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  #101  
Old 23.01.2017, 17:22
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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How should it be spelled in your book? Cindergarten?
Nursery or Reception.
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  #102  
Old 23.01.2017, 17:39
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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It was always Armitage Shanks when I was growing up.
Sorry, but took a while until the penny dropped
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  #103  
Old 23.01.2017, 18:03
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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My brain purged the English for Rucola.
Didn't even exist in the UK when I first came here so Rucola is the only word for it I ever knew.
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  #104  
Old 23.01.2017, 19:35
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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@me-anon
<<What I also find interesting is where it is necessary to use a German word in an English sentence because a suitable word does not exist in English. For example "Schadenfreude". In this case, is because the concept of taking pleasure at someone else's misfortune is alien to the English culture, and so no word is required to express it. >> yeah, right, the Brits of all people
Words we English speakers like to forget are "to gloat" and "gloating" which are just as ugly as Schadenfreude...
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  #105  
Old 23.01.2017, 19:37
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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How should it be spelled in your book? Cindergarten?
Okay, you got me. Kindergarden I meant of course, yet - also of course, now that you pointed it out - it lacks the logic too.
Although my way (kinder garden) it would at least have some kind of meaning in English. Although the wrong one.
And please don't ask me kinder than what garden .... gosh, I give up. LOL.

So how the hell did Kindergarten get into the English language?!
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  #106  
Old 23.01.2017, 19:59
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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So how the hell did Kindergarten get into the English language?!
It was the bloody Americans!

http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/cgi/vi...&context=sferc
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  #107  
Old 23.01.2017, 20:06
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Okay, you got me. Kindergarden I meant of course, yet - also of course, now that you pointed it out - it lacks the logic too.
Although my way (kinder garden) it would at least have some kind of meaning in English. Although the wrong one.
And please don't ask me kinder than what garden .... gosh, I give up. LOL.

So how the hell did Kindergarten get into the English language?!
Surely Children's Garden makes more sense, why only translate one word?
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  #108  
Old 23.01.2017, 20:13
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Okay, you got me. Kindergarden I meant of course, yet - also of course, now that you pointed it out - it lacks the logic too.
Although my way (kinder garden) it would at least have some kind of meaning in English. Although the wrong one.
And please don't ask me kinder than what garden .... gosh, I give up. LOL.

So how the hell did Kindergarten get into the English language?!
Actually, I've heard English-speakers (including in their own countries) refer to "kindergarden" -- it's quite common. A quick google of "kindergarden" reveals 2.69 million results -- most of them appearing to be people asking whether the spelling with the d or the t is correct.
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  #109  
Old 24.01.2017, 11:48
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Okay, you got me. Kindergarden I meant of course, yet - also of course, now that you pointed it out - it lacks the logic too.
Although my way (kinder garden) it would at least have some kind of meaning in English. Although the wrong one.
And please don't ask me kinder than what garden .... gosh, I give up. LOL.

So how the hell did Kindergarten get into the English language?!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kindergarten#Spread
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  #110  
Old 24.01.2017, 12:02
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Nursery or Reception.
Crèche
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  #111  
Old 24.01.2017, 12:45
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Sorry, but took a while until the penny dropped
My Nan always used the euphemism "to spend a penny" for going to the toilet.

Relevant as its probably a forgotten English phrase.

Like, a penny for your thoughts.

Never look a gift horse in the mouth.

Never a borrower nor a lender be.

Waste not, want not.

She was Scottish

Last edited by TobiasM; 24.01.2017 at 14:33.
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  #112  
Old 24.01.2017, 12:46
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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So how the hell did Kindergarten get into the English language?!
English is merely a mixture of Latin and German.
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  #113  
Old 24.01.2017, 12:47
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

Oh dear. Certainly not forgotten by me. I still use those phrases.
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  #114  
Old 24.01.2017, 13:11
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Oh dear. Certainly not forgotten by me. I still use those phrases.
So do I, and my kids!
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  #115  
Old 24.01.2017, 13:29
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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Oh dear. Certainly not forgotten by me. I still use those phrases.
So do I, and many more too.
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  #116  
Old 24.01.2017, 14:04
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

I find it really interesting that we still use phrases today that don’t have a relevant meaning anymore. For example, ‘to dial a number’, harking back to the days of the rotary telephones. Or, ‘to hang up’ from when once upon a time, phones were made up of two pieces, attached to the wall, and we had to physically hang the receiver on the base to end a call. Or even when we say ‘online’, reminding us of a time when we had to plug in the computer to the telephone line and dial-up just to get on to the internet. This brings back memories of serious frustration when all I wanted to do was make a phone call but my brother was already online. Cue: shouting, bargaining, bribing and blackmailing.
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  #117  
Old 24.01.2017, 14:31
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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My Nan always used the euphemism "to spend a penny" for going to the toilet.

Relevant as its probably a forgotten English phrase.

Like, a penny for your thoughts.

Never look a gift horse in the mouth.

Never a borrower nor a lender be.

She had a lot more my mind just went blank.
My dear old Grandad used to say "Lord love a duck!" to express surprise. No idea where that came from.
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  #118  
Old 24.01.2017, 20:39
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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I find it really interesting that we still use phrases today that don’t have a relevant meaning anymore. For example, ‘to dial a number’, harking back to the days of the rotary telephones. Or, ‘to hang up’ from when once upon a time, phones were made up of two pieces, attached to the wall, and we had to physically hang the receiver on the base to end a call. Or even when we say ‘online’, reminding us of a time when we had to plug in the computer to the telephone line and dial-up just to get on to the internet. This brings back memories of serious frustration when all I wanted to do was make a phone call but my brother was already online. Cue: shouting, bargaining, bribing and blackmailing.
ISDN-phone connection was the solution for the latter problem in Switzerland
Thanks to your post I just learnt that even that will be in the past very soon.
I keep thinking that I live in the best time ever, being a tech-gadget-freak.
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  #119  
Old 25.01.2017, 05:04
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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My Nan always used the euphemism "to spend a penny" for going to the toilet.

Relevant as its probably a forgotten English phrase.
I thought it was a French phrase since I first read it in a English-translated French mystery "The Eleventh Little Indian" by Jacquemard-Senecal. (That same book is also known as "The Eleventh Little N****r.") I assumed it was a French phrase and referred to toilets where people literally would have to spend money to use. But if that phrase is British in origin, you guys would know better than me.
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  #120  
Old 25.01.2017, 08:51
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Re: Forgotten English words and phrases

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I thought it was a French phrase since I first read it in a English-translated French mystery "The Eleventh Little Indian" by Jacquemard-Senecal. (That same book is also known as "The Eleventh Little N****r.") I assumed it was a French phrase and referred to toilets where people literally would have to spend money to use. But if that phrase is British in origin, you guys would know better than me.
Decades back, all public toilets cost 1d to use. That's one old penny, hence the phrase.
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