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  #381  
Old 19.08.2013, 09:54
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Hi All,
I am about to send out my application for the embassy. However, my german knowledge is not all that great. I do understand 80% of pretty much most conversations but can't speak it any more.
Does any one has a list of question and answers in german that can share with me. Or maybe a website that can help me quickly prepare for the interview with some sample question and answers.
Thanks
Sorri
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  #382  
Old 19.08.2013, 10:10
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Don't you need to prove you can speak the language? Tina Turner did recently I believe when she applied for citizenship.

You give your location as Zurich, but you're sending the docs to an embassy which sounds like you're applying from abroad. What's your background for naturalisation? Do you have close ties to the country?
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  #383  
Old 19.08.2013, 15:53
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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...Does any one has a list of question and answers in german that can share with me. Or maybe a website that can help me quickly prepare for the interview with some sample question and answers.
There are no standard questions or answers. The language part of the interview depends very much on the interviewer. It can last anywhere from almost nothing (as in my case) to several minutes. The interviewer just has to be satisfied that you understand the language enough to be satisfactory, and that can be a bit subjective.

I recommend just brushing up on your language skills and do your best chatting small talk when that part of the interview comes.

EDIT: Here's an idea... What you could memorize would be a narrative of the history of your German language skills, even including how much you've forgotten. If you're able to rattle off several sentences along that line, it could be a good first impression, even if your responses to subsequent questions aren't stellar.

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Don't you need to prove you can speak the language?...
You don't have to prove anything near fluency. Again, it's a bit subjective, but the key is showing a measure of language skills, not mastery.
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  #384  
Old 28.08.2013, 10:23
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Hi All,
I am about to send out my application for the embassy. However, my german knowledge is not all that great. I do understand 80% of pretty much most conversations but can't speak it any more.
Does any one has a list of question and answers in german that can share with me. Or maybe a website that can help me quickly prepare for the interview with some sample question and answers.
Thanks
Sorri
Canton Aargau has a website to help naturalization candidates test their German language comprehension and knowledge of Switzerland:

http://www.einbuergerungstest-aargau.ch/
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  #385  
Old 14.09.2013, 02:09
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

This is my first post, and I appreciate everything that has been posted on this forum. I apologize in advance for how long my post is.

My maternal grandparents are both Swiss, as is my mother and most of my siblings (but not my father). I was born in 1982 in the United States. From what I understand, at the time of my birth Swiss women married to a foreigner could not automatically pass on Swiss citizenship to her children. When that law was changed in 1985, she assumed we would all become naturalized. She found out later that there was a “grace” period of when I could have been naturalized. That window closed. She attempted to have me naturalized later but was unsuccessful. My other siblings became Swiss because they were born after the law change.

I’m 31 now and I figured my opportunity to become Swiss was over. However, I became aware that I could apply for facilitated naturalization and am currently completing the application.

My wish to become naturalized is mainly to share the Swiss heritage with my family.

Here are my questions:
1) I speak Italian, but little German. When interviewing, would this be seen as a concern? Should I attempt to learn more German, or is acceptable to converse mainly in Italian?
2) I have only been to Switzerland once, although I have some friends in Switzerland that are willing to be references for me. I am planning on visiting Switzerland again next year. Does anyone know if only being to the country once would prevent my application from being approved?

Thank you for any insight you all might have.
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  #386  
Old 14.09.2013, 05:37
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Hello cgr.

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1) I speak Italian, but little German. When interviewing, would this be seen as a concern? Should I attempt to learn more German, or is acceptable to converse mainly in Italian?
Italian, being one of Switzerland's official languages, is fine. The forms should, therefore, be filled in the Italian language.

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2) I have only been to Switzerland once, although I have some friends in Switzerland that are willing to be references for me. I am planning on visiting Switzerland again next year. Does anyone know if only being to the country once would prevent my application from being approved?
This will be more of a problem. They usually ask for three visits in the last ten years. You should consider making a couple of trips to the old country, if at all possible.

Remember that you should also have good enough knowledge of geography, history and current political events in Switzerland. This is usually assessed during the interview at the Embassy (which will have a short section in the Swiss official language, Italian in your case).

Please keep us updated. Good luck and best regards.
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  #387  
Old 14.09.2013, 11:38
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Hello cgr.



Italian, being one of Switzerland's official languages, is fine. The forms should, therefore, be filled in the Italian language.



This will be more of a problem. They usually ask for three visits in the last ten years. You should consider making a couple of trips to the old country, if at all possible.

Remember that you should also have good enough knowledge of geography, history and current political events in Switzerland. This is usually assessed during the interview at the Embassy (which will have a short section in the Swiss official language, Italian in your case).

Please keep us updated. Good luck and best regards.
It also depends on how they define close ties to the country. Do you have any other relatives who are still in Switzerland and do you contact them often?
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  #388  
Old 14.09.2013, 23:22
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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It also depends on how they define close ties to the country. Do you have any other relatives who are still in Switzerland and do you contact them often?

My great-grandfather emigrated from Switzerland with his family to Brazil. He married a Swiss woman and stayed in Brazil while the rest of his family returned to Switzerland. My grandfather is Swiss but grew up in Brazil. We lost contact with our relatives who returned to Switzerland. I'm trying my best to find them, but it is difficult after so many years.

So I do have distant relatives in Switzerland - but no, I have not been able to contact them....

I imagine my application would be considered "a long shot" ?? I will do it even if there is only a small chance. But if you believe I do not have a chance, I may have to re-think this.

Thank you
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  #389  
Old 15.09.2013, 07:50
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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My great-grandfather emigrated from Switzerland with his family to Brazil. He married a Swiss woman and stayed in Brazil while the rest of his family returned to Switzerland. My grandfather is Swiss but grew up in Brazil. We lost contact with our relatives who returned to Switzerland. I'm trying my best to find them, but it is difficult after so many years.

So I do have distant relatives in Switzerland - but no, I have not been able to contact them....

I imagine my application would be considered "a long shot" ??...
I woud definitely do at least three things:

1) Ask at the Swiss embassy or consulate. Tell them your story, and ask their opinion whether you qualify for applying or not.

2) Your chances of qualifying and success would be greatly increased by your finding and making solid contact with (i.e., personally meeting) your Swiss relatives. That would give you some of the unequivocal 'connections' that are one of the qualifying conditions.

3) Depending on how much you already know/don't know, start studying Switzerland's history, culture, geography, politics, etc. Make it your hobby. If you want citizenship, prove it to yourself by your zeal for your homeland-to-be.
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  #390  
Old 15.09.2013, 09:17
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Here's the outline of what's needed:

http://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/bfm/...uergerung.html

Integration may be a problematic area too.

As Texaner suggests, I'd contact your nearest Swiss Embassy and see what they have to say.

I also have to ask how you see yourself benefitting from Swiss nationality? Okay, it'll make you "Swiss" like the rest of your family, but are you thinking of moving here and making it your permanent home? If so, then be aware that the US's FATCA law is making it extremely hard for Americans to hold a bank account here. As a US citizen you are required to file US tax returns no matter where you live in the world and you may have to pay them tax too. Should you want to open a bank account here you will have to allow the bank to pass your account details on to the IRS or you won't get an account.
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Old 15.09.2013, 09:29
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Here's the outline of what's needed:

http://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/bfm/...uergerung.html

Integration may be a problematic area too.

As Texaner suggests, I'd contact your nearest Swiss Embassy and see what they have to say.

I also have to ask how you see yourself benefitting from Swiss nationality? Okay, it'll make you "Swiss" like the rest of your family, but are you thinking of moving here and making it your permanent home? If so, then be aware that the US's FATCA law is making it extremely hard for Americans to hold a bank account here. As a US citizen you are required to file US tax returns no matter where you live in the world and you may have to pay them tax too. Should you want to open a bank account here you will have to allow the bank to pass your account details on to the IRS or you won't get an account.
Thank you for your information. I contacted the embassy and they simply told me to complete the application and they will review it. They said they will look at the "whole package".

As I've gotten older, family history has become very important to me. I am pursuing citizenship mainly to have a connection to Switzerland, like the rest of my family does. I would also like to be able pass it on to my children. I don't currently have plans on living in the country, although I may in the future. I am aware of the difficulties FATCA presents...it would certainly make life more difficult.

I am hoping that the Swiss authorities will take into consideration that my grandparents, mother, and siblings are all Swiss, and that I should have been as well if my mother had been aware of the law change in time. I know that is not a good excuse, but I hope it counts for something. If they do not see this as bolstering my "close connection" to Switzerland, then my application may be weak since I haven't yet made contact with my relatives in the country and have only visited once.

Thanks again to everyone that has given me advice and input.
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  #392  
Old 16.09.2013, 15:04
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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My great-grandfather emigrated from Switzerland with his family to Brazil. He married a Swiss woman and stayed in Brazil while the rest of his family returned to Switzerland. My grandfather is Swiss but grew up in Brazil. We lost contact with our relatives who returned to Switzerland. I'm trying my best to find them, but it is difficult after so many years.

So I do have distant relatives in Switzerland - but no, I have not been able to contact them....
You should at least have enough data about your great-grandfather for the Swiss authorities to be able to track him: canton, gemeinde, date of birth, etc. Just clarifying this, as it will be impossible to get the ball rolling without this information.

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I imagine my application would be considered "a long shot" ?? I will do it even if there is only a small chance. But if you believe I do not have a chance, I may have to re-think this.
Your case sounds pretty similar to mine... Great-grandfather born in Switzerland, no known living relatives there, etc. In my experience, there are no long shots in this thing... Keep up the good spirits!
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  #393  
Old 17.09.2013, 23:22
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Hello everyone.

The consulate told me that this is how they determine"close ties"

1) Frequent trips to Switzerland (at least 3 trips within the last 10 years)

2) Knowledge of a Swiss language

3) Knowledge about Switzerland (politics, history, geography, recent events etc.)

4) Contact with Swiss citizen in Switzerland (letters of recommendation)

5) Contact to Swiss citizen living abroad (letters of recommendation)

6) Participation / membership in a Swiss club or Swiss events abroad

7) Working for a Swiss company or organization

"You do not have to fulfill all the requirements, the judgment of your possible close ties are based on the entirety of the above mentioned points. The most important points are frequent trips to Switzerland,knowledge of a Swiss language, contact with Swiss organizations/ citizen abroad and Swiss citizens in Switzerland. “

So this is what I have:

1) One visit to Switzerland (although I am planning on going again in April)

2) Good enough Italian to hopefully be ranked “medium”

3) Studying Swiss politics, history, etc. every day to be really prepared

4) 3-4 contacts in Switzerland (with letters)

5) 2-3 good contacts of Swiss living abroad (with letters)

6) I live in Alaska - no Swiss clubs that I can find. So I’ve joined online Swiss organizations like SwissCommunity.org.

7) Do not work for Swiss company

Out of this list, I see that my visits to Switzerland would hurt my chances. I will visit Switzerland in April 2014. I will certainly visit again, but not until late 2015 or early 2016. I suppose I could wait until after 3 trips to submit my application, but it may be in a couple of years. Or I could submit it with two visits and explain I am planning another trip and see where that gets me.
As I mentioned before, my mother and grandfather are Swiss citizens (they have passports) as well as my siblings. Hopefully that would tilt the balance in my favor just a little.
Anyway, I hope the criteria listed above will be helpful for others interested in the facilitated naturalization requirements for those living abroad.
Any additional advice or insight about my situation would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks again,
Chris
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Old 22.09.2013, 05:57
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Greetings,
Please forgive my ignorance, but does anyone know if the discussion about amending the naturalization process (see http://www.tagesanzeiger.ch/schweiz/...story/19943692) would affect my application for facilitated naturalization as described in the following law:

“Child born before 1 July 1985 whose mother is Swiss (Article 58a)
Article 58a states:
"A child with foreign nationality who was born before 1 July 1985, and whose mother was a Swiss citizen before or at the time of the birth, can submit an application for simplified naturalisation if he/she has close connections with Switzerland".

Thank you and best regards
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  #395  
Old 23.09.2013, 10:37
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

The way I read that article, and others like it, is that they were discussing the traditional route to citizenship, the one based on residence, and not simplified applications like those based on family heritage.
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  #396  
Old 23.09.2013, 13:52
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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...I suppose I could wait until after 3 trips to submit my application, but it may be in a couple of years. Or I could submit it with two visits...
You might get by with two visits, especially if you 'make up for it' by excelling in one or more other categories. (I only had 2 trips in the past 10 years, but there were other trips older than 10 years.)

For whatever it's worth, another thing that might help, even though it's not on the list (sort of thinking outside the box), would be to bring along family photos, mementos, souvenirs from Swiss heritage, visits, etc., and when discussing your connections, pull that stuff out show-and-tell style and discuss it with enthusiasm and respect, showing how much you treasure the connections you do have.
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Old 11.10.2013, 17:40
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Hi everyone, I am from Vietnam and this is my fourth year being in Switzerland. I had been here since I was 14, I went to a boarding school in St.Gallen. I read the comments in this forum and I found people here have such a deep knowledge about Swiss immigration law, thus can I have some help form you. I am only 17 now and I am thinking to apply for Swiss naturalization. I feel like a part of this country. I grew up mentally here. I can speak English and German. But next year I probably attend an university in French part of Switzerland. It is really obscured for me, I don't know about the swiss naturalization law in Geneva may be. I lived in St.Gallen for almost 4 years and I know only a bit of French.
What should I do?
Should I apply for Swiss citizenship in St.Gallen or in Geneva when I ll be 20?
How hard is the regular naturalization process for young people who are under 20?
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  #398  
Old 11.10.2013, 18:51
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Hi everyone, I am from Vietnam and this is my fourth year being in Switzerland. I had been here since I was 14, I went to a boarding school in St.Gallen. I read the comments in this forum and I found people here have such a deep knowledge about Swiss immigration law, thus can I have some help form you. I am only 17 now and I am thinking to apply for Swiss naturalization. I feel like a part of this country. I grew up mentally here. I can speak English and German. But next year I probably attend an university in French part of Switzerland. It is really obscured for me, I don't know about the swiss naturalization law in Geneva may be. I lived in St.Gallen for almost 4 years and I know only a bit of French.
What should I do?
Should I apply for Swiss citizenship in St.Gallen or in Geneva when I ll be 20?
How hard is the regular naturalization process for young people who are under 20?
Not sure if you'll be able to do it at 20 as you need 10 years for regular naturalisation and you don't qualify for the facilitated process. Here's what the official BFM website says:

https://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/bfm...uergerung.html

I would say do it in St. Gallen as I assume you will have closer ties (family, friends, etc) there than in Geneva. Obviously, work on language skills, learn the history of Switzerland and your canton, join in local groups and activities in your gemeinde to show your a part of the community.
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Old 04.12.2013, 19:35
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

I am going to my local police station for my interview on Monday!!! I guess I need to brush up on my history. Has anyone recently had an interview for facilitated naturalisation in Lausanne?
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Old 05.12.2013, 18:55
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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I am going to my local police station for my interview on Monday!!! I guess I need to brush up on my history. Has anyone recently had an interview for facilitated naturalisation in Lausanne?
For facilitated naturalization you shouldn't have questions on history or culture.
Is that new?
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