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  #81  
Old 14.03.2012, 19:45
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Selbstbedienung = self service, nothing tricky there really.
I can't think of a proper word for self service in French. To serve oneself yes (se servir soi-même); but self service should be auto-service according to French logic, and it isn't - they just use the English word.

In a restaurant in the Neuchâtel Jura, a waitress once explained to me that to eat outside on the terrace, "il faut prendre sur soi". Literally "you have to take it upon yourself"... but she meant "it's self service". I think that must be a Suisse romande thing though (maybe Odile can confirm), I don't remember ever hearing it in France.
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  #82  
Old 14.03.2012, 19:50
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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No real good translation for "common sense".

Some germans say "gesunder menschenverstand" but I think the the english version is more casual and the german version seem a little direct and offensive.
Not at all. Gesunder Menschenverstand is perfectly colloquial language. That's not complex enough to qualify as complex in German.

I've said it several times here, my favorite is anwandern.
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  #83  
Old 14.03.2012, 19:53
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Same concept in German is "geschäft" lies in the past, the past particle "ge" and "schaffen" so suggests something you already have accomplished.
No, this ge- is collectivum. It's the exact same semantics as the English word. schaffen=busy (not the word, the semem)
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  #84  
Old 14.03.2012, 19:58
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Gotz No means:

1) I don't believe I've heard you come up with such a stupid, dumb, ill thought out. moronic idea/plan/suggestion.

2) You are out of your tiny little addled mind to say/suggest/ask/do that
Which is exactly what Geht's noch?! means.
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  #85  
Old 14.03.2012, 20:02
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Not at all. Gesunder Menschenverstand is perfectly colloquial language. That's not complex enough to qualify as complex in German.

I've said it several times here, my favorite is anwandern.
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No, this ge- is collectivum. It's the exact same semantics as the English word. schaffen=busy (not the word, the semem)
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Which is exactly what Geht's noch?! means.
Whats German for "multiquote button"?
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  #86  
Old 14.03.2012, 20:04
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Perhaps some of you French speaking natives can help me. I'm still struggling to find the word that corresponds to "any", as in anyplace, anywhere, anyone, etc.

I don't mean somewhere/somebody/something (quelque) and I don't mean nowhere/nobody/no one (ne...personne, nulle part).

Anybody?
It depends but you come a long way with n'importe... or à quelque... que ce soit.

1. at any place = n'importe où.
2. at any time = n'importe quand
3. in any way = n'importe comment
4. any possible person = n'importe qui
5. anyhow,... = quoi qu'il en soit...
6. any of them = n'importe sequel/laquelle/lesquels/lesquelles
7. any kind of = n'importe quel/quelle/quels/quelles
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  #87  
Old 14.03.2012, 20:19
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Whats German for "multiquote button"?
Multiverwendungzitatoptionstaste.

Simples if you have the language n'est pas?
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  #88  
Old 14.03.2012, 20:51
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Whats German for "multiquote button"?
Mehrfachzitatsschaltfläche
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  #89  
Old 14.03.2012, 20:58
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

Compound words, so common in German, such as Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübert ragungsgesetzeshüter really make my brain ache. Especially when I try to pronounce the bloody things - always end up sounding like I've got a stammer.

Even the English Forum can't quite cope with that one - I see on screen it inserts a space between some letters!

Itsalmostlikesomeonewasveryeconomicallymindedwithr egardtospacetakeninpaperinGermanyonedayanddecidedt oabolishthespacebetweenwords.
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  #90  
Old 16.03.2012, 00:10
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Whats German for "multiquote button"?
Das Tastendingsbums
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  #91  
Old 16.03.2012, 04:53
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

To me, "to lend" is ve(r)lehne and "to borrow" is uuslehne. Momoll
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  #92  
Old 19.03.2012, 17:30
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

One concept I found was hard or even impossible to translate: That was very thoughtful.
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  #93  
Old 19.03.2012, 20:06
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

well depents what you mean.

thoughtful [caring] - fürsorglich
thoughtful [attentive] - aufmerksam
thoughtful [considerate] - rücksichtsvoll
thoughtful [prudent] - umsichtig
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  #94  
Old 19.03.2012, 20:56
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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To me, "to lend" is ve(r)lehne and "to borrow" is uuslehne. Momoll
Maybe to you, as you wrote. I can easily say, "Hüt chan dr's nöd uuslehne, erscht morn," which would literally translate to, "I can't borrow it to you today, only tomorrow." Silly, I know, but it is correct in many Swiss German dialects.

Besides that, I know lots of (educated) Americans who never know when to use "to borrow" and "to lend."
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Old 19.03.2012, 21:09
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Is "I love you" a concept? Apparently Swiss can't say "ich liebe dich" because it's High German and they make do with "ich ha di gärn" ! Where is Graybeard on this?
Sorry, this Greybeard guy was up in the Alps for a while, in a place where there is no DSL. Hence the delay.

"Ich liäbe dii" is growing more and more popular among young people. I hate it because, as olygirl stated, it sounds terribly Teutonic.

There are loads of other Standard German terms that gradually infiltrate Swiss German, such as "Pferd" instead of "Ross." Of course I know that languages are not static, but as soon as I hear a teacher or radio announcer say "Ziäge" instead of "Geiss," I'll move to Lake Michigan for good.
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Old 19.03.2012, 21:14
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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I can't think of a proper word for self service in French. To serve oneself yes (se servir soi-même); but self service should be auto-service according to French logic, and it isn't - they just use the English word.

In a restaurant in the Neuchâtel Jura, a waitress once explained to me that to eat outside on the terrace, "il faut prendre sur soi". Literally "you have to take it upon yourself"... but she meant "it's self service". I think that must be a Suisse romande thing though (maybe Odile can confirm), I don't remember ever hearing it in France.
Golly, no, never ever heard that. Sounds like a direct translation from another language- did she have a strange accent (well, stranger than Neuchatel ) - in French 'self'service' is usually translated as 'self'. Like, "Monsieur, c'est un 'self' ici.
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Old 19.03.2012, 21:22
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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There are loads of other Standard German terms that gradually infiltrate Swiss German, such as "Pferd" instead of "Ross." .
It's the same in Germany. The dialect local words are replaced by standard high German. Germans complain about the exact same thing.
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Old 19.03.2012, 21:33
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

Same in UK, and I guess pretty well most places with mondialisation. Languages disappear fast and local dialects/patois even faster. Kids around here do not have the pronounced Neuchatel accent I had as a kid.
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Old 19.03.2012, 21:37
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

Interesting thread. I was just reading a theory on how the language you speak affects your ability to save money.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...rticle2356566/

Apparently it's got to do with how the language distinguishes between present and future.
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Old 19.03.2012, 21:52
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Re: Are there any "concepts" that the Swiss don't have in the language?

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Interesting thread. I was just reading a theory on how the language you speak affects your ability to save money.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...rticle2356566/

Apparently it's got to do with how the language distinguishes between present and future.
Some very strange assumptions on the part of the researcher.

"An English speaker, announcing his intention to get in shape, says “I will go running this evening.” The words “will go” mean “not now, later.” A Mandarin speaker, however, would say “I... this evening ... go running”. The verb form is the same for running now and running later; the words “this evening” make it obvious when the running will take place. It is not that Mandarin speakers do not have ways of expressing future intentions or past happenings. Rather, Mandarin does not force its speakers to distinguish between past and present, now and later -- and, as such, does not encourage sloth."

I think we can safely say "I am going running this evening," which would make his arguments invalid.
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