Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Language corner  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 22.08.2019, 09:13
swissotter's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: ZH
Posts: 2,307
Groaned at 10 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 3,439 Times in 1,412 Posts
swissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond repute
Glücklich

So was discussing the word 'lucky' in German with some Swiss. And they said there was no word for a 'lucky person' in German, and that "glücklich" meant happy. I knew that but i thought it also meant lucky.

then i had to check for myself :

"The word “glücklich” expresses a deeper, more permanent happiness or life-satisfaction:“Er ist eine glückliche Person.” – “He is a happy person
Contrary to what it may sound like, the word “glücklich” DOES NOT mean “lucky”. In fact (perhaps tellingly), the German language has no word for “lucky”. Germans have to use the construction “to have luck” in order to express good fortune befalling them: “Er hatte Glück als er den Jackpot gewonnen hat.” – “He was lucky when he won the jackpot.”


so is that really so? seems odd...
__________________

be the glitch you want to see in the matrix
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 22.08.2019, 09:23
aSwissInTheUS's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Zurich area
Posts: 13,188
Groaned at 102 Times in 91 Posts
Thanked 20,286 Times in 8,981 Posts
aSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond reputeaSwissInTheUS has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Lucky person - Glückspilz
Reply With Quote
The following 12 users would like to thank aSwissInTheUS for this useful post:
  #3  
Old 22.08.2019, 09:27
roegner's Avatar
Moderately Dutch
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Zurich
Posts: 12,049
Groaned at 394 Times in 331 Posts
Thanked 15,870 Times in 7,297 Posts
roegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

You're happy-go-lucky. Du bist leichtlebig.


Although I wouldn´t use that expression.


She's very happy-go-lucky. Sie ist sehr unbekümmert.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank roegner for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 22.08.2019, 09:33
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Glücklich

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, but all the indicators were clear once the tumor was gone, my doctor said i had „Glück im Unglück“, true —- but I though that always meant luck in misfortune. And yes, I agreed with her.
Reply With Quote
The following 10 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #5  
Old 22.08.2019, 09:59
swissotter's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: ZH
Posts: 2,307
Groaned at 10 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 3,439 Times in 1,412 Posts
swissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
Lucky person - Glückspilz

this came up in the discussion too.


Quote:
View Post
You're happy-go-lucky. Du bist leichtlebig. Although I wouldn´t use that expression. She's very happy-go-lucky. Sie ist sehr unbekümmert.

interesting to learn this saying in DE but happy-go-lucky is not quite the same as being a lucky person...
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank swissotter for this useful post:
  #6  
Old 22.08.2019, 10:37
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 14,033
Groaned at 1,374 Times in 914 Posts
Thanked 21,114 Times in 8,069 Posts
Chuff has a reputation beyond reputeChuff has a reputation beyond reputeChuff has a reputation beyond reputeChuff has a reputation beyond reputeChuff has a reputation beyond reputeChuff has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
So was discussing the word 'lucky' in German with some Swiss. And they said there was no word for a 'lucky person' in German, and that "glücklich" meant happy. I knew that but i thought it also meant lucky.

then i had to check for myself :

"The word “glücklich” expresses a deeper, more permanent happiness or life-satisfaction:“Er ist eine glückliche Person.” – “He is a happy person
Contrary to what it may sound like, the word “glücklich” DOES NOT mean “lucky”. In fact (perhaps tellingly), the German language has no word for “lucky”. Germans have to use the construction “to have luck” in order to express good fortune befalling them: “Er hatte Glück als er den Jackpot gewonnen hat.” – “He was lucky when he won the jackpot.”


so is that really so? seems odd...
I thought Glücklich meant lucky for years until someone finally corrected me. Sigh... German is so annoying and illogical (to me) to learn.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 22.08.2019, 10:51
swissotter's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: ZH
Posts: 2,307
Groaned at 10 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 3,439 Times in 1,412 Posts
swissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond reputeswissotter has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
I thought Glücklich meant lucky for years until someone finally corrected me. Sigh... German is so annoying and illogical (to me) to learn.
'tis annoying indeed! remember that gem of "ich bin heiss/ warm vs mir ist heiss/warm. that still seems weird to me (i still say ich bin warm)
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank swissotter for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 22.08.2019, 11:02
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 233
Groaned at 6 Times in 4 Posts
Thanked 284 Times in 121 Posts
Calvin has an excellent reputationCalvin has an excellent reputationCalvin has an excellent reputationCalvin has an excellent reputation
Re: Glücklich

"glücklich" means both "happy" and "lucky" depending on how you use the word. "ein glücklicher Mensch" is a "happy person" but "ein glücklicher Sieg" is a "lucky victory" and "eine glückliche Fügung" is a lucky coincidence.
Reply With Quote
The following 8 users would like to thank Calvin for this useful post:
  #9  
Old 22.08.2019, 11:30
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 8,849
Groaned at 110 Times in 90 Posts
Thanked 13,689 Times in 5,566 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
I thought Glücklich meant lucky for years until someone finally corrected me. Sigh... German is so annoying and illogical (to me) to learn.
Yes, I did the same with "ignorant". In English, I had always taken it to mean lacking knowledge, and that was factual, but emotionally neutral.

Have you ever refurbished a car's engine?
Oh, no, I'm entirely ignorant of such things.

Can your maths teach explain relativity?
No, she's an excellent teacher, but ignorant of the more complex fields of physics.

In German, however, it carries a negative connotation, more like "ignore" in English. A person who is "ignorant" (German) does not want to know, even when they ought to, and this shows in their rude attitude. This is the case when a person at the enquiries desk can't answer the question, and won't look it up, and can't be bothered to ask colleagues and doesn't intend to serve the public.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 22.08.2019, 12:04
Blueangel's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Küsnacht, Switzerland
Posts: 4,276
Groaned at 131 Times in 115 Posts
Thanked 11,524 Times in 5,022 Posts
Blueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
A person who is "ignorant" (German) does not want to know, even when they ought to, and this shows in their rude attitude.
It's has the same meaning in English too. The phrase 'Sie ist eine ignorante Kuh.' translates literally and with the same meaning in both languages and one of my Swiss friends and two German friends use it frequently when refering to a particular mutual acquaintance of ours.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Blueangel for this useful post:
  #11  
Old 22.08.2019, 13:41
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 8,849
Groaned at 110 Times in 90 Posts
Thanked 13,689 Times in 5,566 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
It's has the same meaning in English too.
Yes, it can have, but in English, I think, you have to indicate it with something else, in the example you gave, the insult "Kuh" (cow).

If, however, you are speaking to a very helpful government clerk who explains you all you need to know about, say, registering your car and getting the proper licences and insurances, and then you also ask her whether she happens to know what paperwork you need for your dog, but she simply doesn't know, and is sorry she can't help you about the procedures for pets, then she is - in English - ignorant about pets, but she is not "ignorant", as used in German.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 22.08.2019, 13:48
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 8,849
Groaned at 110 Times in 90 Posts
Thanked 13,689 Times in 5,566 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
I thought Glücklich meant lucky for years until someone finally corrected me. Sigh... German is so annoying and illogical (to me) to learn.
In my German class, we had someone who, for quite a long time, thought "glücklich" meant punctual.

He had come from South America and had been lectured by his employer about ditching his concept of mañana, mañana, and had been trying hard to acculturalise, to do things the Swiss way and get to places on time. His team-leader praised him saying: "Gut, gut, jetzt glücklich."

He finally figured out that he must have left Spanish behind to go through his next language, English, to arrive at glücklich = clock-ly = punctual.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank doropfiz for this useful post:
  #13  
Old 22.08.2019, 13:52
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
Yes, it can have, but in English, I think, you have to indicate it with something else, in the example you gave, the insult "Kuh" (cow).

If, however, you are speaking to a very helpful government clerk who explains you all you need to know about, say, registering your car and getting the proper licences and insurances, and then you also ask her whether she happens to know what paperwork you need for your dog, but she simply doesn't know, and is sorry she can't help you about the procedures for pets, then she is - in English - ignorant about pets, but she is not "ignorant", as used in German.
I think in this instance you would need the word "ignoramus", which is a person who is just generally ignorant.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #14  
Old 22.08.2019, 15:07
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 12,361
Groaned at 338 Times in 274 Posts
Thanked 26,263 Times in 11,000 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Two words that many German speakers get wrong in English are sensible and hardly.

She is a sensible girl (when actually they mean sensitive)

and my absolute favourite

We are hardly working (meaning, we are working very hard).

I once had a boss who wrote that in my appraisal and was perplexed when I objected, even though actually he was probably right.
Reply With Quote
The following 7 users would like to thank amogles for this useful post:
  #15  
Old 22.08.2019, 16:55
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
Yes, it can have, but in English, I think, you have to indicate it with something else, in the example you gave, the insult "Kuh" (cow).

If, however, you are speaking to a very helpful government clerk who explains you all you need to know about, say, registering your car and getting the proper licences and insurances, and then you also ask her whether she happens to know what paperwork you need for your dog, but she simply doesn't know, and is sorry she can't help you about the procedures for pets, then she is - in English - ignorant about pets, but she is not "ignorant", as used in German.
Where I grew up (Western Pennsylvania) - ignorant almost always was an insult. You‘re ignorant, that‘s ignorant etc was used to criticize thoughtless behavior.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #16  
Old 22.08.2019, 17:08
Belgianmum's Avatar
Roastbeef & Yorkshire mod
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Neuchâtel
Posts: 14,234
Groaned at 281 Times in 238 Posts
Thanked 24,477 Times in 9,960 Posts
Belgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
Where I grew up (Western Pennsylvania) - ignorant almost always was an insult. You‘re ignorant, that‘s ignorant etc was used to criticize thoughtless behavior.
It was in Yorkshire where I grew up too, it would never have been used in the way doropfiz outlined it above.
Reply With Quote
The following 6 users would like to thank Belgianmum for this useful post:
  #17  
Old 22.08.2019, 17:33
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
Two words that many German speakers get wrong in English are sensible and hardly.

She is a sensible girl (when actually they mean sensitive)

and my absolute favourite

We are hardly working (meaning, we are working very hard).

I once had a boss who wrote that in my appraisal and was perplexed when I objected, even though actually he was probably right.
Wasn‘t sensibility formerly used in English in much the same way? For example, Jane Austen‘s “Sense and Sensibility” - Sensibility is the ability to be sensitive/feel/perceive other’s feelings.



When did sensible change to functional and practical?
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #18  
Old 22.08.2019, 17:34
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
It was in Yorkshire where I grew up too, it would never have been used in the way doropfiz outlined it above.
I knew I liked Yorkshire folk!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank for this useful post:
  #19  
Old 22.08.2019, 21:26
Tilia's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: ZH
Posts: 2,745
Groaned at 75 Times in 42 Posts
Thanked 2,649 Times in 1,194 Posts
Tilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Actually is actually another word the German speakers use incorrectly.

Quote:
View Post
Two words that many German speakers get wrong in English are sensible and hardly.

She is a sensible girl (when actually they mean sensitive)

and my absolute favourite

We are hardly working (meaning, we are working very hard).

I once had a boss who wrote that in my appraisal and was perplexed when I objected, even though actually he was probably right.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Tilia for this useful post:
  #20  
Old 22.08.2019, 21:30
Belgianmum's Avatar
Roastbeef & Yorkshire mod
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Neuchâtel
Posts: 14,234
Groaned at 281 Times in 238 Posts
Thanked 24,477 Times in 9,960 Posts
Belgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Glücklich

Quote:
View Post
Actually is actually another word the German speakers use incorrectly.
French speakers do too.
Eventually is another one.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Belgianmum for this useful post:
Reply

Tags
glücklich ; lucky




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 16:03.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0