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  #41  
Old 22.11.2011, 17:35
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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I feel that swiss french relating to french and be compared to UK english with USA english. Some words change, but general feeling is the same.

As far as the video of MC Giroud goes, thats not patois, that is swiss french with a heavy accent. The same way an english man and an australian would have different accents, the Valais (where MC Giroud comes from) has a strong accent.

This is patois from Fribourg :



I grew up speaking french (from geneva) and I can not understand le patois fribourgois (even after 4 years there). And as you can see most of the spelling is very strange.

This is a phrase in patois fribourgois and swiss french:
"Dèvejâ in patê, lè betâ dou chèlà din cha vouê" meaning "Parler en patois, c'est mettre du soleil dans sa voix" (Speaking in patois puts sunshine in ones voice).
I just can't see the relation between the two!

French and swiss french are alike, patois is a completly different and is dying out even there are still a few people who speak the different types of patois
Yes, OK, the youtube song uses some Basse-Ville from Fribourg expressions and glues them together in a song... You may find youngsters talking like that when they are with friends, just for fun, but this is not a commonly used way of expression in Fribourg.

Your phrase "Dèvejâ in patê, lè betâ dou chèlà din cha vouê" is in patois gruyerien, but there you are in for something completely different!!!
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  #42  
Old 22.11.2011, 17:37
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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They play that, and the crowd sing along, at the end of each Fribourg-Gottéron hockey match (if they win, of course).
... which is quite often, lately, isn't it!!!
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  #43  
Old 22.11.2011, 18:35
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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I've never heard it from native French speakers (can't vouch for Alsaciens though). Certainly all banks, tourist offices, supermarkets, airports etc... use "distributeur", as does the Groupement des Cartes Bancaires CB, like here and here and here and here (do a search for "guichet automatique" on that site: "Il n'y a aucun résultat.").
The more official the wording, the more likely you are to get distributeur.
Guichet is used and familiar to me even without the automatique. To some extend, you may also have a difference Paris-Bigcities vs. countryside. Perhaps. I don't know for this word, this is just a general statement from me.

I wouldn't write guichet, though... call me a pedant French teacher, that would explain a lot.
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  #44  
Old 22.11.2011, 18:57
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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...et ceux aux langues voisines, tel poutzer.
Thanks to Marie-Thérèse Porchet, I learned that "panosse" is a serpillière, i.e. a floorcloth.
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  #45  
Old 22.11.2011, 21:22
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

One thing I've noticed as I use a translation package on the PC for a lot of things is that the Swiss have quite a few words ending in "age" which mean absolutely nothing to the translator. Nor does it understand the word "gypserie".
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  #46  
Old 22.11.2011, 21:27
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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Thanks to Marie-Thérèse Porchet, I learned that "panosse" is a serpillière, i.e. a floorcloth.
Great word that, no? BTW 'une patte' is a cloth or dishcloth, wherease in F. French it is a 'torchon'. 'Un linge' is a towel and in FF it is 'une serviette'. And 'une lavette' in Romand is a facecloth, and in FF 'un gant de toilette'.

Une lavette = une poule mouillée (wet chicken) too = a chicken or coward, lol.

And a funny Romande expression 'c'est un cousin du coté de la patte à relaver' = he is a distant cousin.
Isn't 'language' great, whichever it is.

RetiredInNH - those 'germanic Romand' words are fast disappearing too. We used 'poutzer', and also 'du Speck' (du lard/bacon), and 'un Spikre' (un cheval/horse) un Steckr (un baton/stick), and so many others, but they are rarely heard now. Also all the locals with German names used to be pronounced in the Germanic way when I was a child, but now they've all been 'franchisised'. So 'Bieler' was pronounced 'Billr' and now it is 'Bie-lair'- really funny for me.

Last edited by Odile; 22.11.2011 at 21:45.
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  #47  
Old 23.11.2011, 03:31
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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A fun article in Le Temps on this subject: La francophonie expliquée aux bedoumes:I always suspected that "natel" was strictly a Swiss word (why no idea) but "bancomat" certainly seemed a legitimate French one

Conclusion:
NATEL is of course a "Swiss word" as it originally just was an expression of Swisscom for their mobile phone service. It has now become a general expression, and instead of being pissed, they should feel flattered

BANKOMAT is NOT a French word at all but a German/Swiss-German word as in French it would be "banqueaumate" so that "bancomat" looks like a Romandie version of the Bankomat.

************************************************** *********************************************

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Just to be picky, it was the Swiss PTT.
let's not forget the old Romand joke about "what does PTT mean ?" answer : Prendre le Travail Tranquille"

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Great word that, no? BTW 'une patte' is a cloth or dishcloth, wherease in F. French it is a 'torchon'. 'Un linge' is a towel and in FF it is 'une serviette'. And 'une lavette' in Romand is a facecloth, and in FF 'un gant de toilette'.

Une lavette = une poule mouillée (wet chicken) too = a chicken or coward, lol.

And a funny Romande expression 'c'est un cousin du coté de la patte à relaver' = he is a distant cousin.
Isn't 'language' great, whichever it is.

RetiredInNH - those 'germanic Romand' words are fast disappearing too. We used 'poutzer', and also 'du Speck' (du lard/bacon), and 'un Spikre' (un cheval/horse) un Steckr (un baton/stick), and so many others, but they are rarely heard now. Also all the locals with German names used to be pronounced in the Germanic way when I was a child, but now they've all been 'franchisised'. So 'Bieler' was pronounced 'Billr' and now it is 'Bie-lair'- really funny for me.

Interesting is your thing about "Patte". The expression for sure is of French origin, was picked up in Switzerland by the army and got used as the "Pattà" which sounds ridiculous but apparently was "taken back" by the Romands.

Last edited by Wollishofener; 23.11.2011 at 03:48.
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  #48  
Old 23.11.2011, 11:10
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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Certainly all banks, tourist offices, supermarkets, airports etc... use "distributeur", as does the Groupement des Cartes Bancaires CB, like here and here and here and here (do a search for "guichet automatique" on that site: "Il n'y a aucun résultat.").
Sure, but I was talking about what people use in conversation, not the offical terminology used by banks and other institutions. In the UK the almost universal term is "cashpoint", but you probably wouldn't find that on any official document either. Same, perhaps, with "ATM" in the US.
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  #49  
Old 23.11.2011, 11:17
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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Isn't 'language' great, whichever it is.
Yes. As long as it's not French!

*growl*
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  #50  
Old 04.12.2011, 13:05
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

I live in Lausanne and if you go to Lyon, France (just two hours away) you can REALLY hear the different accent!
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  #51  
Old 04.12.2011, 14:21
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

The swiss french also have some interesting (surreal) expressions like:

"Déçu en bien" (disappointed in a good way)
"Je te tiens les pouces" (I am holding your thumbs)
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  #52  
Old 04.12.2011, 14:45
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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"Je te tiens les pouces" (I am holding your thumbs)
This comes from the Germanic tradition of holding one's thumbs for good luck ('Daumen drücken').

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Old 04.12.2011, 14:54
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

There is an old skit by french humorists Coluche and Sylvie Joly making fun of swiss accent. You'll find a lot of the typical swiss expression/attitude here.
Video is in french of course.

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  #54  
Old 04.12.2011, 15:03
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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This comes from the Germanic tradition of holding one's thumbs for good luck ('Daumen drücken').
In german it makes sense because of the way they use "dir".

In french it sounds a bit strange. More like "I am holding your thumbs".
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  #55  
Old 04.12.2011, 15:36
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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Nobody use chien chaud in Quebec.... This is all about the Office de la langue francaise. But in the reality, it's the good old Hot dog!

Bon Dieu de Tabarnak.... yeah, but I prefer the '' Ostie de Câlisse de Tabarnak''

Do not talk like that in front of older people.... ruuuuuuude!

Bienvenue is the exact translation of you're welcome ( well - bien) (venu, venir - come) It makes sense.

Nil
Not to mention that Nil is braking the Quebec French Language law Merde
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  #56  
Old 05.12.2011, 00:01
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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Not to mention that Nil is braking the Quebec French Language law Merde
I don't know whether it is a Romandie-expression or also in use in France. I only heard it in the Romandie. The expression the "Pot-de-Vin" . I at first needed a moment till I got that it was the expression for what in German is Schmiergeld (lubricating money)
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  #57  
Old 05.12.2011, 00:29
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

un pot-de-vin is a perfectly French word.
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  #58  
Old 05.12.2011, 02:40
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

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un pot-de-vin is a perfectly French word.
alright. But I found it the nicest expression for what it is I had heard in any language. Almost charming
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Old 06.12.2011, 03:22
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

when I studied French, my teacher is a French, what she said is that in wring, there is no big difference, but in expression, could be a lot
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  #60  
Old 06.12.2011, 13:36
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Re: Is Swiss French really different from French French?

Same for different regions of France though. Expressions in Franche-Comté are similar to here in the Neuchatel Jura - but very different from Paris or Marseilles.

The expression is actually 'je ME tiens les pouces (implied 'pour toi' /for you).

To the trained ear, the Fribourg, Neuchatel, Valais, Vaud and Geneva accents are quite distinctive. Like the Northern accents of the UK - Scouse, Brom, Geordie and Black country are very distinctive - but all sound the same to someone from Surrey with rp (received pronunciation).
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