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-   -   Question for the English native speakers (https://www.englishforum.ch/language-corner/297422-question-english-native-speakers.html)

rainer_d 27.03.2020 11:34

Question for the English native speakers
 
Hi,


the lady responsible for preparing the Easter gifts at work (we receive a bunch of chcoloates for Easter, Christmas and a Grittibänz at St. Nikolaus as a gift every year) has asked me if the English equivalent to "Das Home Office versüssen" is "To sweeten the home office".


I tend to think that the "the" needs to be omitted, but I can't really explain it.

NotAllThere 27.03.2020 11:54

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Question for the English native speakers
At which point a small fight broke out...:D

I think "To sweeten the home office" is ok. "To sweeten home office" is better. But I'd go for "To sweeten your home office".

doropfiz 27.03.2020 11:55

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Yes, agree with NotAllThere. This: "To sweeten your home office".

Bossa Nova 27.03.2020 11:55

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
To me "To Sweeten the Home Office" is preferable, as it is a description of what the contents are intended to do. "Sweeten the Home Office" sounds like an order.


B.

ch2013 27.03.2020 11:56

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
I'd send them a case of wine instead ;)

robBob 27.03.2020 11:57

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Home sweet home office. ;)

Belgianmum 27.03.2020 12:00

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
I think ‘To sweeten your home office’ sounds better too.

doropfiz 27.03.2020 12:05

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by robBob (Post 3163995)
Home sweet home office. ;)

Wow, robBob's suggestion has zing!

Guest 27.03.2020 12:10

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by robBob (Post 3163995)
Home sweet home office. ;)

I think humour is hugely important now- so yes, I'd go for that - bravo.

rainer_d 27.03.2020 12:18

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
OK, thank you, all of you.


Turns out, this was what she originally suggested.
I thought it sounded too "German"....

Guest 27.03.2020 20:06

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rainer_d (Post 3163976)
Hi,


the lady responsible for preparing the Easter gifts at work (we receive a bunch of chcoloates for Easter, Christmas and a Grittibänz at St. Nikolaus as a gift every year) has asked me if the English equivalent to "Das Home Office versüssen" is "To sweeten the home office".


I tend to think that the "the" needs to be omitted, but I can't really explain it.

To make your home office less shite.

lost_inbroad 27.03.2020 20:11

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rainer_d (Post 3164004)
OK, thank you, all of you.


Turns out, this was what she originally suggested.
I thought it sounded too "German"....

With a name like Rainer, you won't have to worry about a futile "the", for making anything sound more German.

MusicChick 27.03.2020 20:33

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rainer_d (Post 3163976)
Hi,


the lady responsible for preparing the Easter gifts at work (we receive a bunch of chcoloates for Easter, Christmas and a Grittibänz at St. Nikolaus as a gift every year) has asked me if the English equivalent to "Das Home Office versüssen" is "To sweeten the home office".


I tend to think that the "the" needs to be omitted, but I can't really explain it.

Do they have one extra? :p:msnblush:

k_and_e 27.03.2020 20:41

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rainer_d (Post 3163976)
Hi,


the lady responsible for preparing the Easter gifts at work (we receive a bunch of chcoloates for Easter, Christmas and a Grittibänz at St. Nikolaus as a gift every year) has asked me if the English equivalent to "Das Home Office versüssen" is "To sweeten the home office".


I tend to think that the "the" needs to be omitted, but I can't really explain it.

Could it be that she was just flirting?

MusicChick 27.03.2020 20:42

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by k_and_e (Post 3164182)
Could it be that she was just flirting?

With all of'em?

Wow.

olygirl 27.03.2020 20:44

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
I'm still stuck on the fact that your office hands out Easter presents to their employees

TheSpouse 27.03.2020 21:10

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by olygirl (Post 3164185)
I'm still stuck on the fact that your office hands out Easter presents to their employees


Me, too! This is crazy. I would just put "Gifts from the Bunny" on the card or Happy Easter or something like that. Sweets for the Home Office or whatever just sounds ridiculous.


How about Bonbons from the Bunbun?

rainer_d 28.03.2020 02:53

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by olygirl (Post 3164185)
I'm still stuck on the fact that your office hands out Easter presents to their employees

It's just chocolates for 65 odd people.
They are run-of-the-mill chocolates from Migros. Not Sprüngli or so.
But it is a nice gesture, I agree. Usually, the receptionists and the marketing lady place them on each desk after work, a bit like Santa ;-)
But because everybody is home, they will be sent by post this year.

Though, we might receive the branded water-bottles, too (they are usually given as gifts to clients), but I got word that we will receive those, too for Easter.

rainer_d 28.03.2020 02:55

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by k_and_e (Post 3164182)
Could it be that she was just flirting?


Could be ;-)

It's all harmless banter, though.

The_Love_Doctor 28.03.2020 07:29

Re: Question for the English native speakers
 
What I find the funniest is the term “home office” itself... which means something completely different in the UK. (i.e. the governmental office for “home” affairs as opposed to foreign ones)

At least I don’t recall anyone using this when I was still there many years ago. People usually just say I’m working from home with no exact term for it. (Some would probably call it skiving :D)

I’m not sure what the exact term for these words are but I’m aware there are a few borrowed words by German speakers that mean something completely different in the native language.


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