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  #81  
Old 12.08.2008, 15:29
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

I suggest you file that under "things not to say on a first date" along with "Hi, I'm boywonder, you better believe it baby."

dave


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My goodness....there's an echo here....is that you, Dad?

Barbra.
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  #82  
Old 12.08.2008, 16:29
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

Actually, folks, this substitution of English nouns for German ones, is an active Linguistic process going on in your brains, due to "Local Language Submersion" - in other words, being surrounded by German/Swiss German every day is causing it to happen to you subconsciously.

And resisting it is very difficult.......... goes against nature, you know!!
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  #83  
Old 12.08.2008, 16:43
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

hahahaha, so funny when i read the words you like, use!
id say keep it going to mix it with english. simply because
it helps you getting on with learning german, training vocab, knowing when "doch" means "yes it is.. " or "isnt it..." or what have you.
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  #84  
Old 12.08.2008, 18:12
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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...And resisting it is very difficult...
...but not futile, gält?
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  #85  
Old 12.08.2008, 18:21
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

Sometimes when i am having a conversation i can only think of the German word, and while i am really trying to remember the English word i can`t

Sorry it makes me so mad when that happens to me especially when i am talking to someone who cannot speak Geman
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  #86  
Old 12.08.2008, 21:03
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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...but not futile, gält?
Jawohl, Texaner!!

But what are you doing in Texas?
We need you here!
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  #87  
Old 12.08.2008, 21:21
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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...But what are you doing in Texas?
Trying to get a job offer in CH (and making my dog bilingual in the meantime ).
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  #88  
Old 12.08.2008, 22:04
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

After 7 years in Greater China I used a lot of Chinese words in my daily conversation.
Mafan, suibian, cha bu duo there is no real equivalent for these words.
Now that I am back in Switzerland, nobody understands what I am trying to say... ;-(
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  #89  
Old 12.08.2008, 22:31
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

As a German, I am usually more irritated by "German" terms used by my English speaking colleagues at work: They are usually Swiss German to say the least, quite often some Bernese slang words I would even not understand if they were pronounced correctly... And the rethorical "oder?" question at the end of each sentence already annoys me in German.

So my recommendation: Try to keep in mind where the term is used, is it Swiss or German?
You will get at least some funny looks if you ask for a "Stange" in Germany. The word means "stick" and is often used in Germany to describe an errect... well you guessed it. "Kann ich eine Stange haben?" will not get you a beer, oder?
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  #90  
Old 13.08.2008, 11:47
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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You will get at least some funny looks if you ask for a "Stange" in Germany. The word means "stick" and is often used in Germany to describe an errect... well you guessed it. "Kann ich eine Stange haben?" will not get you a beer, oder?
Well, it may get you a beer, but not in the way you expected it!!!!!!!!
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  #91  
Old 13.08.2008, 12:01
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

When you are caught off guard by someone speaking to you in heavy swiss german:

"You've been Chuchichäschtlied"

as in "I got to the counter and he Chuchichäschtlied me!"
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  #92  
Old 22.08.2009, 23:58
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

I've been here for so long that I throw (Swiss) German words into English sentences and don't even notice anymore....until of course my English-speaking counterpart raises an eyebrow and asks me what that last word was...such as "handy" for cell or "beziehungsweise" (??) or "grundsätzlich" (in principal).

My daughter only speaks Swiss-German to me at the moment. I love how she says, "so, so" and "Macht nüüt" (it doesn't matter / don't worry about it).
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  #93  
Old 23.08.2009, 00:41
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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Or how about when they ask how something is, replying with "it's no bad". Oh the fun we could have..... (OK I know I need to get a life).
Be careful with that one.

My american ex girlfriend had cooked for me in Scotland, and I said it was "not too bad". she was a wee bit un-cheerful for a couple of hours afterwards.

Doc.
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  #94  
Old 23.08.2009, 01:58
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

Quite a few times, people have referred to the 'badi' on EF.
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  #95  
Old 23.08.2009, 02:17
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

eshhh gueeet. Its now reflexive
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  #96  
Old 23.08.2009, 03:53
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

Don't use it so much any more but I used to say 'Scheiss die Wand an' quite often, also Schnecke for cute girls. My best friend in high school (U.S.) was Bavarian and picked up some bad habits from him. Also referred to anyone remotely ridiculous as a Popper.
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Old 23.08.2009, 17:48
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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Why has no-one mentioned "Natel"?

I use this all the time and find it more "comfortable" a word than "mobile phone".
Speaking of which, why doesn't anyone use "cell" as the name for a mobile phone?

As for me, I often find myself using "scheisse" and have caught myself on a few occasions saying "Tschüss" oder "Tschau" before hanging up the phone. I live in Canada! lol
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Old 23.08.2009, 23:51
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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Speaking of which, why doesn't anyone use "cell" as the name for a mobile phone?

As for me, I often find myself using "scheisse" and have caught myself on a few occasions saying "Tschüss" oder "Tschau" before hanging up the phone. I live in Canada! lol
At least you're not saying, "Tschau, Peter, Hoi", the way a lot of Berner do
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Old 24.08.2009, 09:32
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

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Speaking of which, why doesn't anyone use "cell" as the name for a mobile phone?

As for me, I often find myself using "scheisse" and have caught myself on a few occasions saying "Tschüss" oder "Tschau" before hanging up the phone. I live in Canada! lol
Cell is a nasty Americanism which is also spreading across Asia. I far prefer Handy or Mobile, and at a push NATEL.

is Tschau not Ciao misspelt?
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  #100  
Old 24.08.2009, 11:58
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Re: German words used by expats in English conversations

I kind of like people saying 'give me a telephone' when they expect you to call them
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