Old 29.04.2017, 14:25
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

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This is something to consider.

I heard a sad story at the Kaffeeklatsch yesterday, apparently a friend-of-a-friend-of-a-friend has been told she must leave.

The lady, non-EU and of retirement age, came here as a dependent of her EU husband. Husband died unexpectedly - which means her permit is no longer valid. She does not qualify to stay on her own.

As above, this is a friend-of-a-friend-of-a-friend story, so grain of salt and all that. But it does make one stop and think.
Indeed and something the OP must consider regarding his non-EU wife. The rules are quite clear.

"In case of divorce or death: right of foreign spouses and children to stay in Switzerland

Persons from non-EU/EFTA states

A divorced spouse’s or child’s existing residence permit may be extended provided:
•the marriage lasted at least three years in Switzerland and the spouse / family lived together,
•the persons concerned were successfully integrated in Switzerland (reputation, knowledge of the language, willingness to work) or
•important personal circumstances make it necessary to continue living in Switzerland (e.g. persecution in their home country).

You have a settlement permit (permit C)

Spouses and children over 12 years old who have come to Switzerland under the family reunification scheme obtain a settlement permit after five years of continuous residence in this country. They also have the right to settle in Switzerland following a divorce or after the spouse’s death."

https://www.ch.ch/en/right-to-reside...th-or-divorce/

And we know the Swiss government is looking at possibly making even the C permit liable to revocation/downgrading to a B if they don't consider someone integrated enough.
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Old 29.04.2017, 16:22
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Re: What's it like to retire in Switzerland?

Let me define "everybody" in our area. La Côte moves a lot: the in/out flow of foreigners and locals who leave abroad and come back. Everybody I know at work, neighbors, services, day cares, school, choir, hobby groups, fishermen, medical staff, pirates (yes, we have a club of pirates and another of moustaches) speak English. But they quickly switch to the local language when they find out the foreigner they are speaking with is not a tourist. I would say retirement would probably be easier here, with direct travel to the airport, large communities of travelled folks, etc. What is not easy here, is finding a place to live.
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