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Old 10.07.2008, 23:08
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(German) difference between obst & fruchte?

we discussed this in my german class but even my teacher wasn't sure on the difference!
also, does anyone really say apfelsine for orange??
thanks for any help
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Old 10.07.2008, 23:14
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

Not heard that one before. However, it is Appelsin in Swedish, Appelsyn in Afrikaans (although they say lemoen), Sinaasappel in Dutch, and... Appelsyn in Frisian.

So, I think it's correct but old.
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Old 10.07.2008, 23:22
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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also, does anyone really say apfelsine for orange??
thanks for any help
Apfelsine is the correct word for orange in Germany. The Swiss often use French words (e.g. merci for thanks). The Swiss always say orange. Many elderly Germans use the word Apfelsine!

Another example: Grapefruit is grapefruit in Switzerland but Pampelmousse in Germany.
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Old 10.07.2008, 23:32
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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we discussed this in my german class but even my teacher wasn't sure on the difference!
Wikipedia has comprehensive explanations:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obst
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frucht
which are, off course, in German (no groans please!)

The words are synonymous in everyday usage. The difference is only pedantic. Frucht is anything which started as a flower, was pollinated and became a fruit. Obst is what you have on the dining table.
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Old 10.07.2008, 23:35
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

...............................

Last edited by ElieDeLeuze; 09.07.2009 at 18:48.
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Old 11.07.2008, 09:01
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

And if that isn't confusing enough, you also have "Obstgemüse", used to describe things like pumpkins and zucchini.
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Old 11.07.2008, 09:10
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

I had it explained to me this way....

Obst is more your "everyday" fruit...apples, bannanas, oranges, etc..

Fruchte includes the more exotic sorts...mangos, pineapples, papaya, etc

but i guess they really are talking about the same thing, just the category in which it fits...
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Old 11.07.2008, 10:00
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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And if that isn't confusing enough, you also have "Obstgemüse", used to describe things like pumpkins and zucchini.
Obstgemüse is botanically a "fruit" but you eat it like a "vegetable".

My suggestion: futile to analyze any language. Go with the flow and absorb it idiomatic, like a child.
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Old 11.07.2008, 10:31
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

well it ties in with this topic
I have written many moons ago several 'lexcions' for my now 'late' yahoo swiss cookery group this is the one about fruits and nuts and how they are called from english over french to high and swiss german

http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?k...ViV6gImHKNu4OQ
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Old 11.07.2008, 10:32
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

Apfelsine may be proper High German, but in the 30 years that I lived in Germany I have never heard an Orange called an Apfelsine. YMMV.

Obst is the generic term, like "fruit", vs. "Gemüse" which is "veggies."

Früchte IMHO is more specific, like "fruits", sounds more High German, less colloquial to me.

Sample conversation:

Person 1: "Ich gehe zum Coop, Obst kaufen."
(I am fixin to go to Coop to purchase some fruit.)

Person 2: "Was für Früchte kaufst Du?"
(What kind of fruit are you gonna buy?)
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Old 11.07.2008, 11:16
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

thanks for all the replies...(and to eastenders for that list, superuseful i should think)
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Old 11.07.2008, 11:16
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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Apfelsine is the correct word for orange in Germany. The Swiss often use French words (e.g. merci for thanks). The Swiss always say orange. Many elderly Germans use the word Apfelsine!

Another example: Grapefruit is grapefruit in Switzerland but Pampelmousse in Germany.
Apfelsine is common in the northern half of Germany, according to Wikipedia. They know Orange there too, however. But the Austrians surprise me most with their own food vocabulary. The only other German-Swiss difference I can think of is Peperoni-Paprika.

Grapefruit and Pampelmousse are similar, but not identical fruits.


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And if that isn't confusing enough, you also have "Obstgemüse", used to describe things like pumpkins and zucchini.
Obstgemüse is a very rare expression, the counterpart to Früchte and Obst is Gemüse (vegetables). I think the rule of thumb is that fruits are sweet and vegetables often eaten with salt, with no biological definition behind it.
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Old 11.07.2008, 13:11
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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thanks for all the replies...(and to eastenders for that list, superuseful i should think)

You're welcome, I have compiled a few others about veggies,dairy,herbs and stuff etc

But i just realised, i should have edited it before putting it up....it's brimming with typos, will see to get them corrected asap
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Old 11.07.2008, 13:35
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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we discussed this in my german class but even my teacher wasn't sure on the difference!
also, does anyone really say apfelsine for orange??
thanks for any help
Apfelsine is used more in the north of the country. It is still used
by young and old. In the south and west of Germany "orange" is
used much more.
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Old 11.07.2008, 13:51
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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Apfelsine may be proper High German, but in the 30 years that I lived in Germany I have never heard an Orange called an Apfelsine. YMMV.

Obst is the generic term, like "fruit", vs. "Gemüse" which is "veggies."

Früchte IMHO is more specific, like "fruits", sounds more High German, less colloquial to me.

Sample conversation:

Person 1: "Ich gehe zum Coop, Obst kaufen."
(I am fixin to go to Coop to purchase some fruit.)

Person 2: "Was für Früchte kaufst Du?"
(What kind of fruit are you gonna buy?)
Where do you come from in Germany?
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Old 11.07.2008, 14:05
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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Apfelsine is used more in the north of the country. It is still used
by young and old. In the south and west of Germany "orange" is
used much more.
This is quite an interesting article, although at times, "tongue-in-cheek".

http://www.taboo-breaker.org/language/reinheit.htm
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Old 11.07.2008, 14:15
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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Apfelsine is the correct word for orange in Germany. The Swiss often use French words (e.g. merci for thanks). The Swiss always say orange. Many elderly Germans use the word Apfelsine!

.
In Bayern, where I lived for the past seven years, I never saw Orange referred to as Apfelsine, however relatively often across Germany I have seen Orange Juice referred to as Apfelsinensaft, but have only ever seen Schorle referrred to as O-saftschorle, or Orangensaftschorle, never Apfelsinensaftschorle. Probably because you would have died of thirst before you could order your such a polysyllabic drink.

Regarding the use of 'Merci" I would guess in Switzerland it is due to the prevelance of a French minority, but 'Merci' is also well established in Bayerisch, which is a result of direct French (Napoleonic) influence.
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Old 11.07.2008, 14:18
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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Regarding the use of 'Merci" I would guess in Switzerland it is due to the prevelance of a French minority, but 'Merci' is also well established in Bayerisch, which is a result of direct French (Napoleonic) influence.
"Merci" is being introduced into other parts of Germany. By me. By mistake. Everytime I go up there and forget I am no longer in Switzerland.

I also ordered eine Stange in a bar (small beer in Switzerland but a stick in the rest of the German speaking world).

Odd looks all round...
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Old 11.07.2008, 14:27
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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I also ordered eine Stange in a bar (small beer in Switzerland but a stick in the rest of the German speaking world).

Odd looks all round...
Understandably. Towards Koeln try ordering a Schnitt, and if you want to order a small Bier in Bayern and you are expecting that to be anything less than a Halbe (0.5L) then think again. Everyone in Bayern knows the universal non-divisible unit of Bier is a Halbe. Anything smaller than that is just some atom splitting trickery or counts as Bier aroma.
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Old 11.07.2008, 14:35
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Re: (German) difference between obst & fruchte?

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Where do you come from in Germany?
Born in Stuttgart, grew up in Boeblingen and Ueberlingen.

Made sure I got to Texas as fast as I could.
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