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Old 27.09.2014, 21:43
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18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

For those of you who are learning German.

http://www.fluentu.com/german/blog/w...ds-vocabulary/

I am sure there is a Swiss German list some place as well.
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Old 27.09.2014, 21:55
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

If I could speak German I'm sure I would be using most of them
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Old 27.09.2014, 23:01
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

Innerer Schweinehund, i have a couple of those, one for cooking, one for cleaning..
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Old 27.09.2014, 23:13
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

Sounds pretty daily words to me. But I don't think that English or other languages are not able to express exactly the same (a double negative, I know, so pay attention), they just don't do it with one word. Word being arbitrary units, one can do the same list with any language in any direction, including English - it just happens to be other words. Which "strange" words were invented in which language is just pure chance.

Sometimes, a good idea makes career (Ein guter Einfall wird zum Erfolg, une bonne idée fait son chemin) and figurative language become a recorded word or phrase. Other times, it is the inherent lexical/sytactic rules of a language that makes it one word in a language and not in another. F. ex., "I love you" is only one word in Hungarian (szeretlek) and five words in Ladin Romansh (eu n'ha jent a tai) - so what? In each case, the linguistic system was respected to the letter, the result is determined independently of the meaning by purely formal grammatical rules. There is no inherent value attached to a sign, so no predetermination for any language to by able to say anything specific in one word rather than two, three, five or more.
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Old 27.09.2014, 23:20
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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For those of you who are learning German.

http://www.fluentu.com/german/blog/w...ds-vocabulary/

I am sure there is a Swiss German list some place as well.
not being a native German speaker, I am using 6 out of 18.
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Old 27.09.2014, 23:50
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

So don´t see why somebody should be astonished, they are everyday generic expressions.
Try getting the meaning for "Muggesäckle" if you want crazy.
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Old 28.09.2014, 00:58
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

I can relate to "Treppen Witz" .FFs put some nickers on
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Old 28.09.2014, 09:01
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

I only knew the first two, and never thought of them as odd. I remember a German colleague who found the expression "In the middle of nowhere" quite amusing - he'd never heard it before, but he said its meaning was perfectly clear. I forget the German equivalent - something to do with where the foxes and rabbits play.

I think some words in some language may not have direct equivalents in other languages; even equivalent phrases. Word meanings come from their usage, and their usage is modified by cultural norms. I maintain that German does not have a word or phrase that is exactly equivalent to "courtesy", since what I as an Englishman understand as courtesy appears not to exist in Germanic culture (at least, South Germanic and Swiss culture!).

I think this is a good thing, as learning a new language exposes you in a way to different cultural norms, and so widens your horizons. It also means that losing a human language is a tragedy.

My favourite German word that doesn't (yet) exist in English (with the same meaning) is "performant", relating to IT systems.
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Old 28.09.2014, 10:13
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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Sounds pretty daily words to me. But I don't think that English or other languages are not able to express exactly the same (a double negative, I know, so pay attention), they just don't do it with one word. Word being arbitrary units, one can do the same list with any language in any direction, including English - it just happens to be other words. Which "strange" words were invented in which language is just pure chance.
Actually the bavarian/swabian dialect allows for double negatives or even treble negatives: "Noi, koi brood hend mer ned" (no, no bread have we not) aaand it´s "der" Butter and not "die" Butter. (dr budder)
Still waiting for somebody to ask what the hell a "Muggesäckle" is, Slammer loves Swabian.
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Old 28.09.2014, 11:25
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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Actually the bavarian/swabian dialect allows for double negatives or even treble negatives:
Double negative with single negative meaning was normal up to the early Renaissance in German. I think Afrikaans kept it. In Low-German, one still has to add "nie" or "nich" when one uses the negatives like "keen, nüms etc."
Double negatives in the contemporary meaning of it in English and German means that the sentence actually is positive. This is what I was referring to in my bad English.
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Old 28.09.2014, 11:51
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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Still waiting for somebody to ask what the hell a "Muggesäckle" is, Slammer loves Swabian.
OK, I'll bite.

My friend Google asked if I meant 'Muggeseggele' - is it the same thing?
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Old 28.09.2014, 12:10
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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OK, I'll bite.

My friend Google asked if I meant 'Muggeseggele' - is it the same thing?
Yes it is. It's very popular in Swiss German too.
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Old 28.09.2014, 12:42
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

Go on, what does it mean?

I like "Treppenwitz", it's more compact than "l'esprit d'escalier" and you'd need a whole sentence to express the same idea in English.
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Old 28.09.2014, 13:36
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

It means a male mosquito's genitals and is used as a synonym for a minute amount or a tiny thing.
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Old 28.09.2014, 14:55
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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Go on, what does it mean?

I like "Treppenwitz", it's more compact than "l'esprit d'escalier" and you'd need a whole sentence to express the same idea in English.
Ah yes, the bane of my existence. Or more precisely, 'Treppendeutsch'.

After most conversations in German it is only after I've walked down the stairs and out the door that I realize that I what I meant was not what I said, that the other person probably walked away with the complete opposite impression of what I wanted to convey. It is only after playing the conversation over and over in my head that I finally get it right... far too late.

Can I have a do-over of the last 15 years?
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Old 28.09.2014, 22:24
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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It means a male mosquito's genitals and is used as a synonym for a minute amount or a tiny thing.
Good answer but not completly correct, a Mugg is the term for anything fly-ish, that is why you have a "Muggebatscher" translates as Fly-splatter.
A mosquito would be a Schnoog.
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Old 28.09.2014, 23:16
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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Good answer but not completly correct, a Mugg is the term for anything fly-ish, that is why you have a "Muggebatscher" translates as Fly-splatter.
A mosquito would be a Schnoog.
"Ä Muggi / Mugge" is a mosquito, directly related to Standard German "Mücke." You can kill a mosquito with a fly swatter, too, after all, and not even your Swiss neighbor will report you to the police. But in most Swiss German dialects, your "Muggebatscher" is called "Flüügetätscher" anyway.

In most Swiss German dialects, a "Schnoogg / Schnaagg" (S.G. "Schnake") is a crane fly, a.k.a. a mosquito eater, johnny spinner, mosquito hawk, gallinipper, gollywhopper and many other regional terms. In many parts of the English speaking world, they are also known as daddy-long-legs, whereas in most parts of the USA, that term is normally used for harvest spiders and cellar spiders.

Granted, there are a few Swiss German dialects, Lummerlandish for instance, that sometimes use "Schnaagg" for a big mosquito too, but that is not the norm. It's just a lack of zoological knowledge.

By the way, when the relationship between me and my American OH still was in the Internet romance phase, with us connected across the Atlantic only by email, chat and telephone, I once mentioned I had heard a strange sound in the other room and, upon inspection, found a daddy-long-leg circling the ceiling lamp. She was like, "WHAT?!? Your daddy-long-legs do FLY?!?"
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Old 29.09.2014, 11:17
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

Bauchgefuhl is missing in from the list (imho) and this idiom would appear very strange were it not for the identical one in the English language
Ger: Bauchgefuhl Eng: gut feeling (intuition)

A similar one is "Da liegt der Hund begraben" but there is no direct literal equivalent in English. I was was once participating in telephone conference with some Swiss and and American company. One of the Swiss, who had a very good command of English, in saying that a particular course of action would lead to the discovery of the issue we were then discussing, went on to say: "Then we will find out where the dog is buried". It caused uproar "whose dog?", "what happened to it?" etc. and the remainder of the discussion was interspersed with jocular references to the dog.
Ger: "Da liegt der Hund begraben" Eng: "The dog is buried there" (Idiom: The root of the problem)
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Old 29.09.2014, 11:35
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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Bauchgefuhl is missing in from the list (imho) and this idiom would appear very strange were it not for the identical one in the English language
Ger: Bauchgefuhl Eng: gut feeling (intuition)
One of my recent 'Treppendeutsch' experiences involved my misuse of Bauchgefuhl.

I was trying to describe stomach pain and said 'Bauchgefuhl'. After ruminating later over my inability to communicate effectively with the doctor I realized that he thought I was saying I was only guessing that something was wrong, so he naturally didn't take me seriously.

Idioms can be dangerous for those of us whose German is imperfect.
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Old 29.09.2014, 19:43
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Re: 18 Weird German Words You Won’t Believe Exist

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"Ä Muggi / Mugge" is a mosquito, directly related to Standard German "Mücke." You can kill a mosquito with a fly swatter, too, after all, and not even your Swiss neighbor will report you to the police. But in most Swiss German dialects, your "Muggebatscher" is called "Flüügetätscher" anyway.

In most Swiss German dialects, a "Schnoogg / Schnaagg" (S.G. "Schnake") is a crane fly, a.k.a. a mosquito eater, johnny spinner, mosquito hawk, gallinipper, gollywhopper and many other regional terms. In many parts of the English speaking world, they are also known as daddy-long-legs, whereas in most parts of the USA, that term is normally used for harvest spiders and cellar spiders.

Granted, there are a few Swiss German dialects, Lummerlandish for instance, that sometimes use "Schnaagg" for a big mosquito too, but that is not the norm. It's just a lack of zoological knowledge.

By the way, when the relationship between me and my American OH still was in the Internet romance phase, with us connected across the Atlantic only by email, chat and telephone, I once mentioned I had heard a strange sound in the other room and, upon inspection, found a daddy-long-leg circling the ceiling lamp. She was like, "WHAT?!? Your daddy-long-legs do FLY?!?"
You must be a Saupreiß Kapitän Graubart, simply too much detail for us poor Bazi´s to process, for us a "Mugg" is anything that can fly up and around a cows ares in summer.


by the way...:
Woman strolls around the Dult in Augschburg and schtopps at a stall selling veggies...

"Häänd Ir no a Dill do?

"Noi, häänd I it!" Says the guy..

"Ohber nemmt´S soera laang´a Gürk´n, de dud´s aa."

Last edited by slammer; 29.09.2014 at 20:12.
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