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  #161  
Old 07.10.2008, 12:57
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

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Read the subject... I had unwittingly committed a faux pas.

"The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]"

And thanks Louis Wu for translating. :-)
Yes i understood that... but i don't speak Swiss German so i just wondered what it meant..
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  #162  
Old 07.10.2008, 13:07
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

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Call me childish but i get the giggles everytime travelling from Basel to Interlaken, I see a massive exit sign to WANKDORF, so i wonder what are the people who come from that willage is called
Bubendorf too <snigger>
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  #163  
Old 07.10.2008, 18:34
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

Some mates and me actually do this intentionally.

So when we're felling good, we say we are "feeling pig wool", we may order a drink of "coca cola people", and when we don't know what to do we sit down and "duck divorce". It keeps everybody else totally confused, and even us sometimes.
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  #164  
Old 07.10.2008, 19:33
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

Can I play too?

It bothers me a little when English natives say "French cooisine"; why can it never sound like French cuisine... as well as "haute coutoure" instead of couture...

But I find it very cute when a guy says voila or c'est la vie trying to impress me.

I remember my boss wanting me to teach him the French way of greeting friends and me telling him: I am going to show you the French kiss -meaning the French way of kissing (on the cheeks of course!)

edited to add: I profusely apologized that day and no, I did not get a promotion!
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  #165  
Old 07.10.2008, 22:57
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

My husband likes to joke with the German word for Cotton - must be guy thing
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  #166  
Old 08.10.2008, 11:54
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

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We are just as childish laughing at this all the time as well particular when combined with "Gotthard"... on the same sign.
My husband and I always giggle like Beavis and Butthead at these:

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  #167  
Old 10.10.2008, 09:49
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

A local Kebab shop's slogan is "Flash Bistro – Where People Meat"

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  #168  
Old 13.10.2008, 11:18
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

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Call me childish but i get the giggles everytime travelling from Basel to Interlaken, I see a massive exit sign to WANKDORF, so i wonder what are the people who come from that willage is called
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We are just as childish laughing at this all the time as well particular when combined with "Gotthard"... on the same sign.
no wonder they still have a jungfrau, when the gotthard boys stay in wankdorf
plus first time i was here, i couldn't stop giggling. on the train, it was written like if you get special ticket then you would get a 6 day fahrt for free.

medicament for medicine
i will wash me
then the will often refers to would you like to or do you want to, ie will you eat?
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  #169  
Old 18.10.2008, 13:40
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

The one I like, perhaps because German-speakers are convinced this is proper English, is when they talk - when they are speaking German - about being "mobbed" at school. In my part of the world, that's called "bullying". Sure: you can be mobbed by autograph hunters if you're a famous author, or you can have customers mobbing a store when everything is on sale. But if, as we also used to say, you get "ganged up against" at school, it's hardly a mob you experience; it's just a bunch of your unpleasant, and all-too-often older, schoolmates - and it's just misery as well, especially if you are the victim...

J.
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  #170  
Old 15.09.2009, 11:34
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

Well, first up is spelling errors. For example, a gaff is a spear or fish hook. A gaffe is a social blunder.

On subject, the reflexive verb mistake gets to me... "We'll see us later" or "Let's meet us for dinner some time."
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  #171  
Old 15.09.2009, 11:42
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

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On subject, the reflexive verb mistake gets to me... "We'll see us later" or "Let's meet us for dinner some time."
Eh? Are those two examples the correct way of saying something? I would never say either of those; am I incorrect when I say, "We'll see you later" or "Let's meet for dinner some time"?
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  #172  
Old 15.09.2009, 15:42
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

i once sent an application in english (being my mother tongue) to a swiss company who wrote back in their rejection letter : "Unfortunately, we cannot consider your application for this position as we absolutely need a people who reads and writes fluently in english". i was gutted!
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  #173  
Old 15.09.2009, 15:46
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Re: The Wrong Word(s) [non-native speaker slip-ups]

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Eh? Are those two examples the correct way of saying something? I would never say either of those; am I incorrect when I say, "We'll see you later" or "Let's meet for dinner some time"?

No, the way you say it is correct but if you notice, what you said and what you quoted are not quite the same.


Edit as I forgot to add:

My Swiss hubby and I go back and forth over "taste" vs "smell" as they both seem to be covered in German / Swiss German (Baseldüütch maybe?) by "aroma" or "schmect" (however it is spelled). Aroma in the English dialects I am accustomed to (is it otherwise in UK and Aus?) generally being something you smell rather than taste.

My own attempts at German make him chuckle... I tend to put more effort in trying with his mom as she corrects me without the giggles a bit more often.

Last edited by Peg A; 15.09.2009 at 16:00. Reason: adding in my own contribution :p
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  #174  
Old 13.12.2010, 14:13
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swiss english

my boyfriend is constantly amusing me with newly invented english words... Swiss-German is his mother tongue, and for the past 5 years he's only spoken French (or swiss-french?)... he's now onto founding a new language, Swiss-English.

at first i thought it was just his own peculiar way of expression, but as i slowly started to pick up more french, I've realized he sometimes just takes the french word for what he wants to say and then modifies it to sound like an english word, with comical results.

whether or not it makes sense to an english speaker seems to be of no concern. sometimes when I try to correct him, he insists that he is right and i don't know real english anyway because I'm American!

just for a laugh, i thought i'd share some Martin-isms and see if anyone else has had similar experiences with these words

to rape - to grate. (from the french "râper", which in fact does mean "to grate") on several occasions, while cooking together, he'll ask me to "rape the cheese", which has never ceased to simultaneously alarm & amuse me.

to planify - to plan (he likes to add syllables to short words)

to have an argue - to have an argument (likewise, he likes to take away syllables from words he deems too long and cumbersome.)

may i borrow you a pencil? - may i borrow your pencil
i can borrow you some money - i can lend you some money
(apparently in swiss-german there is only one word for both concepts so he has difficulty remembering which one is which)

to be made redundant - to be laid off. (this one i learned was a British expression, which i've never heard of in the states, being a dumb american , but it stills provides a funny picture in my head.



.......of course, now when i'm trying to think of more, they are not really coming to mind. if anyone else has some funny expressions to add that they've heard, post away!
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  #175  
Old 13.12.2010, 14:21
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Re: swiss english

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sometimes when I try to correct him, he insists that he is right and i don't know real english anyway because I'm American!
Ha. Mine does that too, must be a flaw somewhere in his Intelligent Design.

There is a particular knack to making husbands shut up though. I can't really describe it in so many words, but I will be happy to show you sometime if you like. I learned it from a happily-married Greek woman, who learned it from her mother, who learned it from hers... so you see it is of quite respectable provenance. I am not sure whether it works on Swissies or not but it is certainly worth a try.

(edit: I'm quite sure we had a thread on this before... will see if I can hunt it up and merge the two...)
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  #176  
Old 13.12.2010, 14:24
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Re: swiss english

does it involve a frying pan to the head?
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  #177  
Old 13.12.2010, 14:25
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Re: swiss english

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to be made redundant - to be laid off. (this one i learned was a British expression, which i've never heard of in the states, being a dumb american , but it stills provides a funny picture in my head.
this is very common in British English, but both are used pretty much equally

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he insists that he is right and i don't know real english anyway because I'm American!
On this I agree with him 100%
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  #178  
Old 13.12.2010, 14:26
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Re: swiss english

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I don't know proper English anyway, because I'm American!
Fixed that for you...
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  #179  
Old 13.12.2010, 14:33
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Re: swiss english

Being made redundant is also a normal saying in America.
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  #180  
Old 13.12.2010, 14:40
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Re: swiss english

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Ha. Mine does that too, must be a flaw somewhere in his Intelligent Design.

There is a particular knack to making husbands shut up though. I can't really describe it in so many words, but I will be happy to show you sometime if you like. I learned it from a happily-married Greek woman, who learned it from her mother, who learned it from hers... so you see it is of quite respectable provenance. I am not sure whether it works on Swissies or not but it is certainly worth a try.
Aaaaaaaaaaaa ! conspiracy
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