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  #21  
Old 02.04.2012, 22:56
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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Did you ask for 'un renversé'? Not a term used generally in Romandie - mor likely to ask for 'un café au lait'.
Oh - then Delémont is just plain weird because I asked for a café au lait and she looked at me puzzled, so I tried "un grand café - avec du lait chaud" and she replied "oh un renversé"

Perhaps she was translating it into French French for me??
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  #22  
Old 02.04.2012, 22:58
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Re: swiss french words!!!

ahaha - most waitresses in the area are in fact French frontalières- which would explain this. We stopped on the way back from Neuchatel tonight, in a restaurant on the way. The waitress came over and spoke in English- she said she was from Lyon and had arrived a few days earlier. She said she could understand English a lot better than the locals, bless her.
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  #23  
Old 02.04.2012, 22:58
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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Did you ask for 'un renversé'? Not a term used generally in Romandie - mor likely to ask for 'un café au lait'.

In Vaud it is "un renversé"
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  #24  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:01
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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In Vaud it is "un renversé"
I went back into the café in the afternoon (son was doing a trial day at his new school so I was hanging about ..) and decided to avoid all confusion by asking for a Café Latte that was listed on the menu. It came but luke warm (well practically cold) so was it just badly made or was she trying to do me a frappé (it was during the cold spell of weather so not exactly frappé drinking weather ..)
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  #25  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:02
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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Une chope (de l'alsacien schoppe qui signifie « grand verre à bière ») est un récipient, un gobelet cylindrique, muni d'une anse, dans lequel on boit généralement de la bière. Elle peut être en bois, en terre cuite, en grès, en métal (zinc, étain), en porcelaine, ou en émail, mais on la trouve généralement en verre et est donc un type de verre à bière.

(wikipedia)
La chope had a very strange etymological career. Originally it came from German "schöpfen" (= to scoop, to ladle) and meant a quantity measured by scooping. The Middle German word schõpe (= measuring scoop -- [same etymology also here, by the way!], especially for brewers) got adopted by French in the 12th century, where it became la chopine. In its Lotharingian form, la chopenne, it found its way back into the south-western German dialects around 400 years later, where it's still alive and kicking. A Schoppen is not only a measure for beer but also a baby bottle incl. its content.
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  #26  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:03
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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In Vaud it is "un renversé"
In Geneva too we say renversé et huitante aussi....we have much more bizarre vocabulary in Geneva
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  #27  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:06
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Re: swiss french words!!!

And then you have the verb 'choper' slang for 'to catch', like

j'ai chopé la crève = I've caught the lurgy (cold/flu).
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  #28  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:21
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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And then you have the verb 'choper' slang for 'to catch', like

j'ai chopé la crève = I've caught the lurgy (cold/flu).
Watch out how you use "choper" in Paris though.. it means to catch the object of your affection

Ahem.... Gex.. the "X" is pronounced.

My favorites:
5, 10 or 100 balles = Swiss Francs
T'as pas 10 balles ?

Or
T'es complètement reuillé ! (spelling ?)
You're nuts (negative)

Il reuille = it's raining

Il n'y a pas de lézards = no problem

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  #29  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:26
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Re: swiss french words!!!

my favorite swiss frenchism, si jamais. my french family giggles. now my son translates some things french to english, and in english has been using 'if ever'. 'i'll take 2 francs with me, if ever'

i really love vaudois french. learned so much french with the old folks in my building, and love when my friends put on the old timey drawl of vaudois french... it's quite charming, especially compared to the peck peck peck of chicken-y parisian french...
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  #30  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:33
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Re: swiss french words!!!

Then we have "il n'y a pas le feu au lac" to mean there is no rush/urgency to whatever is being proposed.

Or another favorite for the rhetorical question. "ou bien?" at the end of the phrase.
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  #31  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:37
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Re: swiss french words!!!

it's Canette not canet, which means an aluminium can. And what is in the aluminium can is described as a "binch", which is beer (probably from Swiss German).

Then for cleaning the mess up: "tu fais la poutze avec la panosse?" "are you doing the cleaning with the mop?".

There's a couple of words for partying/heavy drinking: Vaud has "la ronce" and "la biture" and Neuchâtel has "la noce". You can use these as verbs, too: roncer, se biturer and nocer.

Swiss French also like to add "ou bien?" at the end of questions, which can mean "or not". The French like to mock this.

Another useful one is the "carnotzet" which is the wine cellar.
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  #32  
Old 02.04.2012, 23:41
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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Then we have "il n'y a pas le feu au lac" to mean there is no rush/urgency to whatever is being proposed.

Or another favorite for the rhetorical question. "ou bien?" at the end of the phrase.
yes. ou bien, there is one i hear constantly
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  #33  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:00
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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and for a cornet/corner (i guessed this was bag, it was at a food stall at the market)
Even in France there are regional variations on this one.... "un sac" or "un sachet" would be standard, but in the south-west it's "une poche".

All these local variations on very common everyday words are fascinating, I think. I remember being amazed when I first got here that two towns that are only 60 km apart (Lausanne and Neuchâtel) have a different word for something as basic as the number 80.
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  #34  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:02
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Re: swiss french words!!!

In popular Romand or French for that matter 'il n'y a pas' is never used but replaced by 'y'a pas'

'Y'a pas l'feu au lac'

Spelling is really irrelevant in Romand slang - but it is 'roillé' or 'royé' for 'nuts/crazy' and 'il roille' for it's raining hard.
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  #35  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:03
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Re: swiss french words!!!

Of course the Brits even use the same medieval counting system as the French - the score = 20. As in 'he's reached 3 scores and 10' = 70.
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  #36  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:06
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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In popular Romand or French for that matter 'il n'y a pas' is never used but replaced by 'y'a pas'

'Y'a pas l'feu au lac'
There I was trying to give my best written version of the expression (rather than the oral one). Oh well
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  #37  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:09
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Re: swiss french words!!!

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And how do they pronounce sex, is it "say"?
Yes... it means a rock or a cliff in dialect I think.

There's a place on the map near the Tzeusier dam in Valais called "Le Pro du Sex", which always makes me laugh - although the meaning of its name is nothing more risqué than "the field by the rock" or something like that.
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  #38  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:12
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Re: swiss french words!!!

One last one before I call it a night.

Le cagibi (le placard in French French). A small storage closet found in older homes.

Pronounced a bit like "Ka Jee Bee" as if three initials.
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  #39  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:14
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Re: swiss french words!!!

.... ohh, .... and when in a restaurant, I wouldn't advise asking for a serviette.
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  #40  
Old 03.04.2012, 00:17
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Re: swiss french words!!!

And of course 'le galetas' instead of 'le grenier' (the attic).

Plenty of Swiss German words too, but changed to be more Romand. Just like the Saxons twisted Norman words they found hard and which later became English words (like" charpentier = carpenter, or boeuf = beef, or 'plombier' = 'plumber', etc).

le fatre = der Vater = the father
la muttre = die Mutter = the mother
poutzer = putzen = to clean
le spricre = das Pferd = the horse, etc. Not the prettiest of Romands words.

Serviette for a napkin is quite correct actually. (serviette hygiénique being a sanatory towel of course).
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