Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Language corner  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 04.11.2013, 17:03
Captain Greybeard's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sarganserland / NW Lower Peninsula of NE US Midwest
Posts: 3,503
Groaned at 43 Times in 37 Posts
Thanked 7,335 Times in 2,293 Posts
Captain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond reputeCaptain Greybeard has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
Hilarious and believable but ultimately not real (if you believe wiki, that is)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightho...l_urban_legend
As some EFers may remember, I'm an active lighthouse buff, restoring an historic lighthouse in the USA. In our circles, that joke had been around since the 1980s. The oldest documented version appeared 1931 as a cartoon in the Canadian newspaper The Drumheller Review, but mentioning The Humorist of London as its source: Two officers arguing through bullhorns: A: "Where are you going with your blinking ship?" B: "This isn't a blinking ship. It's a lighthouse!" Still to the point but much shorter than the blown-up BS in the video, where one wonders, for instance, why anybody would issue a collision warning over a distance of 25 nautical miles.

By the way, even the US Navy covers the topic.
__________________

In Iran, if a 12-year-old girl is raped and impregnated by her father, she must carry the baby to term or be thrown in prison for life. Wait, sorry, no. That's Alabama.


Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Captain Greybeard for this useful post:
  #22  
Old 04.11.2013, 19:24
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: CH
Posts: 1,048
Groaned at 244 Times in 117 Posts
Thanked 698 Times in 433 Posts
Bucentaure is considered unworthyBucentaure is considered unworthyBucentaure is considered unworthy
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
I guess I am one of those strange people for whom german does, and has always sounded nicer than french, italian, spanish... so forth.
...
My guess is the nicer and sexier the speaker is, the nicer is her or his language.


Quote:
View Post
...
I really believe that the troubles of the 20th century strongly coloured the perception of the language. A fan of Victorian literature, I recall at least two authors off-hand (Charlotte Bronte, Louisa May Alcott) that refer in their works to the german language and germanic culture as poetic, sentimental.
You got that right.

With exception of the Russians view on Germany, what you were just saying was the stereotype of a German before nazism arised.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Bucentaure for this useful post:
  #23  
Old 04.11.2013, 19:28
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: AG
Posts: 93
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 51 Times in 24 Posts
Anke_ has no particular reputation at present
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Saw those a while ago and couldn't stop laughing!
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 04.11.2013, 19:33
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: At home
Posts: 4,263
Groaned at 208 Times in 133 Posts
Thanked 6,404 Times in 2,719 Posts
Faltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
I agree, absolutely; and also German words show us so much about the german culture - f.e. what's "passion" in German? "Leidenschaft" - what means "Leidenschaft" literally - " Leiden" - suffering: "schaffen" - to creat; Leidenschaft creats suffering, doen't it?
This is tea time etymology.
That's more antique culture. Passion means suffering in the first place, in latin, french, english and everywhere. The German word ist just a direct translation into Germanic words of a mediterranean concept of the antique.
The suffix -schaft has nothing to do with the verb schaffen.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Faltrad for this useful post:
  #25  
Old 04.11.2013, 19:50
MrVertigo's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 3,212
Groaned at 86 Times in 70 Posts
Thanked 5,788 Times in 2,254 Posts
MrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

I disagree with some here regarding the perception of german language as due to II WW. It did not certainly help but the perception wasn't much better before.
Already in 16th-18th century opera was only/mainly in italian and german was considered too rough to sing. German was used for the Singspiel which was more plebeian and italian was for the elite. Same was also in France where "Opéra comique" was in plain french and italian was only for the elite. It's Mozart that completely changed that perception with german followed by Wagner; and Rossini in France with french.

The romantic perception of german as language during 18-19th century is more due to the writing of Goethe than the intrinsic nature of the language.
__________________
Resist, support, donate: ACLU
They tried to bury us, they did not know that we are seeds (Mexican proverb)
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 04.11.2013, 20:49
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA, former Zurich
Posts: 2,050
Groaned at 14 Times in 14 Posts
Thanked 4,811 Times in 1,660 Posts
BokerTov has a reputation beyond reputeBokerTov has a reputation beyond reputeBokerTov has a reputation beyond reputeBokerTov has a reputation beyond reputeBokerTov has a reputation beyond reputeBokerTov has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
My guess is the nicer and sexier the speaker is, the nicer is her or his language.
You got that right. I went from "This language hurts my ears" to the below, thanks to a certain German fellow.

Although, as I previously posted on the forum, at "Meine Schatz" I had to draw the line. Following "WTF did you just call me?", we promptly substituted it with the much-easier-on-the-ears Italian version of the same endearing expression.
Attached Images
 
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 04.11.2013, 20:58
cannut's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: canada
Posts: 6,705
Groaned at 179 Times in 139 Posts
Thanked 5,878 Times in 3,235 Posts
cannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
This is tea time etymology.
That's more antique culture. Passion means suffering in the first place, in latin, french, english and everywhere. The German word ist just a direct translation into Germanic words of a mediterranean concept of the antique.
The suffix -schaft has nothing to do with the verb schaffen.
Every male knows that
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank cannut for this useful post:
  #28  
Old 04.11.2013, 20:59
MrVertigo's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 3,212
Groaned at 86 Times in 70 Posts
Thanked 5,788 Times in 2,254 Posts
MrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
Every male knows that
confusing suffix and appendix?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank MrVertigo for this useful post:
  #29  
Old 04.11.2013, 21:11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: St Elsewhere
Posts: 332
Groaned at 15 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 320 Times in 151 Posts
Brass427 has earned the respect of manyBrass427 has earned the respect of manyBrass427 has earned the respect of many
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
Haha! A love of the german language, I guess.

I think that comment illustrates nicely that our perception of a language is in part influenced by cultural experience or bias. For me, my perception of german is no doubt coloured by my family experiences. Also, I am simply not taken with the fluidity of latin languages as most people are... To me, french sounds every bit as "gutteral" as german ever has, and when I listen to Italian it seems the speakers are always one step away from coming to blows. Spanish, meh. Now, really the most lovely language to my ears is japanese... I would love to learn it but feel I could never do it justice...
Agree completely.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 05.11.2013, 08:46
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 26,542
Groaned at 1,642 Times in 1,262 Posts
Thanked 30,742 Times in 14,686 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
at "Meine Schatz" I had to draw the line
How about "Schatzeli", then?

Persoanlly, I use "tesorina".

When my wife says "tesoro", it's usually not a good sign.

Tom
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 05.11.2013, 09:05
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Zürich
Posts: 23
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts
eliasbaum has become a little unpopulareliasbaum has become a little unpopular
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
This is tea time etymology.
That's more antique culture. Passion means suffering in the first place, in latin, french, english and everywhere. The German word ist just a direct translation into Germanic words of a mediterranean concept of the antique.
The suffix -schaft has nothing to do with the verb schaffen.
I am sorry, but the suffix -schaft has to do with the verb schaffen, means actually "made from" - f.e. Mannschaft (team) - several men together
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 05.11.2013, 12:16
flavio's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Winterthur
Posts: 764
Groaned at 69 Times in 40 Posts
Thanked 612 Times in 343 Posts
flavio has an excellent reputationflavio has an excellent reputationflavio has an excellent reputationflavio has an excellent reputation
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
Haha! A love of the german language, I guess.

I think that comment illustrates nicely that our perception of a language is in part influenced by cultural experience or bias.
I suppose I'll have to go to the German School to appreciate the wonders of it.

Reply With Quote
The following 7 users would like to thank flavio for this useful post:
  #33  
Old 05.11.2013, 12:34
M_McPoyle's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ZG
Posts: 343
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 1,138 Times in 283 Posts
M_McPoyle has a reputation beyond reputeM_McPoyle has a reputation beyond reputeM_McPoyle has a reputation beyond reputeM_McPoyle has a reputation beyond reputeM_McPoyle has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Oh dear, that is an unfortunate sign....
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank M_McPoyle for this useful post:
  #34  
Old 05.11.2013, 13:49
cannut's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: canada
Posts: 6,705
Groaned at 179 Times in 139 Posts
Thanked 5,878 Times in 3,235 Posts
cannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond reputecannut has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

[QUOTE=Faltrad;2012250]This is tea time etymology.
That's more antique culture. Passion means suffering in the first place, in latin, french, english and everywhere. The German word ist just a direct translation into Germanic words of a mediterranean concept of the antique.
The suffix -schaft has nothing to do with the verb schaffen.[/QUOTE]

On the other hand there is a connection between schaft and geschaft
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 05.11.2013, 13:59
Pancakes's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 2,908
Groaned at 94 Times in 64 Posts
Thanked 4,535 Times in 1,806 Posts
Pancakes has a reputation beyond reputePancakes has a reputation beyond reputePancakes has a reputation beyond reputePancakes has a reputation beyond reputePancakes has a reputation beyond reputePancakes has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
Did you know, that in Italian dog schools the dogs learn german. It's the best language for giving commands...
That wouldn't surprise me.

Whenever my cat is doing something naughty, and I shout "Kiki, no!" she doesn't listen. But if I shout "Kiki, nein!" she scurries off like a bat out of hell. (Seriously).
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 05.11.2013, 17:29
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: At home
Posts: 4,263
Groaned at 208 Times in 133 Posts
Thanked 6,404 Times in 2,719 Posts
Faltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond reputeFaltrad has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
I am sorry, but the suffix -schaft has to do with the verb schaffen, means actually "made from" - f.e. Mannschaft (team) - several men together
Th link is purely historical,you can not translate a modern German word based on the meaning of the verb. That semantic lonk got lost thousand years ago.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Faltrad for this useful post:
  #37  
Old 05.11.2013, 19:51
MrVertigo's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 3,212
Groaned at 86 Times in 70 Posts
Thanked 5,788 Times in 2,254 Posts
MrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond reputeMrVertigo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

-schaft is like -ship or -hood in english. It reflects the organization or community or group function.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank MrVertigo for this useful post:
  #38  
Old 05.11.2013, 20:08
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 26,542
Groaned at 1,642 Times in 1,262 Posts
Thanked 30,742 Times in 14,686 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: How German sounds compared to other languages

Quote:
View Post
Oh dear, that is an unfortunate sign....
Hilarious, actually!

Tom
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
compare, german, language, stereotypes




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
German Homes Plain Compared to the French Ones Cavalier Housing in general 2 29.09.2011 11:27
how easy is it to get a work permit compared to germany? poto Permits/visas/government 1 22.05.2010 15:51
Academic standard compared to other countries OZHK Family matters/health 5 25.11.2008 23:17


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 14:46.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0