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  #21  
Old 31.12.2010, 00:34
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

Here's a tip from the German Transport Minister -just ban the mixing of languages. He has banned the use of English words at work!

'Denglish' now verboten

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...n-2171795.html
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  #22  
Old 31.12.2010, 16:04
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

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Here's a tip from the German Transport Minister -just ban the mixing of languages. He has banned the use of English words at work!

'Denglish' now verboten

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...n-2171795.html
Quote from the article "the corruption of German with words such as "handy" for mobile phone"

Handy is an English word for mobile phone? Since when? I only ever heard this usage in Switzerland & Germany.
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  #23  
Old 31.12.2010, 16:06
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

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Quote from the article "the corruption of German with words such as "handy" for mobile phone"

Handy is an English word for mobile phone? Since when? I only ever heard this usage in Switzerland & Germany.
I thought "mobile" was the international word.
"handy" might get you slapped.
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  #24  
Old 31.12.2010, 16:11
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

I always feel a bit weird using the word Handy...I always wondered what the origin was, because I've sure never heard the term used in English.

I have a hard time jumbling languages. I never have problems mixing German, but Italian and Spanish drive me nuts. I took 3 years of Spanish in high school and still hear it a lot obviously, and I've taken 3 semesters of Italian so far in college. I can't tell you how many times I get points marked off on exams for using a Spansih word! I think it's because I rarely used either one in actual conversation (mostly limited to classroom) and the two languages are so similar! I thought it'd make it easier to learn Italian having had experience with Spanish, but I feel like it's been more of a burden haha
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  #25  
Old 31.12.2010, 16:25
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

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"handy" might get you slapped.
Priceless!

From my understanding, "handy" comes from "handheld".

Personally hate the word though...

Ah, and "natel" comes from "nahe telefon“.

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  #26  
Old 05.01.2011, 21:52
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

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Quote from the article "the corruption of German with words such as "handy" for mobile phone"

Handy is an English word for mobile phone? Since when? I only ever heard this usage in Switzerland & Germany.
Handy is the "English style but actually not English at all" word Deutsche Telecom have chosen when they introduced the thing on the market. The Swiss promoted it under the name Natel.
The critic is not against English as real English Language and even less against English speaking people: the point is that German should not make up words on basis of fantasy English just for marketing reasons. The critics aim at German people doing it. And in my experience: the less a German master English, the more pseudo-English words are to be found in his/her German.
For technical language, I am not sure how far the minister's critics rich. But there is a difference between loan words, perfectly natural way of enriching any language - and creating artificially an English-sounding jargon in a given professional branch.

Short version: It's the Germans own fault, you English speakers are clear.
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  #27  
Old 06.01.2011, 08:27
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

the French did something similar back in the 70ies or 80ies... and came up with such creative words as "baladeur" in place of walkman...

I have to say that today if you say baladeur to a frenchman, he probably has no idea what you are talking about.

Ah, the purity of the language of our forefathers... (never mention the mothers).
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  #28  
Old 06.01.2011, 12:34
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

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I have to say that today if you say baladeur to a frenchman, he probably has no idea what you are talking about. .
You have a point in some cases (weekend, provider, pin-up...), but that is a bad example in that context: baladeur definitly won the battle. Walkman is over 40 language and thus uncool. Under 25 people only know mp3 players, so the lexical problem is as a burning topic as it used to be.

I am surprized how some local translations sometimes totally replace the English word (usually the one that came first, with the technical innovation). And sometimes, the English word stays for ever. There is no way to know in advance.
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  #29  
Old 06.01.2011, 12:46
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

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Handy is the "English style but actually not English at all" word Deutsche Telecom have chosen when they introduced the thing on the market. The Swiss promoted it under the name Natel.
The critic is not against English as real English Language and even less against English speaking people: the point is that German should not make up words on basis of fantasy English just for marketing reasons. The critics aim at German people doing it. And in my experience: the less a German master English, the more pseudo-English words are to be found in his/her German.
For technical language, I am not sure how far the minister's critics rich. But there is a difference between loan words, perfectly natural way of enriching any language - and creating artificially an English-sounding jargon in a given professional branch.

Short version: It's the Germans own fault, you English speakers are clear.
Thanks I wondered where the word handy came from. BTW, I worked for several telecom providers in switzerland & they all used the word Handy - nobody ever said Natel. Never worked for Swisscom; maybe they stick with Natel - no idea.
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  #30  
Old 06.01.2011, 18:49
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

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the French did something similar back in the 70ies or 80ies... and came up with such creative words as "baladeur" in place of walkman...

I have to say that today if you say baladeur to a frenchman, he probably has no idea what you are talking about.

Ah, the purity of the language of our forefathers... (never mention the mothers).
Actually regarding the word 'baladeur' it is still used extensively (just go into a shop or pick up a catalogue (e.g. from the chain FNAC); I've also heard it used in conversation). However it'll probably go extinct, being replaced by 'lecteur mp3' (mp3 player), or 'portable' (mobile phone) or even 'ipod'

Incidentally the French are just as 'bad' as the Germans when it comes to 'abusing' English vocab - e.g. un parking (car park), un smoking (black tie dinner suit / tuxedo) etc. And that reminds me - my gf has go into the habit of calling her mp3 player 'mon mp3' rather than 'mon lecteur mp3'.

Haha whereas the English (speakers) do not 'abuse' foreign words, they 'borrow' or 'absorb' them (no negative connotations!).

Great thread by the way, talk of universal grammar, language shaping or simply expressing thoughts (Sapir-Whorf hypothesis) remind me of my linguistics classes many years ago.

And I hope that all this talk of juggling and maintaining multiple languages inspires me to attempt to add Swiss German to my French and standard German (my native tongue is English).
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  #31  
Old 19.01.2011, 13:19
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Code switching

Moved here by a smartarse Mod, I didn't post it in this thread for a reason

In the absence of any interesting threads on which to post an overtly inappropriate, yet hilarious, picture, I was just pondering this phenomenon over lunch. Code switching, unless you're unfamiliar with the term, is the use in conversation of more than one language, mostly for single words, but can often be for short phrases. I'm not talking about using "deja vu" or "Doppelgänger", but rather saying to your friends "We'll meet at the Bahnhof" (or the "gare", depending which town); "What did you have for your quatre heures?"; "Mummy, my friend had a punition from the teacher". Does anyone else find themselves doing it?
My girls started doing it when they were younger, more out of necessity (not knowing the correct word in English/French), but I find myself dropping into it without thinking twice about it.
It also happens a lot at work, my colleague is French, we speak English to each other, but German or English to our other Kollegen (), so words get bandied about like nobody's business.
Just curious if this happens to anyone else (and it's lunchtime and I'm bored).
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Last edited by PaddyG; 19.01.2011 at 13:24. Reason: raging against the machine
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  #32  
Old 19.01.2011, 18:41
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Re: Tips for not mixing languages and speaking gobbledy gook

French is my MT, but having lived most of my adult life in UK, I am fully bilingual. I use both English and French all the time- and just don't even notice anymore- Like driving on left or right- you just automatically do what makes sense at the time. Might watch TV in English and write, talk or read in French at the same time, and then switch. As a teacher in the UK, I often had students making the most ridiculous excuses for not doing their homework, and my reaction would be 'my foot' whilst pointing to my eye. After years of this, one of my Tutor group asked 'why do you pint to your eye when you say my foot'. I was really surprised - but then realised I'd kept the 'normal' French gesture when saying 'mon oeil' but had naturally translated into the English expression.

Having met an English lady who live near us in CH, who had never acquired a good command of French, despite living here most of her life - and yet, had lost her good command of English, as she rarely used it- we are determined to continue to use English daily in all 4 skills (speaking, writing, listening and reading).

I've got a Degree in German and did speak it fluently, especially during my teaching exchange in Berlin. It is just not up to speed at the mo, but wouldn't take long. My priority now is to improve my Italian- I was preparing for A Level in the UK, when we moved to CH. I just love Italian.

Learning languages is one of those things that can really help fight dementia and Alzheimers. However, my mil who was bilingual English/Afrikaans- returned totally to Afrikaans as she developed Alzheimers (which was a bit of a shame as none of the staff understood her and it made her very angry. Poor thing).

Last edited by Odile; 19.01.2011 at 20:25. Reason: +info
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