Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Other/general  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 26.05.2010, 06:06
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Geneva
Posts: 9
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
New Swiss has no particular reputation at present
Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

Hi everyone...

I'm about moving to Switzerland in two weeks and thinking of things to bring with me there. I'm thinking of shipping one of my plasma TVs with me but not sure if that is a good idea, understanding that I need to buy electronic converter... Would anybody please advise?

In general, is it a good idea to ship eletronics from USA to Switzerland? Or which ones are good to ship and which ones are not good to ship?

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 26.05.2010, 06:20
Shinigami's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Valais, Switzerland
Posts: 839
Groaned at 7 Times in 6 Posts
Thanked 366 Times in 244 Posts
Shinigami has a reputation beyond reputeShinigami has a reputation beyond reputeShinigami has a reputation beyond reputeShinigami has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland

I'm not sure I'd like to risk shipping something fragile like a plasma TV from the US... if you don't have the original box and packaging, it may suffer in transit. Depending on how old it is, you may also run into incompatibilities due to what was originally the difference in the refresh rates between NTSC and PAL/SECAM (although most TV's these days do both fine).

There's a lot I would just not bother bringing over unless it's very new (you could still sell it for a decent price back in the US if it's not too old!) or very special (a high-end microwave unit that cannot be bought here for example).

Small things like mp3 players will be fine, some phones may not work unless they support all the bands, a radio/stereo should be fine (just need a converter in most cases), some computer components may have switches to use the local current rating as well, but just remember that anything which needs an adapter, will mean buying one more device between the socket and the product in question, thus costing you extra $$$ for that device (good ones don't come cheap, i.e. the ones which are well secure, won't pose a fire hazard, etc), they'll take up space (due often to their relatively large size) and may need ventilation (so can't be hidden entirely out of view under a rug, in a cupboard, and so on).

Others may chip in with extra advice depending on their experience of course.
__________________
"Mommy, mommy! That man has ears!"
"Yes dear, we all have ears..."
"But mommy, he has CAT ears!"
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 26.05.2010, 07:25
foliorose's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Zürich Seefeld
Posts: 379
Groaned at 10 Times in 6 Posts
Thanked 306 Times in 146 Posts
foliorose has earned some respectfoliorose has earned some respect
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland

I do not recommend bringing any electronics from the USA to Switzerland. My husband and I brought our Powerbooks over a few years ago and even with the adapter we bought directly from Apple, our batteries still got fried and stopped holding a charge after a few months.

You can find a lot of high quality used items in Switzerland. Or, buy what you need new and sell it when you go. For smaller things, you can bring them back to the US. Using a generic plug converter on my Sonicare toothbrush that has Swiss plugs has been great the past few years. Going from 220 to 110 isn't a problem. It's the other way around that destroys your stuff!!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 26.05.2010, 08:13
southiemiddles's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Wollishofen, Zurich
Posts: 186
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 122 Times in 54 Posts
southiemiddles has made some interesting contributions
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland

Your TV will not generally not convert - a US TV runs on NTSC, a TV for most of the rest of the world runs on PAL. If you're using HDMI, you could theoretically bring your TV over, as long as you run your TV at 720p or 1080i/p. The issue, of course, is that your TV is most likely not convert 110V/50Hz to 230V/60Hz. Unless you enjoy the constant hum of a voltage adapter, I'd recommend selling your TV in the US and buying a new one here.

For everything else, check to see if it is 110V-240V (50Hz-60Hz) adaptable, which it should say on the power adapter (or where the plug attaches to the item, or the bottom of the item). If it does, fantastic, you can bring it. If it has an external power supply, you can "usually" bring it. If it is not adaptable from 110V-240V, you cannot bring it unless you plan on using a ton of "step-down" voltage adapters (and they tend to hum).

However, some notes:

-Your DVD player is region-specific. That is, it only plays DVDs from the US/Canada. If you buy any DVDs here or the UK, it will not play on your US DVD player. However, never fear, you can purchase "gray market" region-free DVD players, where they've removed the region-specific chip after market. Blu-Ray is also region-specific, and I'm fairly certain you can buy region-free Blu-Ray players. Gray-market region-free DVD/Blu-Ray players tend to be 110V-240V switchable for the simple reason that the shops that convert them send them the world over, but do make sure.

-Your printer, if new enough, is probably 110V-240V switchable. However, we recently learned that HP printer cartridges are region-specific. However, never fear, after stocking up on printer ink, if you run out, you can do a complete change of inks, and HP will reset your printer to run on new inks. Or you can just stock up whenever you go back to the States.

-If you have a Wii, it will convert, but you have to buy a new power brick. It'll run you about 40 CHF. The US power brick is for 110V/ 60 Hz, and the new one is for 220/230V, 50 Hz. Being external, it'll convert to whatever voltage and frequency a Wii runs on.

-Your computers - it depends on how old they are. Our MacBook Pro, Dell Inspiron, and iMac all converted from 110V to 240V and from 50Hz to 60Hz. Newer Macs convert from 110 to 240V, with an internal variable power supply. Older Macs (such as the old MacBook that predates the MacBook Pro) do not convert. Dell laptops tend to run on an external power supply, so you should be able to convert it if it is old enough not to have a 110V-240V variable adapter, but do check. Unless you have an ancient iPod, the external power charger for that should also convert, but check the item.

-Your hair dryer, curling iron, flat iron, etc. will not convert. Keep them in your suitcase for trips back to the US if you want, or sell them in a garage sale.

-Most of your kitchen appliances will not convert (but check). My Cuisinart did not convert, so we bought new here. I already knew that a KitchenAid didn't, so I didn't buy one.

-Your cell phone will not convert unless you have a tri-band phone. That does not mean 3G. Look in the instruction manual. Don't plan on keeping your US cell number unless you've got millions to spend on international roaming charges.

-Your landline phones will not convert, as the plugs are different here. Vonage will work, but you will need a US handset to plug into it.

And one final note:
Using one of the adapters you buy at the airport (and electronics stores) DOES NOT CHANGE THE VOLTAGE unless you paid a crapload of money for it and it says that it converts voltage. Even then, I'd make sure it has some sort of guarantee. Most of the adapters are JUST PLUG ADAPTERS. That is, it just changes the plug from US to EU or UK or wherever. My mother is constantly surprised that her flat iron gets fried whenever she comes over, despite her father and daughter being electrical engineers. IF you have an item that has adaptable power supply, you can just change the plug once you get here (if you're handy), or you can use a plug adapter (we've done both). If your item does not have a variable power supply, plugging it into a plug adapter will just kill the item when you arrive.

So, do a bit of homework. We brought a fair amount of things over. Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 26.05.2010, 21:35
AW1's Avatar
AW1 AW1 is offline
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
AW1 has no particular reputation at present
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland

Don't bring anything that doesn't say 110-240 volts on the power adapter (usually laptops, phone chargers)except lamps, just need to change the bulbs on those. You can always cut the cords to adapt the plugs. Anything else is a major hassle.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 26.05.2010, 21:52
the_clangers's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO was St Prex, VD
Posts: 1,999
Groaned at 17 Times in 14 Posts
Thanked 1,185 Times in 697 Posts
the_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Hi everyone...

I'm about moving to Switzerland in two weeks and thinking of things to bring with me there. I'm thinking of shipping one of my plasma TVs with me but not sure if that is a good idea, understanding that I need to buy electronic converter... Would anybody please advise?

In general, is it a good idea to ship eletronics from USA to Switzerland? Or which ones are good to ship and which ones are not good to ship?

Thanks!
Not really. Large, high power consumption devices that depend on the powerline frequency being 50 or 60hz respectively are a bit of a problem.

Having said that, I did bring my 80G PS3 to CH and use it with my PAL CH television. That way I can watch my US BluRay and DVDs over here.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 26.05.2010, 22:01
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

We brought all of our computers, monitors and a printer. They were fine, we just switched out the plugs. As everyone else has said, check the voltage, make sure it converts.



If you want to buy electrical equipment that can be used in europe before you leave the us, there are some vendors in the uS. Note that they may only deliver to the US, but if you have a moving company, this can be more inexpensive than buying new, as long as it looks like you've owned the equipment at least 6 months (Otherwise you're taxed upon entry for bringing in new goods).
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 26.05.2010, 22:24
luminousmind08's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Little o, Zürich
Posts: 691
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 354 Times in 200 Posts
luminousmind08 has a reputation beyond reputeluminousmind08 has a reputation beyond reputeluminousmind08 has a reputation beyond reputeluminousmind08 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

I'd leave the tv at home. I brought everything else (amp, blue ray, wii, etc.) and everything works fine. Be sure to buy the converter over there, as you will save some cash. And remember to pack a U.S. power bar!

The reason to leave the tv @ home, especially if it's a plasma, is you will most likely have performance issues even with the converter. TV's are pretty cheap here as well.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 26.08.2010, 19:35
sigheat's Avatar
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 24
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 8 Times in 2 Posts
sigheat has no particular reputation at present
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

Quote:
View Post
. And remember to pack a U.S. power bar!


In regards to the power bar, so if I plug in my us based products into the US power bar/strip with the US power strip having a plug converter, I should be fine as long as all the products I plug in are 120-240?

So I could have my Wii and P2/3 plugged into the powerstrip as long as the powerstrip plug has been conversted into the Swiss plug?


Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 26.08.2010, 19:36
sigheat's Avatar
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 24
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 8 Times in 2 Posts
sigheat has no particular reputation at present
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

For those that brought a Wii and PS2/3 over from the states. Do games purchases in Switzerland work on the Wii and PS2/3?

Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 26.08.2010, 22:36
the_clangers's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO was St Prex, VD
Posts: 1,999
Groaned at 17 Times in 14 Posts
Thanked 1,185 Times in 697 Posts
the_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond reputethe_clangers has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

Quote:
View Post
For those that brought a Wii and PS2/3 over from the states. Do games purchases in Switzerland work on the Wii and PS2/3?

Thanks.
Not always. It depends on whether or not the manufacturer has enabled the region lock on the video game. If not, then the game will play everywhere. If so, then ...
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 27.08.2010, 00:25
sigheat's Avatar
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 24
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 8 Times in 2 Posts
sigheat has no particular reputation at present
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

@the clangers, thanks. Guess I'll have to inquire when purchasing the game if it's region locked or not. But thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 27.08.2010, 07:36
NotAllThere's Avatar
Modulo 2
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Baselland
Posts: 15,257
Groaned at 312 Times in 268 Posts
Thanked 23,675 Times in 9,627 Posts
NotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Bringing electronic stuff to Switzerland [from the US]

Quote:
View Post
In regards to the power bar, so if I plug in my us based products into the US power bar/strip with the US power strip having a plug converter, I should be fine as long as all the products I plug in are 120-240?...
But be very careful. Because there is nothing to stop you plugging in a 120V appliance and watching it melt.

I wouldn't do it myself as it gives the appearance of 120V sockets, which really aren't. Where possible, replace the plugs with Swiss ones.
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bringing a UK car to Switzerland missmcp Insurance 21 18.02.2010 14:57
Good prices furniture/electronic stuff for home? hollisterb Daily life 10 04.09.2009 10:40
Chucking stuff (Electronic and bulk waste in Zug) Frizzyfinn Other/general 2 17.07.2009 14:53
Bringing Food into Switzerland... Scoutie Food and drink 11 20.06.2009 23:21


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 15:08.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0