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  #81  
Old 21.01.2017, 16:53
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Think I might have the answer to this. At my primary school, the name on the overhead metal toilet cistern was 'Waterloo' and the toilet bowl had 'Thos.Crapper' written into the enamel.
It was always Armitage Shanks when I was growing up.
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  #82  
Old 21.01.2017, 17:05
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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It was always Armitage Shanks when I was growing up.
It was where I grew up too.
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  #83  
Old 22.01.2017, 12:32
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Do you use an eraser or a rubber (snicker, snicker)? It seems here they teach "rubber" instead of an eraser (or at least our teacher does)...and I can just imagine the faces should my little ones ask anyone for a rubber in N America.
The complete German term is Radiergummi, from (aus)radieren (erase) and Gummi (gum). But people are lazy so they colloquially shorten to Gummi. This also applies to Swiss German.

In Swiss German the verb describing its usage is "gümele", I think there's no direct equivalent in Standard German.

Ok, let you get BTT now.
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  #84  
Old 22.01.2017, 12:53
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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The complete German term is Radiergummi, from (aus)radieren (erase) and Gummi (gum). But people are lazy so they colloquially shorten to Gummi. This also applies to Swiss German.

In Swiss German the verb describing its usage is "gümele", I think there's no direct equivalent in Standard German.

Ok, let you get BTT now.
Actually you can translate "Gummi" to rubber.
And in Swissgerman a "Gummi" is as well an eraser as it is a condom in slang.
So same thing actually as in English
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  #85  
Old 22.01.2017, 13:00
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

...and a Gümmeler is a cyclist, particularly one who rides close behind the others = 'Drafting'!
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  #86  
Old 22.01.2017, 13:22
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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It was always Armitage Shanks when I was growing up.
That's what we had at home, but my primary school dated from the late 1800's. There's a decent piece on the origins of the word that shows both origins given in this thread are correct. I'd heard the 'gardyloo' explanation on a guided tour of Edinburgh.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/ex...f-the-word-loo

Had a look online and all I can find that resembles the fittings we had at my primary school...
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  #87  
Old 22.01.2017, 13:22
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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And in Swissgerman a "Gummi" is as well an eraser as it is a condom in slang.
So same thing actually as in English
Right. A slogan of one of the first national AIDS prevention poster campaigns was, "Im Minimum en Gummi drum."

The one I liked most was, "Ohne Dings kein Bums." First time I saw it I was driving to Zurich Airport, on Hardbrücke. I laughed so hard I almost rear-ended another car.
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  #88  
Old 22.01.2017, 14:35
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

Actually I started using EF for exactly this reason that I was losing my English, EF helps me a lot

Plus reading English newspapers.

But I rarely speak English so I wonder if my pronunciation is drifting
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  #89  
Old 22.01.2017, 14:58
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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That's what we had at home, but my primary school dated from the late 1800's. There's a decent piece on the origins of the word that shows both origins given in this thread are correct. I'd heard the 'gardyloo' explanation on a guided tour of Edinburgh.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/ex...f-the-word-loo

Had a look online and all I can find that resembles the fittings we had at my primary school...
The "Thos.Crapper" bit is missing. Thank heavens for little iPhones to capture history nowadays.
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  #90  
Old 22.01.2017, 15:02
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Actually I started using EF for exactly this reason that I was losing my English, EF helps me a lot

Plus reading English newspapers.

But I rarely speak English so I wonder if my pronunciation is drifting
When you start saying "yes yes" you know you'll be taken for a Swiss talking English
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  #91  
Old 22.01.2017, 17:43
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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When you start saying "yes yes" you know you'll be taken for a Swiss talking English
Yes yes, and then add, "I haven't been abroad since ten years."
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  #92  
Old 22.01.2017, 21:41
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Yes yes, and then add, "I haven't been abroad since ten years."
I do trip over the "since" thing too sometimes, I admit.
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  #93  
Old 22.01.2017, 23:41
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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I do trip over the "since" thing too sometimes, I admit.
I don't think I have that kind of problem, but I'm sure I sometimes mess up quite a few other things, big time.
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  #94  
Old 23.01.2017, 13:27
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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What I also find interesting is where it is necessary to use a German word in an English sentence because a suitable word does not exist in English. For example "Schadenfreude". In this case, is because the concept of taking pleasure at someone else's misfortune is alien to the English culture, and so no word is required to express it.
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Ever see Avenue Q?

I have to agree with Jobsrobertsharpii, even though I *haven't* seen Avenue Q. "Schadenfreude" may not be a common English word, but it used often enough to become part of the English language and you can find it in any dictionary.
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  #95  
Old 23.01.2017, 13:43
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

@me-anon
<<What I also find interesting is where it is necessary to use a German word in an English sentence because a suitable word does not exist in English. For example "Schadenfreude". In this case, is because the concept of taking pleasure at someone else's misfortune is alien to the English culture, and so no word is required to express it. >>
yeah, right, the Brits of all people

What I wonder about is the word "kindergarten", in English it's even written with a k = not at all adapted. How did that word get into the English langauge?
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  #96  
Old 23.01.2017, 16:09
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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What I wonder about is the word "kindergarten", in English it's even written with a k = not at all adapted. How did that word get into the English langauge?
How should it be spelled in your book? Cindergarten?
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  #97  
Old 23.01.2017, 16:11
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

My brain purged the English for Rucola.
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Old 23.01.2017, 16:31
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

Rocket
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Old 23.01.2017, 16:38
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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My brain purged the English for Rucola.
Arugula
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  #100  
Old 23.01.2017, 17:05
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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How should it be spelled in your book? Cindergarten?
Tindergarten of course
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