Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Language corner
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 31.01.2018, 20:21
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ostschweiz
Posts: 5,153
Groaned at 160 Times in 135 Posts
Thanked 6,569 Times in 3,373 Posts
Urs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

BTT.

OP, a simple translation won't do for the text to make sense to you and your country(wo)men. Instead you probably need a lot of context, a glossary if you will.

Now, your text was authored by one Hans Kläui. He died in 1992 but there's a club called "Friends of the Paul Kläui Library", Paul was his brother. The club aims to keep local history history in people's memory, they may be able to help you.
Reply With Quote
The following 6 users would like to thank Urs Max for this useful post:
  #42  
Old 31.01.2018, 20:43
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
BTT.

OP, a simple translation won't do for the text to make sense to you and your country(wo)men. Instead you probably need a lot of context, a glossary if you will.
Very true. I've found it necessary to explain certain words, etc. in the translating I've done, starting that glossary.
Quote:
Now, your text was authored by one Hans Kläui. He died in 1992 but there's a club called "Friends of the Paul Kläui Library", Paul was his brother. The club aims to keep local history history in people's memory, they may be able to help you.
Wonderful idea! I will definitely try that!
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 01.02.2018, 09:38
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ostschweiz
Posts: 5,153
Groaned at 160 Times in 135 Posts
Thanked 6,569 Times in 3,373 Posts
Urs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Very true. I've found it necessary to explain certain words, etc. in the translating I've done, starting that glossary.
Feel free to ask. The people from that club probably are in a much better position to answer, but it may a simple one that can be answered easily by laymen.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 03.02.2018, 04:54
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
BTT.

OP, a simple translation won't do for the text to make sense to you and your country(wo)men. Instead you probably need a lot of context, a glossary if you will.
Yeah, here's an example, used several times in the chapter, concerning taxes and/or belongings:

3 Mütt Kernen¹
1 Fasnachthuhn
1 Malter Haber¹
2 Herbsthühner
6 Schilling Geld
30 Eier

With the following footnote:

¹Winterthurer Maß: 1 Mütt glatte Frucht zu 4 Viertel -= 96,3 Liter; 1 Malter Haber zu 4 Mütt oder 16 Viertel = 444 Liter.

This usually translates to:

3 Mütt Kernen¹ (sometimes mother cores)
1 Carnival Chickens
1 Malter Haber¹
2 Fall Chickens
6 Schilling Money or Gold
30 Eggs

¹Winterthur measure: 1 Mütt (or mother) of smooth fruit to 4 quarters = 96.3 liters; 1 Malter Haber to 4 or 16 quarters = 444 liters.

So, Mütt is apparently a Winterthur measure of volume, and Malter is as well. And I'm assuming Kernen here means (corn) kernals? Any idea what Haber means?

Quote:
Now, your text was authored by one Hans Kläui. He died in 1992 but there's a club called "Friends of the Paul Kläui Library", Paul was his brother. The club aims to keep local history history in people's memory, they may be able to help you.
I've written them; haven't gotten an answer yet.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 03.02.2018, 10:46
me.anon's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: thun
Posts: 1,635
Groaned at 28 Times in 17 Posts
Thanked 2,033 Times in 983 Posts
me.anon has a reputation beyond reputeme.anon has a reputation beyond reputeme.anon has a reputation beyond reputeme.anon has a reputation beyond reputeme.anon has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

[quote]
Any idea what Haber means?
[quote]

I guess it is Hafer in more modern German, that is oats.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank me.anon for this useful post:
  #46  
Old 03.02.2018, 18:14
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Yeah, I eventually found that. Haber is Oats in Old German. Kernen can be kernals, seed and grain (and more), so grain is as good as anything.

So, only 2 hours of research to translate a sentence or two.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 03.02.2018, 21:14
curley's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: canton ZH
Posts: 5,553
Groaned at 62 Times in 57 Posts
Thanked 5,750 Times in 3,098 Posts
curley has a reputation beyond reputecurley has a reputation beyond reputecurley has a reputation beyond reputecurley has a reputation beyond reputecurley has a reputation beyond reputecurley has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Yeah, I eventually found that. Haber is Oats in Old German. Kernen can be kernals, seed and grain (and more), so grain is as good as anything.

So, only 2 hours of research to translate a sentence or two.
Haber is still Swissgerman for oat

And if someone says: "Chum mer gönd go habere" the person suggests to go eat.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank curley for this useful post:
  #48  
Old 13.02.2018, 07:08
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

No luck in getting a response from those references. But it did prompt me to get back to it, and translate the chapter, which I've done. I'm happy with most of it, some is a little rough, but there are a couple of sentences that make absolutely no sense to me. Any help would be appreciated:

Including a bit of translated to English for reference:
He offered his inheritance, which he owned from the Hinwil office, to them for 4600 guilders and 20 thalers, whereupon the Small Council informed him «wan er lust habe ze handlen, mög er alharo kommen, do man mit imme gebürend tractieren werde» “If he wants to trade, he may come here, to be born maltreated “. And it was maltreated!

Any idea what “Tollenkessi” and “Käspli” are?

Daniel Rösli was even denounced to the feudal lords in June 1720 and he was reprimanded to the bailiff as a punishment because he had «frächer wys zwo Eichen, deren eine drey schu breit über dem Stockh, und auch ein forren abghauwen und theils dem Wagner zu Seen verkaufft und (die) forren alharo zu der Steinmülli (Steigmühle) geführt».
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 13.02.2018, 10:03
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ostschweiz
Posts: 5,153
Groaned at 160 Times in 135 Posts
Thanked 6,569 Times in 3,373 Posts
Urs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Tollenkessi: "Kessi" means "Kessel", a kettle or cauldron, size can be anything bigger than, say, one litre. Not sure what the "Tollen" part means.

«frächer wys zwo Eichen, deren eine drey schu breit über dem Stockh, und auch ein forren abghauwen und theils dem Wagner zu Seen verkaufft und (die) forren alharo zu der Steinmülli (Steigmühle) geführt»

He brazenly sold two oak trees, one of which was already on the chopping block, to the wagoner in Seen (a location, there's a locatioin called "Winterthur Seen" today). In addition he cut down a Scots pine and brought it to the Steigmühle (a certain mill, there's still a location by that name, "Winterthur Steigmühle").
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Urs Max for this useful post:
  #50  
Old 13.02.2018, 10:34
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Japan
Posts: 154
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 232 Times in 89 Posts
Plau Deri is considered knowledgeablePlau Deri is considered knowledgeablePlau Deri is considered knowledgeable
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
“Tollenkessi”

Here (pdf) is a hint about it
Quote:
Regelmässig begegnet uns in Hausinventaren
auch das «Seechtkessi», oft «Tollenkessi» genannt,
weil es in der gemauerten «Bränntolle» in der Kü
che eingelassen war. Hier sott die Hausfrau drei
mal pro Jahr die grosse Wäsche und brannte der
Bauer den Schnaps
"In house inventories, you regularly come across the "Seechtkessi", also known as "Tollenkessi". It (the cauldron/bucket) was inserted in the brick-built burn-hole/firehole in the kitchen called "Bränntolle". Three times a year, the housewife would boil the large laudry and the farmer would make his moonshine there."

We still use "Tolle" in Swiss German for the drains/sewer holes in the streets.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Plau Deri for this useful post:
  #51  
Old 13.02.2018, 12:10
aSwissInTheUS's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Zurich area
Posts: 7,772
Groaned at 64 Times in 58 Posts
Thanked 11,204 Times in 5,090 Posts
aSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
«frächer wys zwo Eichen, deren eine drey schu breit über dem Stockh, und auch ein forren abghauwen und theils dem Wagner zu Seen verkaufft und (die) forren alharo zu der Steinmülli (Steigmühle) geführt»

He brazenly sold two oak trees, one of which was already on the chopping block, to the wagoner in Seen (a location, there's a locatioin called "Winterthur Seen" today). In addition he cut down a Scots pine and brought it to the Steigmühle (a certain mill, there's still a location by that name, "Winterthur Steigmühle").
He chopped those oaks trees, one was was even three shoes wide measured over the roots (Wurzelstock.) A shoe is the same as a foot, and its length varies all over Europe, maybe even Switzerland https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(unit)
But 30 cm is a good estimate. So this rascal chopped down a roughly 200 year old oak tree
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank aSwissInTheUS for this useful post:
  #52  
Old 13.02.2018, 14:08
aSwissInTheUS's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Zurich area
Posts: 7,772
Groaned at 64 Times in 58 Posts
Thanked 11,204 Times in 5,090 Posts
aSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Well, that's a few less Ctrl-### combinations I don't need to remember. ;-) Didn't know that either; thanks.
Change the keyboard setting to English US International
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...out-in-windows

Quote:
View Post
Yep, the ß (Eszett or "scharfes S") has been eliminated from German (even so-called high-German) in Switzerland -- thank goodness! The same symbol is used for upper case and lower case, so there would be no need to write the double S in standard German in the example you gave.

[...]

Huh? Where did you get that weird idea? I said that there was no need to use double S when writing in capitals in standard German; one would use the ß.
Actually since June 29 2017 one can official use the ẞ which is the capital version of the ß. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_%E1%BA%9E

Quote:
View Post
Really? I know it's being replaced in Germany, but didn't know it really wasn't used in Switzerland. I mail software programs around the world, including may to Germany and Switzerland, and capitalize the addresses (as seems to be the norm here), and always wondered if Berlinstraße becomes BERLINSTRASSE or what? I person I worked with insisted that with that Germans & Swiss wouldn't capitalize addresses. ;-)
Correct
https://www.post.ch/en/business/a-z-...ents-correctly
https://www.deutschepost.de/de/b/bri...schriften.html
http://www.upu.int/en/activities/add...countries.html

Quote:
View Post
W

Including a bit of translated to English for reference:
He offered his inheritance, which he owned from the Hinwil office, to them for 4600 guilders and 20 thalers, whereupon the Small Council informed him «wan er lust habe ze handlen, mög er alharo kommen, do man mit imme gebürend tractieren werde» “If he wants to trade, he may come here, to be born maltreated “. And it was maltreated!
Can you say which page it is on to get the full context? Like Page 75 for the above.

"when he feels like to negotiate, he may come down and he will be treated right and just". And they negotiated.

Tractieren/Traktieren (the same word, one is just the modern spelling) has different meanings. Maltreated is just one of them and actually a modern one. Originally it was just 'to treat someone', without a positive or negative connotation. Actually, treat and tractieren seem to be very closely related.
Just that tractieren also can mean to negotiate.

Erblehen is not inheritance, it is special kind of lease:
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erbpacht
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emphyteusis

A good resource to find the definition of older words is the Deutsche Wörterbuch, a 108 year project started by the Brother Grimm.
http://woerterbuchnetz.de/cgi-bin/WB...i_py?sigle=DWB

Here an old Book where Käspli:
https://books.google.ch/books?id=QVJ...A4spli&f=false
This occurrence and other uses in old books suggest that it means Kasten which is either a Wardrobe, Cabinet, or Trunk.
__________________
PLAYER 1 ENTER YOUR NAME:_

Last edited by aSwissInTheUS; 13.02.2018 at 14:20.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank aSwissInTheUS for this useful post:
  #53  
Old 13.02.2018, 17:32
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Tollenkessi: "Kessi" means "Kessel", a kettle or cauldron, size can be anything bigger than, say, one litre. Not sure what the "Tollen" part means.
I found the kettle part; best I'd come up with was "crazy kettle". :-)
Quote:
«frächer wys zwo Eichen, deren eine drey schu breit über dem Stockh, und auch ein forren abghauwen und theils dem Wagner zu Seen verkaufft und (die) forren alharo zu der Steinmülli (Steigmühle) geführt»

He brazenly sold two oak trees, one of which was already on the chopping block, to the wagoner in Seen (a location, there's a locatioin called "Winterthur Seen" today). In addition he cut down a Scots pine and brought it to the Steigmühle (a certain mill, there's still a location by that name, "Winterthur Steigmühle").
Thanks so much! I know Seen; I've been there.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 13.02.2018, 17:54
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Here (pdf) is a hint about it


"In house inventories, you regularly come across the "Seechtkessi", also known as "Tollenkessi". It (the cauldron/bucket) was inserted in the brick-built burn-hole/firehole in the kitchen called "Bränntolle". Three times a year, the housewife would boil the large laudry and the farmer would make his moonshine there."

We still use "Tolle" in Swiss German for the drains/sewer holes in the streets.
Thanks. Maybe here just Large Kettle.

Say, the PDF you referenced is very interesting, and I have a question on it, if I could:

On page 134 we have:

Wie Heinrich Heusser zu Tafleten vor 320 Jahren
sein Gut bewirtschaftete
Der Hof Tafleten umfasste im Jahre 1660
69 Jucharten Acker = 2484 a
24 Tagwen Wiese und Ried = 768 a
6 Jucharten Weide = 216 a
12 Vi Jucharten Wald = 500 a
Total 3968 a

Now, my research has agreed that Jucharten referred to the amount of land a brace of oxen could plow in a day, and is around 32-36 acres (above uses 36), although one source said 40,000-60,000 square feet. My book gives "123 Jucharten Acker unter dem Pflug, etwa 30 Mannwerk Wiesen". My problem is that the entire mountain area on which my ancestors lived was supposed to be 7.5 square km, which is 1,853 acres, and the above text would indicate 4,428 acres of plowed fields. I understand there's been apparently a lot of confusion about Jucharten, so wonder if this text didn't mean just 123 acres?

I've translated Acker as fields, Wiese as meadows, would those be correct? And would "Mannwerk" be handworked?

I see above, Tagwen seems to indicate a daily production rate as well, in this case 32 acres? Would Mannwerk be the same?
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 13.02.2018, 17:56
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
He chopped those oaks trees, one was was even three shoes wide measured over the roots (Wurzelstock.) A shoe is the same as a foot, and its length varies all over Europe, maybe even Switzerland https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(unit)
But 30 cm is a good estimate. So this rascal chopped down a roughly 200 year old oak tree
Fantastic, thanks! Not that he was a rascal, which I kind of knew, but that you've provided this great translation.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 13.02.2018, 18:06
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Can you say which page it is on to get the full context? Like Page 75 for the above.
Actually, it's on page 75 as well, about 1/4 the way down.
Quote:
A good resource to find the definition of older words is the Deutsche Wörterbuch, a 108 year project started by the Brother Grimm.
http://woerterbuchnetz.de/cgi-bin/WB...i_py?sigle=DWB
I actually found that previously. Good resource.
Quote:
Here an old Book where Käspli:
https://books.google.ch/books?id=QVJ...A4spli&f=false
This occurrence and other uses in old books suggest that it means Kasten which is either a Wardrobe, Cabinet, or Trunk.
Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 13.02.2018, 18:25
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

This is great; I really appreciate it, guys. Maybe I'll try a couple other clarifications:

Schuppossen: I've read that to be small farm areas with sheds but no houses. I used the word farmlet. You have anything better?

Fasnachthühn: Carnival chicken. Although probably not the ones I find in Google images when searching for it. Was carnival a specific time of the year? Also, at one point, my ancestor paid a tax of 9 1/2 Fasnachthühnen. One-Half? Really? Would this be on a plate? ;-)

Saum Wein: Apparently they paid taxes in money, chickens, grain AND wine ("5o Mütt Kernen und 25 Saum Wein". Any idea what Saum means here? I read something about amount carried by a donkey, but...

Darn, this is going to be a pretty good read after all!
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 13.02.2018, 19:02
22 yards's Avatar
Only in moderation
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Basel-Land
Posts: 7,310
Groaned at 210 Times in 168 Posts
Thanked 12,975 Times in 5,331 Posts
22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
This is great; I really appreciate it, guys. Maybe I'll try a couple other clarifications:

Schuppossen: I've read that to be small farm areas with sheds but no houses. I used the word farmlet. You have anything better?

Fasnachthühn: Carnival chicken. Although probably not the ones I find in Google images when searching for it. Was carnival a specific time of the year? Also, at one point, my ancestor paid a tax of 9 1/2 Fasnachthühnen. One-Half? Really? Would this be on a plate? ;-)

Saum Wein: Apparently they paid taxes in money, chickens, grain AND wine ("5o Mütt Kernen und 25 Saum Wein". Any idea what Saum means here? I read something about amount carried by a donkey, but...

Darn, this is going to be a pretty good read after all!
Just a guess, but "Saum Wein" could be "Schaumwein" -- sparkling wine. But then again, maybe not, as no units (bottles, cases, whatever) are mentioned, so I guess "Saum" is the unit.

Fasnacht (Carnival) is right about now in Basel and around this date across the region (including German parts of Switzerland, Alsace and Germany). The Winterthur Fasnacht is February 16-19 this year. The period varies each year; it's a religious observance, based on Easter, which of course is itself a movable feast. (The Basel Fasnacht, the largest and of course the best in Switzerland, starts at 4:00 am on the Monday following Ash Wednesday.)

ETA: Oh, here you go. Apparently "Saum" is a measure of wine for transportation. I'll let you translate the linked passage (use deepl.com for best results if your German needs supplementation), as the definition of a Saum varies widely depending which corner of Deutschschweiz you're looking in!

Last edited by 22 yards; 13.02.2018 at 19:14.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank 22 yards for this useful post:
  #59  
Old 13.02.2018, 19:13
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chapin
Posts: 29
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 2 Posts
rraisley has no particular reputation at present
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Just a guess, but "Saum Wein" could be "Schaumwein" -- sparkling wine.
Wonder where a farmer would come up with champagne? Everything else, they had.
Quote:
Fasnacht (Carnival) is right about now in Basel and around this date across the region (including German parts of Switzerland, Alsace and Germany).
So, a Winter Chicken? Too early for Spring Chicken. And half a chicken?

Oh, and on the map on page 65:

Birch: birch trees?
Gatter: fenced area?
Riet: reeds or brush?
Im Hau: a building area?
Im Moos: mossy area?
Loo: ???
Breite: wide or width, but a description of land?
Roosen: roses??
Musental: possibly a place?
Aufhänke: possibly a place?
Häsental: possibly a place?
Steintobel: possibly a place?
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 13.02.2018, 19:17
22 yards's Avatar
Only in moderation
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Basel-Land
Posts: 7,310
Groaned at 210 Times in 168 Posts
Thanked 12,975 Times in 5,331 Posts
22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute22 yards has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Suggestions for Translation of Swiss-German to English

Quote:
View Post
Wonder where a farmer would come up with champagne? Everything else, they had.
Have a look at the late edit I made to my previous post.

For all the other questions, I suggest you try running your phrases through the excellent Historisches Lexikon der Schweiz, then running the answer through deepl.

Viel Glück!

Another late edit: words ending in "tal" are usually place names. "Tal" means valley. Not a lot of "tal"s around Basel. Lots of "wil"s, though.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank 22 yards for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Translation from German to English of Swiss Divorce Decree pjohnmathew Permits/visas/government 3 30.03.2017 09:34
Translation help please, english to swiss german for a birthday Sweetness Language corner 4 16.06.2012 01:49
English to Swiss-German Translation? dodgeydude24 Language corner 17 26.09.2011 08:25
Swiss-German to English Translation hanra Language corner 12 10.05.2010 02:05
English translation of Schaher seppli: Swiss german song darron Language corner 2 26.07.2008 22:50


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:27.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0