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  #21  
Old 03.07.2012, 16:00
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

I will solve my permit in September, I'm from the Czech republic that belongs to EU-8 as well. I already have job arranged, I have a contract for 3 months with written promise of new contract after this period. I would like to obtain B permit.
I've read it is very difficult to get flat or GA travelcard with L permit - is this true? Maybe I have superfluous worries... But getting of flat is one of the most important issues that I have to do after my arrival to Switzerland...
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Old 03.07.2012, 19:20
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

I already found a lot of information in this thread but, of course, some more arose.

I am arranging my job in Switzerland as well and I am a member of the EU-8.
  • Does anyone know if the L permits are only issued for fixed-term contracts, or also for indefinite ones? (@sashimiso: Maybe you can help here or explain what the practice is at your company. Do you have fixed 1 year contracts and do not even bother to go for the B permits or do you have indefinite contracts and L permits are issued based on that as well)
  • If I do not get a B permit, can I apply for the L permit immediately afterwards or even simultaneously?
  • Is it possible to work for 3 months without the permit? Does this mean that I have to have a fixed 3-month contract? Or can it be an indefinite-term/1-year fixed contract and basically I have 3 months to get the permit under the hood. (Or is it, probably, illegal to work a single day without permit?)
  • My potential workplace is at edge of a canton. If the working position is in one canton, and I want to live in another, where do I apply for the work permit? Or better put, if I get the work permit form a certain canton (where the job post is), can I reside in another canton?
  • Are there any problems obtaining a rental apartment with L permits or do people usually just want to see the income?
My ‘’strategy’’ would be, to suggest to the employer, to try first to go for a B permit with an indefinite contract, and, if unsuccessful, apply for the L permit with a fixed contract for a year and an agreement, that this can be upgraded to a long-term one, when/if the B residency is obtained.

Or would it be easier to just go for the L one, and then in the course of that year do whatever possible to get the B one? Would having an L permit possess an obstacle in every-day life (especially apartment renting)?

I am afraid, that when I sign a new contract and when I quit my current job (2 months’ notice-period), I might be left without any permit when my starting date in the new company should come into effect. Is this a viable fear?

Thank you all!
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  #23  
Old 03.07.2012, 23:34
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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I already found a lot of information in this thread but, of course, some more arose.





I am arranging my job in Switzerland as well and I am a member of the EU-8.
  • Does anyone know if the L permits are only issued for fixed-term contracts, or also for indefinite ones? (@sashimiso: Maybe you can help here or explain what the practice is at your company. Do you have fixed 1 year contracts and do not even bother to go for the B permits or do you have indefinite contracts and L permits are issued based on that as well)
  • If I do not get a B permit, can I apply for the L permit immediately afterwards or even simultaneously?
  • Is it possible to work for 3 months without the permit? Does this mean that I have to have a fixed 3-month contract? Or can it be an indefinite-term/1-year fixed contract and basically I have 3 months to get the permit under the hood. (Or is it, probably, illegal to work a single day without permit?)
  • My potential workplace is at edge of a canton. If the working position is in one canton, and I want to live in another, where do I apply for the work permit? Or better put, if I get the work permit form a certain canton (where the job post is), can I reside in another canton?
  • Are there any problems obtaining a rental apartment with L permits or do people usually just want to see the income?
My ‘’strategy’’ would be, to suggest to the employer, to try first to go for a B permit with an indefinite contract, and, if unsuccessful, apply for the L permit with a fixed contract for a year and an agreement, that this can be upgraded to a long-term one, when/if the B residency is obtained.

Or would it be easier to just go for the L one, and then in the course of that year do whatever possible to get the B one? Would having an L permit possess an obstacle in every-day life (especially apartment renting)?

I am afraid, that when I sign a new contract and when I quit my current job (2 months’ notice-period), I might be left without any permit when my starting date in the new company should come into effect. Is this a viable fear?

Thank you all!
L permit is issued for a contract not-exceeding 12 months while B-permit is issued for a 12 month job contract or longer.
If you don't get a B permit, yes, you can apply for L.
For 3-month contract you will receive L permit.
I would suggest you to start apply for B-permit, ask your commune in Switzerland how many B-permits they still have. If the quota had run out, then you can apply for L-permit but you can reapply for B in the beginning of new trimester.
If you live near the border, you can become a cross-border employee on a G-permit. You need to contact the commune of your employer and to show them a job contract.
You can work and live in different cantons. There is a free movement for members of the EU in Switzerland.

If you have a B-permit and you lose a job, that doesn't affect your stay in Switzerland. Just continue searching for a new job and show your B-permit to your new employer. In case of the EU-members, the B-permit allows for changing jobs and places of residence. Only be careful when considering claiming jobseeker's benefits or social aid: the migration service from your canton may reduce your B-permit from 5 years to shorter therm.

Last edited by Argent; 03.07.2012 at 23:53.
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  #24  
Old 03.07.2012, 23:45
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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I will solve my permit in September, I'm from the Czech republic that belongs to EU-8 as well. I already have job arranged, I have a contract for 3 months with written promise of new contract after this period. I would like to obtain B permit.
I've read it is very difficult to get flat or GA travelcard with L permit - is this true? Maybe I have superfluous worries... But getting of flat is one of the most important issues that I have to do after my arrival to Switzerland...
Yes, you have superfluous worries.
I have already lived in three places in Switzerland and nobody asked me to show my permit. The landlords don't care: as long as you can pay a rent, you are safe.
When I arrived in Switzerland, I asked for GA or 1/2 Fare Travelcard and nobody wanted me to show my permit. I was still living in a hostel and, in the train station at Bern, I was told that I could collect my card from the station. However, when I applied for 1/2 Fare Travelcard in the station in Morges (VD), a gentleman asked me to show my B-permit.
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  #25  
Old 03.07.2012, 23:57
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

Contrary to what Argent posted above, it is illegal to rent an apartment to a person without a valid residence permit. My landlord insisted (and rightfully so) on having a copy of my permit each time it was renewed for his records.
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  #26  
Old 04.07.2012, 00:01
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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Contrary to what Argent posted above, it is illegal to rent an apartment to a person without a valid residence permit. My landlord insisted (and rightfully so) on having a copy of my permit each time it was renewed for his records.
Not technically correct. It's possible for someone who has an 'EU' passport or identity card to organise a lease, and my experience has been that they are told to get a lease organised, plus a job lined up, then take the copy of their contract and their lease to the local Gemeinde to register.

I would expect a prospective landlord to ask for a passport or permit card, but it doesn't have to be a swiss residency permit.
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Old 04.07.2012, 00:55
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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Contrary to what Argent posted above, it is illegal to rent an apartment to a person without a valid residence permit. My landlord insisted (and rightfully so) on having a copy of my permit each time it was renewed for his records.
But where a newly arrived person will receive a residence permit? Firstly they need to find a place to live and then they have to announce themselves in their commune of residence within 8 days and to submit a form for a residence permit, along with job contract or proof of financial resources if they are rich enough.

My story was as follows: I got a job contract and an EU B-permit application form. I went to my commune in Vaud and asked the immigration service if I could use the address of a hotel I stayed in. A gentleman said "yes" and was laughing when was putting the address of the hotel in the form, because the hotel had a funny name. Fortunately he sent my B-permit to my employer, not to the hotel, so the letter wasn't lost at the hotel's reception desk. After, when I found a room to rent in a house, a landlady didin't ask me to show my permit. I only showed my document when I announced myself at the commune of my residence. They only asked my adress and landlady's name and didin't require a contract from her.
In Switzerland the cantons and the communes are allowed to interpret the Swiss federal law. So, your chances of settle in without hassle depend of the flexibility of the local authorities.

Last edited by Argent; 04.07.2012 at 01:19.
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Old 04.07.2012, 01:18
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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In Switzerland the cantons and the communes are allowed to interpret the Swiss federal law. .
Source, evidence, jurisprudence?
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  #29  
Old 04.07.2012, 01:34
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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Source, evidence, jurisprudence?
Cantons:
Les cantons ont leur propre Constitution, leurs propres gouvernements et parlements, leurs propres tribunaux et leur propres lois, qui doivent être compatibles avec celles de la Confédération. Ils ont une grande autonomie administrative et un pouvoir de décision important. Par exemple, chaque canton détermine lui-même les taux d’imposition, dispose d’une police, dispense des prestations sociales et gère son système d’éducation.

Communes:
Les communes forment le troisième niveau politique.
A l’intérieur des cantons, elles ont aussi une certaine autonomie et leurs propres autorités.
De plus, ce sont les communes qui sont responsables des droits civiques. Les Suisses sont tous citoyen d’une commune – et l’appartenance à un canton et à la Confédération découle de ce droit. Les naturalisations s’effectuent également au niveau communal.

Selon les cantons, les communes peuvent avoir une grande autonomie et peuvent prendre des décisions dans des domaines comme la sécurité, l’éducation, la santé et les transports. Elle peuvent fixer le prix de l’énergie. Elles ont aussi souvent pour tâche d’encaisser les impôts fédéraux, cantonaux et communaux.

Source: swissinfo.ch
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  #30  
Old 04.07.2012, 09:31
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

Thank you for this info! I will be living at my brother for beginning so I will have time to search my own flat. Your experience with permit helped me to take it easy

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Yes, you have superfluous worries.
I have already lived in three places in Switzerland and nobody asked me to show my permit. The landlords don't care: as long as you can pay a rent, you are safe.
When I arrived in Switzerland, I asked for GA or 1/2 Fare Travelcard and nobody wanted me to show my permit. I was still living in a hostel and, in the train station at Bern, I was told that I could collect my card from the station. However, when I applied for 1/2 Fare Travelcard in the station in Morges (VD), a gentleman asked me to show my B-permit.
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  #31  
Old 04.07.2012, 10:09
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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Not technically correct. It's possible for someone who has an 'EU' passport or identity card to organise a lease, and my experience has been that they are told to get a lease organised, plus a job lined up, then take the copy of their contract and their lease to the local Gemeinde to register.

I would expect a prospective landlord to ask for a passport or permit card, but it doesn't have to be a swiss residency permit.
You are probably right. I was thinking of a long-term lease when I wrote the post (and from the prospective of a non-EU passport holder).

To Argent: I was posting about renting an apartment, not staying in a hotel. I, too, stayed in a hotel (for months) when I first came to Zurich. No docs were needed to rent a room for the first month.
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  #32  
Old 04.07.2012, 10:21
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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In my experience, we have very little trouble taking candidates from the EU or even UK because they don't have any paperwork issues - getting a work permit is easy.
The UK is in the EU (at least for the time being ).
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  #33  
Old 04.07.2012, 11:40
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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You are probably right. I was thinking of a long-term lease when I wrote the post (and from the prospective of a non-EU passport holder).

To Argent: I was posting about renting an apartment, not staying in a hotel. I, too, stayed in a hotel (for months) when I first came to Zurich. No docs were needed to rent a room for the first month.
I also wrote about living in a house, with a landlady. She didin't require me to show my permit. She didin't give me a contract either but the commune didin't demand that (this is a small village). Private landlords may be more flexible.

In case of apartments, I agree with you. I have no experience in living in an apartment in Switzerland but a year ago I went to see one in Nyon. A lady, who was rather a property manageress, required a 3 month deposit and a long term stay, minimum 2 years! Had I decided to stay there, she would probably ask me for a permit.
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  #34  
Old 04.07.2012, 13:20
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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I also wrote about living in a house, with a landlady. She didin't require me to show my permit. She didin't give me a contract either but the commune didin't demand that (this is a small village). Private landlords may be more flexible.

In case of apartments, I agree with you. I have no experience in living in an apartment in Switzerland but a year ago I went to see one in Nyon. A lady, who was rather a property manageress, required a 3 month deposit and a long term stay, minimum 2 years! Had I decided to stay there, she would probably ask me for a permit.
She didn't "require you to show her your permit" because as you said above, you had already provide her with the paper from that commune that you had registered.

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After, when I found a room to rent in a house, a landlady didin't ask me to show my permit. I only showed my document when I announced myself at the commune of my residence.
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Old 04.07.2012, 21:27
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Re: Immigration quota - eastern EU

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She didn't "require you to show her your permit" because as you said above, you had already provide her with the paper from that commune that you had registered.
I moved in that lady's house first and then, within 8 days, I announced my arrival in the local commune. I am sorry if I didin't write it clearly.
I don't know why they didin't require me to show a tenancy agreement. On contrary, it is required in Lausanne: they have special forms which your landlord has to sign.

When I arrived in Valais, I settled in a beautiful small village I live in, like the previous one in Vaud. I thought that would be pretty easy to get the formalities sorted. But an employee of my commune asked me to bring a tenancy agreement from my new landlady, although they know my landlady in person. Few foreigners had lived in my house before and they weren't required to bring an agreement, when they announced their arrival in the commune.

Last edited by Argent; 04.07.2012 at 21:47.
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