Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Language corner
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:08
adrianlondon's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 9,200
Groaned at 193 Times in 176 Posts
Thanked 25,643 Times in 6,892 Posts
adrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

http://www.gcse.com/english/affect.htm
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:09
economisto
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

....and IRREGARDLESS....
Quote:
View Post
One of my pet peeves is "I could care less", which literally means exactly the opposite of what the speaker is trying to convey.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #43  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:10
PaddyG's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pensier, Fribourg
Posts: 8,935
Groaned at 115 Times in 99 Posts
Thanked 15,962 Times in 5,631 Posts
PaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post
....and IRREGARDLESS....
Good one. I think people use it when they actually mean "Irrespective".
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:14
Dougal's Breakfast's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Ostschweiz
Posts: 16,555
Groaned at 1,063 Times in 822 Posts
Thanked 44,086 Times in 13,632 Posts
Dougal's Breakfast has a reputation beyond reputeDougal's Breakfast has a reputation beyond reputeDougal's Breakfast has a reputation beyond reputeDougal's Breakfast has a reputation beyond reputeDougal's Breakfast has a reputation beyond reputeDougal's Breakfast has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post
Sorry DB.
It obviously isn't my day.

As the quote you put in told the story, I though it would be OK.
Another time I'll delete or ask first.
Sorry Longbyt: My post was not meant to be a complaint about you doing your job - you were entirely within your rights to split the thread.

I just wanted to make it clear to anyone who discovered this thread after the split that generally I'm not a pedant when it comes to other people's use of language.

... unless they're advertising their services as proofreaders.

Sorry if my post came across as a criticism - that was not my intention.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Dougal's Breakfast for this useful post:
  #45  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:14
NSchulzi's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Zug
Posts: 2,429
Groaned at 56 Times in 37 Posts
Thanked 2,523 Times in 1,215 Posts
NSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post
This is quite a nice way to put it. I, fortunately, have a mother tongue helping me with those two..
Excellent - thanks! This puts it very succinctly: When you affect a situation, you have an effect on it.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:15
economisto
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

And when people use retrospective instead of retroactive which they seem to do constantly. The tax will be applied retroactively!
Quote:
View Post
Good one. I think people use it when they actually mean "Irrespective".
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:18
NSchulzi's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Zug
Posts: 2,429
Groaned at 56 Times in 37 Posts
Thanked 2,523 Times in 1,215 Posts
NSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Amazingly, some adults still refer to 'skellingtons' in the cupboard.

And I can't stand the use of was instead of were, as in 'we was walking down the road'.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:19
MusicChick's Avatar
modified and reprogrammed
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 11,210
Groaned at 122 Times in 98 Posts
Thanked 13,399 Times in 6,656 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post
Amazingly, some adults still refer to 'skellingtons' in the cupboard.
Yo and I go to the libary very often
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:20
economisto
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

I heard on BBC News 24 yesterday, "thousands of people attempted to mob the government building, of which only a few were let through."

....and it's the BBC!
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:20
PaddyG's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pensier, Fribourg
Posts: 8,935
Groaned at 115 Times in 99 Posts
Thanked 15,962 Times in 5,631 Posts
PaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond reputePaddyG has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post
Amazingly, some adults still refer to 'skellingtons' in the cupboard.
Reminds me of Ossy Ardiles playing for "Tottingham"
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:21
weejeem's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: .
Posts: 3,728
Groaned at 37 Times in 31 Posts
Thanked 5,874 Times in 2,467 Posts
weejeem has a reputation beyond reputeweejeem has a reputation beyond reputeweejeem has a reputation beyond reputeweejeem has a reputation beyond reputeweejeem has a reputation beyond reputeweejeem has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post
And when people use retrospective instead of retroactive which they seem to do constantly. The tax will be applied retroactively!
But retroactive (ex post facto) law can have retrospective effects.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:23
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 6,380
Groaned at 221 Times in 172 Posts
Thanked 7,910 Times in 4,272 Posts
greenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond repute
Re: English Proof Reader/Author Available

Quote:
View Post
Not really.

Unlike our Continental friends, we take a much more pragmatic, use-comes-first approach to language. We wouldn't stand for a committee telling us what we could and couldn't say. This is why the full, multi-volume edition of the Oxford English dictionary offers examples of how a word has been used throughout history rather than a definition. It's rather like case law for language.

Having said that, the standard grammar tome is Fowler's . . . even he 'ridiculed artificial grammatical rules without warrant in natural English usage'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Dicti..._English_Usage
1926's standards? God, that's why some people say you're conservative...
On a serious note, I learned English in school, and I remember having lessons about trades and occupations with words like "blacksmith", "carpenter" (very modern indeed) or commenting passages from Dickens' Bleak House...I mean, English native speakers you should see what other kids have learned in the English classes (I'm sure they changed the curriculum by now, I was the last generation to enjoy those handbooks)
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:26
economisto
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Yeah, they're almost always linked unless you're acting blindly or whatever, but that doesn't means they're interchangable. In any case, it seems to really grate.
Quote:
View Post
But retroactive (ex post facto) law can have retrospective effects.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:27
Angela-74's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kanton Neuchatel
Posts: 5,738
Groaned at 114 Times in 94 Posts
Thanked 5,665 Times in 2,772 Posts
Angela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post


Proof reading, you say?
que tonto !!! (how silly)
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:35
chiguy's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 511
Groaned at 4 Times in 4 Posts
Thanked 322 Times in 190 Posts
chiguy has an excellent reputationchiguy has an excellent reputationchiguy has an excellent reputationchiguy has an excellent reputation
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

I love The Oatmeal. These might be helpful, too:

10 Words You Need to Stop Misspelling

How to use a semicolon
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank chiguy for this useful post:
  #56  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:39
southiemiddles's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Wollishofen, Zurich
Posts: 186
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 122 Times in 54 Posts
southiemiddles has made some interesting contributions
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

This thread has made my day. Of course, I have an entire shelf dedicated to publication manuals and stylistic writing handbooks. I also know people that have broken up with romantic interests over "your great". I'm not quite that pedantic, but I do often do a mental face/palm when reading through emails.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:39
chiguy's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 511
Groaned at 4 Times in 4 Posts
Thanked 322 Times in 190 Posts
chiguy has an excellent reputationchiguy has an excellent reputationchiguy has an excellent reputationchiguy has an excellent reputation
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Quote:
View Post
Yo and I go to the libary very often
With the Internet, isn't this a mute point?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank chiguy for this useful post:
  #58  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:39
imogen's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 208
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 74 Times in 47 Posts
imogen has earned the respect of manyimogen has earned the respect of manyimogen has earned the respect of many
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

This thread is my idea of heaven.

*happy sigh*

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank imogen for this useful post:
  #59  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:41
NSchulzi's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Zug
Posts: 2,429
Groaned at 56 Times in 37 Posts
Thanked 2,523 Times in 1,215 Posts
NSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond reputeNSchulzi has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Use of the apostrophe and other linguistic pitfalls

Ooh yes, another pet hate is incorrect usage of less and fewer, which is becoming more and more commonplace. Errr, is usage spelt with an e???
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 25.03.2010, 16:44
Gastro Gnome's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,549
Groaned at 50 Times in 36 Posts
Thanked 2,856 Times in 1,550 Posts
Gastro Gnome has a reputation beyond reputeGastro Gnome has a reputation beyond reputeGastro Gnome has a reputation beyond reputeGastro Gnome has a reputation beyond reputeGastro Gnome has a reputation beyond reputeGastro Gnome has a reputation beyond repute
Re: English Proof Reader/Author Available

Quote:
View Post

1926's standards? God, that's why some people say you're conservative...
On a serious note, I learned English in school, and I remember having lessons about trades and occupations with words like "blacksmith", "carpenter" (very modern indeed) or commenting passages from Dickens' Bleak House...I mean, English native speakers you should see what other kids have learned in the English classes (I'm sure they changed the curriculum by now, I was the last generation to enjoy those handbooks)
If you read the Wiki article properly you'll see that the latest edition came out in 2004 and now it is usage based and compiled using corpus data.

So, no, it's only a standard by virtue of common use . . . which is exactly the way language works.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
apostrophe




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pitfalls to watch out for when transferring from US to CH? Mandalynn3 Permits/visas/government 1 13.10.2009 20:42
NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) Gianna Other/general 2 03.03.2009 12:17


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 21:44.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0