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Old 09.07.2011, 10:24
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

You didn't understand that those degrees are NOT one-year only courses. I edited because I understood that you didn't get the irony of my previous message and getting into an argument about the IB is useless in your case. I am trying to be nice here, but you make it very hard. You are young...

On that note, I remind you that you FAILED entrance requirements. If Geneva British school didn't let you in, what makes you think that you can get into another british one?

EDIT: Make sure you don't overlook that message. Listen to cmyers!!
List of schools that offer A levels.


EDIT: Message restored after error deleting. Sorry for that.
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  #22  
Old 09.07.2011, 10:46
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

Shakur, a lot of very experienced and knowledgeable people are trying to help you here- taking much time to do so, so please listen to them.
I was a 6th form specialist teacher in a school in the UK for many years. I can assure you that UK Universities DO look very carefully at BOTH GCSE and A'Level results, and that a 'C' grade in maths is an absolute requirement. Even if you get 3 or 4 As. That is a FACT. So whatever you do, you will have to re-take maths and pass (C minimum). Fortunately, this can be done alongside AS Level in Year 12.

As I said before, there are State Schools in the UK where you can study for free and only pay for the boarding facilities. In the past, those schools were for the children of Army personel serving abroad, but nowadays they are open to all. There are not many though. My school was in the Midlands, in a small University town. The boarding facilities were provided in a lovely Georgian House, and was mixed, boys and girls- aged 11 to about 19. The staff were great, very friendly and the atmosphere was just like a big family. This school does not have a uniform, some might. They organised lots of visits, activities, etc. The school taught all the subjects NOT offered generally for Int Bac- like sport, law, psychology, IT, design, music, IT, as well as all the traditional subjects.
pm if you'd like details of the school. I'll also go and look at the link for the State boarding schools in general and will then edit with the link.
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  #23  
Old 09.07.2011, 10:53
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

The link for State boarding schools in the UK is

www.sbsa.org.uk

The current fees for my old school are 9360 per year (+ pocket money and purchase of study books etc). This is term-time only and you would have to return home, or find a local family (school can help with this) for holidays.

Hope this helps. The decision is yours- but listen to those who know, please.

pm if you want the link to my old school- there is a good video on it that will give you an impression of what it is like.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:06
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

Taking and passing your A levels without having the minimum C in the GCSE will be much more difficult than you think. As you seem to have found out, you may be allowed by some schools to take the A level course without having previously taken the GCSE course, but if you look around and listen to people, this is not recommended (unless you have been out of school for some time and are considered a mature student, which in most cases means you are around 20+ years old). The GCSE level courses provide some very necessary background and build towards the A level syllabus. Without the GCSE level, you are missing this knowledge, which is most likely why you haven't met the minimum requirements for the course (you failed the basic knowledge required tests). The schools understand what knowledge is required for success in their courses, which is why those tests are administered. If you enter an A level course without the required knowledge, you may actually hold the whole class back, which at that level, is unfair and unwanted by anyone.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:19
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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First of all Shakur, I would strongly recommend you retake GCSE maths while completing your A Levels. Maudthecat was right, maths GCSE is required at grade C to get entry to most UK universities (the same is true for English Language). I'm surprised you have not seen this requirement as you said you've extensively researched for yourself. You mentioned Russell Group universities, I checked a couple: Oxford require a C in GCSE maths, and UCL a B.



But you will be expected to have very good GCSE grades. From Nottingham 'A GCSE record should contain outstanding grades of A and A*.' And from LSE 'Most have already achieved excellent GCSE grades including the majority at A* and A. The Law selectors consider not just the number of top GCSE grades that you have, but also your overall GCSE subject profile.' So your GCSE grades are important.

Law is a very popular programme, something I think you have overlooked. It is especially competitive at the Russell Group universities. Having 3 A Levels at grade A isn't enough. For the top 10 ranked law programmes the average no. UCAS points on entry was about 500. 3 A grades at A Level is only 360 points. So you see the problem with having just 3 A levels. Also bear in mind that some universities require you to take the LNAT.

I would suggest you do some more research and some serious thinking before going any further.
Did you find any other universities requiring Maths? So far I have seen UCL and warwick and 2 other universities that require Maths other then that I don't, and I wont take maths sorry.

Here is a copy paste of UCL in the email I have sent them

Dear A Ghattour

Thank you for your email.

It is a part of the entry requirements for all undergraduate programmes at UCL that GCSE English Language and Maths are passed with grades B at GCSE level. Although it is unlikely that an offer of a place would be made to a candidate who does not meet the entry requirements, an application would not be unsuccessful based upon GCSE performance alone. The Faculty Tutor has the discretion to waive the GCSE requirements if an application is particularly outstanding.

If candidates have had disruption to their education which may have affected their grades, full details of this can be outlined in the Reference section of the UCAS application form. Our admissions tutors will then take this information into consideration when making a decision on the application.

Further information on the LLB degree programmes can be found on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/prospective/undergraduate/index.shtml

Please do not hesitate to email should you have any further queries.

Yours sincerely


Undergraduate Admissions
UCL Faculty of Laws


Here is from LSE

Tue, May 17, 2011 2:10:43 PMRE: Application






Dear Student

Many thanks for your interest in studying at LSE.

LLB Bachelor of Laws – 2012 Entry


There are no specific course requirements for the LLB, although a standard pattern will be a range of good grades at GCSE level (if taken) followed by three A levels and accompanied by a fourth AS level, normally taken in Year 12. The Cambridge Law Studies Test is not considered a relevant qualification for entry.

The usual standard offer would be three GCE A levels with grades A* A A, with and A* in a generally preferred subject. There will be some flexibility for candidates in exceptional circumstances.

For the International Baccalaureate, we would require the Diploma with 38 points including grades 7 6 6 or 6 6 6 at Higher level.

Other qualifications are considered.

Each application received is carefully considered on an individual basis, taking into account the full range of information presented on the UCAS form including personal statement, academic achievement (including both past and predicted grades), subject combinations and references, before a final decision is made.
As you will see from the individual programme information, there is a great deal of competition for places at the School. In 2010, we received 19,000 applications for 1,200 places. This means that if you are predicted or if you achieve the grades set out in the standard offer, unfortunately this will not guarantee you an offer of admission.
Before completing your application you should also refer to the Completing your application section and read the information on the Admissions Criteria pages and on the UCAS Entry Profiles.

GCSEs
The School takes into account the school background of its applicants, although this is not the key element in decision making and we take into account the full range of information presented on the UCAS form, including the personal statement and reference.
Certain departments look for a number of A or A* grades at GCSE. If this is the case, it will be mentioned in the admissions criteria.

Yours sincerely



Student Recruitment Office, LSE
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra...duateHome.aspx
stu.rec@lse.ac.uk


Just to show you how I can get in without good grades in GCSE.

I know about the LNAT.

And the last one Oxford university :

Dear Ali,

Thank you for your email.

There is no absolute requirement for particular grades or subjects at GCSE, as there are no fixed examination results that must be attained for admission. Each application is considered carefully on its individual merits. However, competition for places is strong and many applicants have all A* and A grades at GCSE. Unless there are particular extenuating circumstances, we could not be optimistic about your chances of gaining a place at Oxford if you do not have a high percentage of A* and A grades at GCSE.

Tutors are looking for evidence of academic ability as well as commitment and motivation for your chosen degree course. They will use GCSE results as one indicator of your abilities, along with predicted grades at A-level, your personal statement, your academic reference, any written work or written test that are required and, if your application is shortlisted, your performance at interview.

At A-Level, there are no specific subject requirements for studying Law at Oxford. All subjects are acceptable for admissions purposes, with the exception of General Studies. We recommend that you take those subjects you enjoy the most, and where you are most likely to achieve the best grades. Conditional offers are usually for three A grades at A-level.

All courses at Oxford are highly academic in nature, and require a great deal of reading. You would usually be expected to write one or two essays each week. Therefore, you may wish to choose academic A-levels, which involve essay writing, as this would help to prepare you for the style of studying at Oxford.

We always recommend that students read widely around their subject, deepening their knowledge and understanding, to help prepare for their application. Tutors will be looking for evidence of students' academic potential, as well as their commitment and motivation to their course, so will certainly be looking for evidence that a student has really engaged with their subject, and has a passion for studying it. This is particularly important for subjects like Law, which most students do not study at their school or college. Many sources of information about Law can be useful, and we would encourage students to take a critical approach to whatever they read or hear about, and try to consider different sides of any case.

For example, it would be a good idea to follow legal stories which are being covered in the media, and also to read journals such as law reviews. You can just search the internet to find many different reviews, freely available on line. You might also like to have a look at an introductory law text book such as 'Learning the Law' by Glanville Williams. Also, the BBC offers an interesting free podcast called 'Law in Action', which you can download from www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/law/.

I hope this has been of some help; please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further queries.

With best wishes,

Undergraduate Admissions

University of Oxford
Wellington Square
Oxford

I still have emails from cambridge...etc but I won't post them

Last edited by shakur; 09.07.2011 at 11:37.
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  #26  
Old 09.07.2011, 11:31
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

Evidence indeed- which I do find strange as I've worked very closely with UCAS over a long period of time. I do hope therefore that you are able to demonstrate that you are really exceptional and worth waving the requirement for GCSE grade C in maths (and English). I am absolutely sure that if you do apply to a UK school, they would very strongly advise that you do take those.
Good luck.

PS Please edit the post above to remove your real name, as it is never a good idea on a Forum or internet in general.
PPS. A thank you would have been appreciated, and polite, but never mind.
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  #27  
Old 09.07.2011, 11:33
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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You didn't understand that those degrees are NOT one-year only courses. I edited because I understood that you didn't get the irony of my previous message and getting into an argument about the IB is useless in your case. I am trying to be nice here, but you make it very hard. You are young...

On that note, I remind you that you FAILED entrance requirements. If Geneva British school didn't let you in, what makes you think that you can get into another british one?

EDIT: Make sure you don't overlook that message. Listen to cmyers!!
List of schools that offer A levels.
All schools have their own entry requirements, they all differ from each other.

I am not being rude, but actually you are, you don't even know what is A level I had to give you its information.



Quote:
Shakur, a lot of very experienced and knowledgeable people are trying to help you here- taking much time to do so, so please listen to them.
I was a 6th form specialist teacher in a school in the UK for many years. I can assure you that UK Universities DO look very carefully at BOTH GCSE and A'Level results, and that a 'C' grade in maths is an absolute requirement. Even if you get 3 or 4 As. That is a FACT. So whatever you do, you will have to re-take maths and pass (C minimum). Fortunately, this can be done alongside AS Level in Year 12.

As I said before, there are State Schools in the UK where you can study for free and only pay for the boarding facilities. In the past, those schools were for the children of Army personel serving abroad, but nowadays they are open to all. There are not many though. My school was in the Midlands, in a small University town. The boarding facilities were provided in a lovely Georgian House, and was mixed, boys and girls- aged 11 to about 19. The staff were great, very friendly and the atmosphere was just like a big family. This school does not have a uniform, some might. They organised lots of visits, activities, etc. The school taught all the subjects NOT offered generally for Int Bac- like sport, law, psychology, IT, design, music, IT, as well as all the traditional subjects.
pm if you'd like details of the school. I'll also go and look at the link for the State boarding schools in general and will then edit with the link.
I am listening to them, and I am actually reviewing it one by one and reading carefully.

I have posted emails from universities I emailed down.

This state school is interesting

Quote:
The link for State boarding schools in the UK is

www.sbsa.org.uk

The current fees for my old school are 9360 per year (+ pocket money and purchase of study books etc). This is term-time only and you would have to return home, or find a local family (school can help with this) for holidays.

Hope this helps. The decision is yours- but listen to those who know, please.

pm if you want the link to my old school- there is a good video on it that will give you an impression of what it is like.
Will do. Thanks for that little boost !

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Taking and passing your A levels without having the minimum C in the GCSE will be much more difficult than you think. As you seem to have found out, you may be allowed by some schools to take the A level course without having previously taken the GCSE course, but if you look around and listen to people, this is not recommended (unless you have been out of school for some time and are considered a mature student, which in most cases means you are around 20+ years old). The GCSE level courses provide some very necessary background and build towards the A level syllabus. Without the GCSE level, you are missing this knowledge, which is most likely why you haven't met the minimum requirements for the course (you failed the basic knowledge required tests). The schools understand what knowledge is required for success in their courses, which is why those tests are administered. If you enter an A level course without the required knowledge, you may actually hold the whole class back, which at that level, is unfair and unwanted by anyone.
If you look carefully at what I said, I never took those subjects, and they weren't general knowledge ... they were PRE-AS the paper said it all, it was written in the top PRE-AS exam....

How can I get general knowledge to something I don't know about? that's impossible.

In A levels you are allowed to take new subjects if you wish. Oxford sixth form college its year fee's is 15000 gave me an offer without doing tests because I told them I am taking new subjects. And they have accepted it.


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Taking and passing your A levels without having the minimum C in the GCSE will be much more difficult than you think. As you seem to have found out, you may be allowed by some schools to take the A level course without having previously taken the GCSE course, but if you look around and listen to people, this is not recommended (unless you have been out of school for some time and are considered a mature student, which in most cases means you are around 20+ years old). The GCSE level courses provide some very necessary background and build towards the A level syllabus. Without the GCSE level, you are missing this knowledge, which is most likely why you haven't met the minimum requirements for the course (you failed the basic knowledge required tests). The schools understand what knowledge is required for success in their courses, which is why those tests are administered. If you enter an A level course without the required knowledge, you may actually hold the whole class back, which at that level, is unfair and unwanted by anyone.
Who said I didn't take the course? I have it. I passed my subjects above C.

Not taking the course will be impossible to enter to university that is why I did.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:35
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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Did you find any other universities requiring Maths?
That's not my job, I was just giving a few examples to show you that I would highly recommend maths.

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Just to show you how I can get in without good grades in GCSE.
Nowhere in the 3 emails (all of which are standard replies) you've shown does it say you don't need good GCSE grades. Maybe if you told us your grades it would give us more an idea. But if will be very difficult if you have poor grades. And even if maths is not required, a fail will look very bad. Law is very popular and competitive and there will be upwards of 10 people applying for every place. People, who know what they're talking about, are trying to help but it seems their advice is falling on deaf ears.

Oh, and maybe remove the personal information from those emails.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:35
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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Evidence indeed- which I do find strange as I've worked very closely with UCAS over a long period of time. I do hope therefore that you are able to demonstrate that you are really exceptional and worth waving the requirement for GCSE grade C in maths (and English). I am absolutely sure that if you do apply to a UK school, they would very strongly advise that you do take those.
Good luck.

PS Please edit the post above to remove your real name, as it is never a good idea on a Forum or internet in general.
PPS. A thank you would have been appreciated, and polite, but never mind.
Sorry I edited then I was replying to the others posts ^^ well thanks !

I am planning to be exceptional also on my extra curriculum which I am planning to become the champion of my home country in Tennis, and wish with that I can get prioritized !
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:39
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

In which case my old school would be excellent as it is a Specialist Sport College, linked to a Specialist Sport University.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:40
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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That's not my job, I was just giving a few examples to show you that I would highly recommend maths.



Nowhere in the 3 emails (all of which are standard replies) you've shown does it say you don't need good GCSE grades. Maybe if you told us your grades it would give us more an idea. But if will be very difficult if you have poor grades. And even if maths is not required, a fail will look very bad. Law is very popular and competitive and there will be upwards of 10 people applying for every place. People, who know what they're talking about, are trying to help but it seems their advice is falling on deaf ears.

Oh, and maybe remove the personal information from those emails.
I have the GCSE course, I didn't say I haven't done it, I only didn't do Maths thats all, I have A french C english C arabic, I have resat sciences this year which the results will come out in august.

Now I know you are going to say that english is low and I should re take it, but my plan is, since I am going to take English literature and to achieve A
It will show them that I can improve very good.

If you read carefully it say so that under circumstances you don't need good grades.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:40
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

Odile,
these e-mails can be read differently depending on how much experience one has with education. Universities have to keep one sentence everywhere that allows them to prevent formal complaints from unsuccesful students and that alllows them to take students with maximum flexibility. All those e-mails show one thing: top grades or nothing. The rest is administrative rhetorics.
I especially loved the requirement A* a prerequisit. Even A students get denied nowadays... that should be a hint for a student who can't pass a GCSE math test.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:44
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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Odile,
these e-mails can be read differently depending on how much experience one has with education. Universities have to keep one sentence everywhere that allows them to prevent formal complaints from unsuccesful students and that alllows them to take students with maximum flexibility. All those e-mails show one thing: top grades or nothing. The rest is administrative rhetorics.
I especially loved the requirement A* a prerequisit. Even A students get denied nowadays... that should be a hint for a student who can't pass a GCSE math test.
It is true, what about someone having extra curricular activites and actually being champion? I know I can do that, I am soon going to achieve this goal, but what I have noticed is that ALL sports player with good background are taken into universities..

And no, most of the students are educated in a good environment, I wasn't, my situation was very very bad and I don't want to write it here as if you guys would pity for me.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:47
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

How many GCSEs do/will you have? And you may struggle to get on an A level course. For my college, a state school sixth form, you needed at least a B at GCSE in a subject to take the corresponding A Level.

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... but what I have noticed is that ALL sports player with good background are taken into universities..
The UK is not the US, you will not be admitted to university based solely on the fact that you can play tennis.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:52
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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How many GCSEs do/will you have? And you may struggle to get on an A level course. For my college, a state school sixth form, you needed at least a B at GCSE in a subject to take the corresponding A Level.



The UK is not the US, you will not be admitted to university based solely on the fact that you can play tennis.
I haven't even thought about US.. UK actually gives places to top players and scores...

I will have 6 in total.
Well I had to talk with the principal of the oxford sixth form college and he asked all those different questions and so on, and I shared with him what I have been through so he accepted me.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:55
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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what I have noticed is that ALL sports player with good background are taken into universities..
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I haven't even thought about US.. UK actually gives places to top players and scores...
I'm curious to know whence you get these notions.
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Old 09.07.2011, 11:57
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

I'm sorry to break it to you, but 6 GCSEs is not enough, especially as some are not at top grades and some have been resat, the results of which I'm guessing will also not be top grades. I'm not being mean, I just think you need to know. I'd strongly recommend you think about your future, as I don't think the academic route is for you. Though I'd be delighted if you proved me wrong.
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Old 09.07.2011, 12:06
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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On that note, I remind you that you FAILED entrance requirements. If Geneva British school didn't let you in, what makes you think that you can get into another british one?
Shakur,
you can groan me as much as you want, you still have to ask yourself the question above. You don't have to give me the answer, but you do have to open your eyes.
I still love you, don't worry. *insert experience teacher smiley here*
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Old 09.07.2011, 12:45
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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If you look carefully at what I said, I never took those subjects, and they weren't general knowledge ... they were PRE-AS the paper said it all, it was written in the top PRE-AS exam....

How can I get general knowledge to something I don't know about? that's impossible.
Sorry, maybe my message wasn't clear enough. I meant the "genereal knowledge" of the course you are trying to take. Meaning, in order for you to be successful at the A level, you are expected to have a certain amount of knowledge in that subject, which is normally supplied at the GCSE level. Some students have the required knowledge without taking the GCSE level, which is why, even if they haven't taken a course before, they are still able to pass the entry tests and are allowed to continue. The normal reason they allow mature students to enter the A level courses without the GCSE course is that it is assumed that they have gained some life experience that will help them in their schooling (along with being more mature when it comes to homework etc.).
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Old 09.07.2011, 13:08
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Re: List of schools that offer A levels.

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Sorry, maybe my message wasn't clear enough. I meant the "genereal knowledge" of the course you are trying to take. Meaning, in order for you to be successful at the A level, you are expected to have a certain amount of knowledge in that subject, which is normally supplied at the GCSE level. Some students have the required knowledge without taking the GCSE level, which is why, even if they haven't taken a course before, they are still able to pass the entry tests and are allowed to continue. The normal reason they allow mature students to enter the A level courses without the GCSE course is that it is assumed that they have gained some life experience that will help them in their schooling (along with being more mature when it comes to homework etc.).
I understand that. But I don't have general knowledge of the subjects I have been tested, and I am supposed to learn it throughout the year instead. I am not yet a mature student.
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