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Old 24.08.2019, 15:59
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What does it mean: Swiss German?

Hi,

I recently came across a swiss dialogue. Someone mentioned something like: "Du gaast net nt mehr abe", or something..
also: "Du kommscht net nt mehr inne, or something.

Do Swiss always include the net before the "nt". In German they would say: Du kommst nicht mehr rein...Does it translate in Swiss
German into: "Du kommscht net nt mehr inne"?

What does it mean?

Thanks
Sahasrara

Last edited by Sahasrara; 24.08.2019 at 16:17.
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Old 24.08.2019, 16:11
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

My guess would be You dont come anymore ...
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Old 24.08.2019, 20:01
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

Was the elevator full?
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Old 25.08.2019, 02:13
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

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Do Swiss always include the net before the "nt". In German they would say: Du kommst nicht mehr rein...Does it translate in Swiss German into: "Du kommscht net nt mehr inne"?

What does it mean?
No, there's no such thing in Swiss German.

I'm a native speaker and know all the dialects pretty well and speak quite a few of them well enough to fool locals, but your sentence simply doesn't make sense.

Maybe you misheard something. I remember when my now wife, from the US Midwest, overheard conversations between me and my ex and then asked me why we had been talking about Wisconsin and the Baltic Sea so much. Honestly, I still don't know what we said that she mistook for those place names.
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Old 25.08.2019, 06:09
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

I can suggest something that sounds a little similar.

You're not getting nothing! (e.g. to appease someone who fears they might not get a slice of cake when everyone else is getting a slice)
Du chunsch nd nt br!
You get not nothing.

It's not as if you can't come down! (e.g. to encourage someone stuck up a tree, or to give a cheeky response to someone who just didn't make it to get in a full lift/elevator going down).
Du chusch niid nd abbe.
You come not not down.

Do my examples work, please, Captain Greybeard, or something along those lines?
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Old 25.08.2019, 07:53
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

well nt =nichts=nothing

and nd= nicht=not
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Old 25.08.2019, 09:50
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

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I can suggest something that sounds a little similar.

You're not getting nothing! (e.g. to appease someone who fears they might not get a slice of cake when everyone else is getting a slice)
Du chunsch nd nt br!
You get not nothing.

It's not as if you can't come down! (e.g. to encourage someone stuck up a tree, or to give a cheeky response to someone who just didn't make it to get in a full lift/elevator going down).
Du chusch niid nd abbe.
You come not not down.

Do my examples work, please, Captain Greybeard, or something along those lines?
Thanks, this is it! Could you also write in German the meaning of "Du chusch nid nd abbe" please?

Does it also apply in case of someone does not get terminated anymore?

Thanks,
Sahasrara
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Old 25.08.2019, 10:16
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

Here are the High German versions:
Du chunsch nd nuut br!
Du bekommst nicht nichts!

Fixing the double negative:
Du chunsch scho ppis br!
Du bekommt schon etwas!
You will definitely get something.

Du chunsch niid nd abbe.
Du kommst nicht nicht runter.

Fixing the double negative:
Du chunsch scho abbe.
Du kommst schon runter.
You will definitely come/get down.



Having said that, I think we should wait for Captain Greybeard, or another mother-tongue Swiss-German speaker, to comment on whether my suggestions are accurate.
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Old 25.08.2019, 14:17
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

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No, there's no such thing in Swiss German.

I'm a native speaker and know all the dialects pretty well and speak quite a few of them well enough to fool locals, but your sentence simply doesn't make sense.

Maybe you misheard something. I remember when my now wife, from the US Midwest, overheard conversations between me and my ex and then asked me why we had been talking about Wisconsin and the Baltic Sea so much. Honestly, I still don't know what we said that she mistook for those place names.
Any suggestion though? A native speaker of any language is supposed to have some sort of intuition in regards with the way non-native speakers pronounce or hear certain words...

OP, maybe if you provide more context? To me it seems jacek is spot on, but I am not a native speaker of course.
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Old 25.08.2019, 15:37
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

https://youtu.be/n5YhjiupY08

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Old 25.08.2019, 16:12
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

doropfiz provided examples of double negatives that do make sense, unlike, e.g., colloquial "This ain't no problem." But I do not know any Swiss German dialect that uses two different words for "not", as in "ni(i)d nd" (doropfiz) and "net nt" (Sahasrara). Usually, it's either "nid" or "nd", depending on the dialect. Or maybe I'm missing something because of old age and distance.

greenmount is right, context might help a huge lot.
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Old 25.08.2019, 16:21
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

Captain Greybeard, could you please try, specifying the dialects, how you would reply to someone who was stuck up at tree, crying "I can't get down!" and you wanted to negate that, saying it is not so, since you have a ladder. Or to someone who just missed the lift. There are stairs.

I chumm nd abbe!
Du chunsch nd nd abbe. I hane Leitere. OR Es ht Stge.
(To my ear, niid nd abbe sounds right-er!)

On anyone else with a Swiss German dialect (which one?) as mother-tongue, please?
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Old 26.08.2019, 23:03
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

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Any suggestion though? A native speaker of any language is supposed to have some sort of intuition in regards with the way non-native speakers pronounce or hear certain words...

OP, maybe if you provide more context? To me it seems jacek is spot on, but I am not a native speaker of course.
Context: Does it also apply in case of someone does not get terminated jobwise or rental-wise (you don't come out / "niit nd abbe"?
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Old 26.08.2019, 23:10
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Re: What does it mean: Swiss German?

Okay, that's the social context. But in what sentences was it spoken? How was the phrase used? What was said immediately before or after it? Without that kind of information, it seems to me any explanations here will be mere speculation.

At least this can be said: it is not a regularly used expression that I know, in any context to do with an employment or a rental contract.
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