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  #41  
Old 24.11.2010, 14:23
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Re: New English Words

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More of a concept like knowledge, uncountable.
What is? A 'learning'?

If it's uncountable why do people pluralise it?

I have no use of that word where 'lesson' would not suffice and sound infinitely more elegant.

'Learnings' is one of the ugliest bits of pseudo-English I've encountered.
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  #42  
Old 24.11.2010, 14:33
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Re: New English Words

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Mobile (telephone) = "Handy"

Swiss version better in my opinion. I find it amusing/sweet that the Swiss I know use the term (when speaking English) thinking that this is what we call them in English too.

I call it a mobile... and everyone else I know calls it that too at least that was in the "United of Kingdom"... I believe some call it the "Ph-izz-one", you "ge-zz-t me"?...
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  #43  
Old 24.11.2010, 14:36
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Re: New English Words

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embarrassed = pregnant
sensible = sensitive

I once had a dentist who told me my teeth were sensible.
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  #44  
Old 24.11.2010, 14:39
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Re: New English Words

And why do some German speakers insist on saying "walley"? (As in "Later, we will ski down into the walley")
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  #45  
Old 24.11.2010, 15:08
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Re: New English Words

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I thought 'Handy' was German German. In Switzerland people say 'Natel'.
I hear plenty of both from Swiss people in Basel, and Natel isn't exactly an English word - which I thought was the topic of this thread.
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  #46  
Old 24.11.2010, 15:10
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Re: New English Words

Inappropriate use of "the".
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  #47  
Old 24.11.2010, 16:36
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Re: New English Words

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Right up there with "informations" and "peoples". They teach English English here in CH now, previous generations were taught US-English, I guess neither involved any kind of study of plurals.
And some of our very own EF people: furnitures, stuffs ...drives me mad, mad I say!

BTW: my former boss used to end every single sentence with ...or? (as in German Oder?)
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  #48  
Old 24.11.2010, 16:53
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Re: New English Words

When they enter a room with people " Hello all together" instead of "Hello every one"
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  #49  
Old 24.11.2010, 17:20
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Re: New English Words

Nothing to do with the Swiss, but I have a spanish customer who always says "dude" meaning a problem... I have a dude... Can anyone explain this one????
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  #50  
Old 24.11.2010, 17:45
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Re: New English Words

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Nothing to do with the Swiss, but I have a spanish customer who always says "dude" meaning a problem... I have a dude... Can anyone explain this one????
(I have da doubt) = dudo?
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  #51  
Old 24.11.2010, 17:59
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Re: New English Words

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Nothing to do with the Swiss, but I have a spanish customer who always says "dude" meaning a problem... I have a dude... Can anyone explain this one????
Dude mean problem as bla bla bla bla mean lot of talk ....
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  #52  
Old 24.11.2010, 18:01
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Re: New English Words

Pacific, often used instead of specific.

Can you be more pacific ?

English people in London seem to do this a lot. I thought I had escaped it but no someone (English) at work does it too.
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  #53  
Old 24.11.2010, 20:57
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Re: New English Words

Some english words ARE confusing!

Remind = Remember: I always have to think twice.

Beard = Bird: I just can't pronounce it. Used to tell my bf 'Ouch, you're growing a bird on your face!'

I've got a question for the native speakers: is it 1 person, 2 people or 1 person, 2 persons?
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  #54  
Old 25.11.2010, 09:46
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Re: New English Words

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I've got a question for the native speakers: is it 1 person, 2 people or 1 person, 2 persons?
Both, it depends on the specific context. People is more common though so best to use it when in doubt.
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  #55  
Old 25.11.2010, 09:50
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Re: New English Words

Before we lambast the Swiss for mis-using our language, best we take a look in the mirror 1st...

would of?

there, they're, their?

I could care less?

(not most people here of course, but English speakers in general)
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  #56  
Old 25.11.2010, 09:57
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Re: New English Words

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Beamer - what is it called in English then? I came here long before they came into use and I thought it was English too.
(Slide) Projector
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  #57  
Old 25.11.2010, 10:01
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Re: New English Words

You will never forget the name of the sticky white paper rings to reinforce loose pages in a file, "Eisbär Arschlöcher" ... sorry, a bit rude!
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  #58  
Old 25.11.2010, 10:36
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Re: New English Words

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You will never forget the name of the sticky white paper rings to reinforce loose pages in a file, "Eisbär Arschlöcher" ... sorry, a bit rude!
Explain please
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  #59  
Old 25.11.2010, 10:37
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Re: New English Words

When did the plural of roof become roofs?

Let's not forget that English is not the easiest language in the world. It's about the only language that I know of that there is an exception for EVERY rule. So are they really rules? I before E, except after C. What kind of rule is that?

And don't get me started on words having more than one meaning with the same exact same spelling. "You would desert (leave) your desert (pudding) in the desert (barren waste land) for a glass of cold water." Madness I tell you, madness!
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Last edited by Nelly_Da_Hefferlump; 25.11.2010 at 10:40. Reason: I can't spell for sh1t!
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  #60  
Old 25.11.2010, 10:51
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Re: New English Words

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When did the plural of roof become roofs?

Let's not forget that English is not the easiest language in the world. It's about the only language that I know of that there is an exception for EVERY rule. So are they really rules? I before E, except after C. What kind of rule is that?

And don't get me started on words having more than one meaning with the same exact same spelling. "You would desert (leave) your desert (pudding) in the desert (barren waste land) for a glass of cold water." Madness I tell you, madness!
Pudding is spelled (spelt?) dessert, and I'm sure that desert (verb) and desert (noun) derive from the same root ie abandoned, wasteland etc (though I may be wrong).
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