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  #21  
Old 28.03.2020, 09:47
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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I’m not sure what the exact term for these words are but I’m aware there are a few borrowed words by German speakers that mean something completely different in the native language.
Excellent point.

We've adapted the word into our own English vocabulary without realizing it's a German term and not an English one. Could someone tell us what people are calling this in England or the US?

Work at home?
Work remotely?

This is what the BBC advises on how to work from home (and not one work about home office) https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article...-in-a-pandemic
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Old 28.03.2020, 10:01
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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Excellent point.

We've adapted the word into our own English vocabulary without realizing it's a German term and not an English one. Could someone tell us what people are calling this in England or the US?

Work at home?
Work remotely?


This is what the BBC advises on how to work from home (and not one work about home office) https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article...-in-a-pandemic
The love doctor already answered this. Working from home is the usual term. That's always been the phrase I've heard.
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  #23  
Old 28.03.2020, 10:02
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

Isn't home office a corporate lingo, too..
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  #24  
Old 28.03.2020, 10:20
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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Isn't home office a corporate lingo, too..
The term home office typically refers to (in my mind) a room, often a bedroom that has been converted into a "proper" office that is used by someone who runs a business from their home on an ongoing basis. Some of these people, who tend to go a bit stir crazy if they do not have enough people contact, have migrated towards "co-working" arrangements where they rent a seat in an office to work from. This has been a growing sector in the last few years.

The current "temporary" situation has people working on the kitchen or dining room table or other spot where they can set up their office or personal laptop to connect to the Internet and answer emails, do video calls etc. in an effort to keep projects and the company moving.
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Last edited by Verbier; 28.03.2020 at 14:32. Reason: typo of course
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  #25  
Old 28.03.2020, 10:34
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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The term home office typically refers to (in my mind) a room, often a bedroom that has been converted into a "proper" office that is used by someone who runs a business from their home on an ongoing basis. Some of these people, who tend to go a bit stir crazy if they do not have enough people contact, have migrated towards "co-working" arrangements where they rent a seat in an office to work from. This has been a growing sector in the last few years.

The current "temporary" situation has people working on the kitchen or dinning room table or other spot where they can set up their office or personal laptop to connect to the Internet and answer emails, do video calls etc. in an effort to keep projects and the company moving.
And schools moving. Tell me about it.

Reminds me somebody who'd signal "need to go host my meeting" when going to do no. 2. I guess that's not a corporate lingo.

I am used to virtual co-working arrangements (provided by platforms) which is fun when people then actually meet and really work together. Friends for life.
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Old 28.03.2020, 10:41
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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Isn't home office a corporate lingo, too..
Nope. Working from home. Or WfH.

A home office /study implies more than just half of the dining table.


It's not "a" coprporate lingo, btw. Non-count noun.
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Old 28.03.2020, 10:50
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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This is what the BBC advises on how to work from home (and not one word about home office) https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article...-in-a-pandemic
It’s there!

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Google, Microsoft, Twitter. Hitachi, Apple, Amazon. Chevron, Salesforce, Spotify. From the UK to the US, Japan to South Korea, these are all global companies that have, in the last few days, rolled out mandatory work-from-home policies amid the spread of Covid-19.

And it’s realistic to assume that shifting to the ‘home office’ will become the new normal for many of us for a while, given Wednesday’s announcement by the World Health Organization that the coronavirus has officially reached ‘pandemic’ status.
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  #28  
Old 28.03.2020, 10:54
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

I'm English and I work from home. My wife is Swiss and does home office.

They are the same thing, irrespective of whether you are using half the dining room table or have a physical office at home.
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Old 28.03.2020, 10:54
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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It’s there!
It is all over. It is a corporate term, seems like. My VIP Corporare Buddies (yup, I am looking at you, over there ) have been throwing it around for a while.

I am using our coffee table. I don't have enough light elsewhere for live classes.

My kid is squatting half of our kitchen table, as her home office. Home school. Distance learning. Remote whatever.

Last edited by MusicChick; 28.03.2020 at 11:57.
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Old 29.03.2020, 00:27
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

Home office has been used in Australia for quite a while ... at least one decade, probably more.
It did refer to the actual work space set up at home, though ... and people would work in their home office.
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Old 29.03.2020, 11:31
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Re: Question for the English native speakers

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What I find the funniest is the term “home office” itself... which means something completely different in the UK. (i.e. the governmental office for “home” affairs as opposed to foreign ones)

At least I don’t recall anyone using this when I was still there many years ago. People usually just say I’m working from home with no exact term for it.
The term has been used for decades to refer to the physical home working environment, and indeed the software used to enable it, but not used anything like as much for the act of WfH, which is indeed the normal UK English way of describing it, even to the extreme normality of using the abbreviation as I just have.

But there has always been a different emphasis on the two usages, with the government dept always stressing the Home, the working environment stressing the first syllable of Office.
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