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  #421  
Old 14.11.2014, 13:22
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Hi everyone,

I am a French citizen and my great grandfather was Swiss.
Some years ago i contacted the Federal Office of migration in Bern and they told me I could ask for facilitated naturalization based on article 58a of the nationality law. I was pretty busy with my studies but still wanted to do it anytime soon and as I just got offered a job in Geneva I want to complete this process now. So for the whole part the process will be fine for me but i have a problem with the main Swiss birth certificate.

My great grandfather was born in France from a Swiss father born in Kanton Basel Landschaft. The problem I have now is that I would like to find this Swiss birth certificate but the birth date is 1860, a time at which birth records where held by churches when baptisms of newborns occured.
Somebody in my family made some research and it seems that my ancestor was an unwanted child from a single mother and thus it is possible that he was not baptised because it was a shameful situation.

I have many documents from France though, saying that my great grandfather was Swiss. He was born in 1891 and living for most of his life in the Alsace area which became German from 1870 to 1918 and he was never sure if France considered him only Swiss, or German or French util a court order of 1957 declared him also French.

I didn't find any Swiss passport or birth certificate yet but i have the following documents: a French birth certificate where it is written that his father was Swiss and born in Basel Kanton in 1860, a French court order of 1957 saying that even if my grandfather was Swiss he was also French, a letter from french authorities from 1947 discussing if he was Swiss only or also French, a French residency card mentioning that my great grandfather was Swiss. For now I have only one Swiss document, a 1917 letter from the Swiss embassy in Berlin acknowledging that his Swiss passport was sent.

Do you think these documents will be enough to prove that my great grandfather was Swiss and his father was born in Switzerland ?
I presume that your great-grandfather was the father of one of your grandmothers (rather than one of your grandfathers), as Art 58a provides for the facilitated naturalization of the non-Swiss children of Swiss mothers (and is extended, in its third paragraph, to apply to the grandchildren of Swiss grandmothers) who were born before 1985 and who have close ties to Switzerland.

The key thing, then, would be to establish whether your grandmother was Swiss at or before the time of your parent's birth. If you don't think it's likely that your great-grandfather registered your grandmother with the Swiss authorities (or if you don't have any evidence that he did), then presumably it would still be sufficient in order to establish that you meet the eligibility criteria through your grandmother if it can be shown that your great-grandfather was Swiss at the time she was born. I'm guessing here, but it sounds like the documents you have ought to be just about sufficient for this purpose. In any case, it's certainly worthwhile to get as complete an application together as you can, and then if there are any documentation issues that need to be addressed, they can hopefully be worked through over the course of the processing of the application.

I would just note a few more things: First, curiously, the checklist of documents to be submitted with an Art 58a application includes the applicant's own birth certificate but not those of the mother or grandmother on whom the application is based. This may be oversight or it may be based on the assumption that, in straightforward cases, the Swiss authorities would relatively easily be able to establish from their records that the mother or grandmother was Swiss, so I'm not sure what would happen in situations in which incomplete documentation leaves any questions about eligibility, but presumably all available information would be examined and taken into account ...

Secondly, note that while the Swiss government's administrative handbook on citizenship states that a grandchild eligible to apply for facilitated naturalization under Art 58a can do so even if his parent (the Swiss grandmother's son or daughter) has not, those applications will be scrutinized more carefully for evidence of the required close ties to Switzerland. (See p. 54 in this document [this is the Italian version, but the French text must be online, too]: https://www.bfm.admin.ch//content/da...ueg-kap2-i.pdf)

Finally, if you're going to do this, I would pursue the matter as quickly as possible, as the new 2014 citizenship law does not include the provision allowing the non-Swiss grandchildren of Swiss grandmothers to have access to facilitated naturalisation. A date for that law to go into force has not been fixed by the Federal Council, but it will presumably be within the next year or so. (A post elsewhere suggested it would be by 2016, at the latest, after cantonal citizenship laws are harmonized with the new federal law.)
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  #422  
Old 14.11.2014, 14:07
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Honestly, I'm not sure that it is enough to have a great-grandfather as a Swiss and to apply for citizenship so late. How old are you?

I just know with my MIL, her grandparents were Swiss and so were her parents, although I'm not sure if her parents claimed their citizenship. MIL and one sister both applied for Swiss citizenship before it was too late, but they had 7 other siblings who were too old and had passed the deadline for applying in time. None of that part of the family is Swiss now.
It is enough, i had to give all my direct ancestry until my Swiss ancestor and the Bern office of migrations told me i could applied for facilitated naturalization based on article 58a alinea 3 of the Swiss nationality law.

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The Swiss authorities will likely want to see official Swiss records, if at all possible. These should exist and be accessible from whichever office (Zivilstandamt in German, sorry I don't know the French equivalent) maintains family records wherever the person was born (Gemeinde or Bezirk in German).

Knowing the date and location where the person was born, you can contact the authorities in that location, and they will be able to direct you to the correct office for requesting the appropriate documents. You'll have to give that office the name and birthdate and ask them to verify that they have the person's birth recorded. Then you will have to order official verification from them in the form of a Familienschein, Familienausweis or Heimatschein (again, German obviously), which they will print, stamp as certified and send you for a fee.

These documents can then be supplied to whichever Swiss authorities with whom you are starting the facilitated naturalization process.

Two things, however:
  • I'm not 100% familiar with your background story, so it's not fully clear to me that you still qualify, but the Swiss authorities responsible for this process for applicants where you live (the Swiss embassy?) will be able to tell you after discussing it with you.

  • The process takes several months (i.e., well over a year usually) to run its course. It isn't clear whether you expect it to happen quickly, or whether the job offer is contingent on your being (or becoming) Swiss, but as far as I know, there's no such thing as fast track facilitated naturalization.
Thank you this is very helpful, I was thinking that such records exists somewhere but didn't know where to look for precisely, I have precise informations to give them. I will try to contact these authorities.
I know for sure that my great grandfather had many times contacts with Switzerland. For instance my grandmother told me that her family was offered to be repatriated to Switzerland shortly before World War two but that her father declined because they had just bought a house in Alsace.

As I mentioned above, I do qualify for facilitated naturalization. The office of migration in Bern explained me that my grandmother lost her Swiss citizenship when she married my French grandfather. As such my mother is entitled to obtain facilitated naturalization with alinea 2 of article 58a and I can do the same based on alinea 3.

I am a French citizen which is in the Schengen area so there is no problem for me to get a job in Switzerland as French citizens have the right to work in Switzerland. I was told by the embassy about the lenght of the process. My motivation is not so related with my job, i would rather compare it to a third generation Irish American wishing to obtain also Irish citizenship, I don't know how to explain this better.

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I presume that your great-grandfather was the father of one of your grandmothers (rather than one of your grandfathers), as Art 58a provides for the facilitated naturalization of the non-Swiss children of Swiss mothers (and is extended, in its third paragraph, to apply to the grandchildren of Swiss grandmothers) who were born before 1985 and who have close ties to Switzerland.

The key thing, then, would be to establish whether your grandmother was Swiss at or before the time of your parent's birth. If you don't think it's likely that your great-grandfather registered your grandmother with the Swiss authorities (or if you don't have any evidence that he did), then presumably it would still be sufficient in order to establish that you meet the eligibility criteria through your grandmother if it can be shown that your great-grandfather was Swiss at the time she was born. I'm guessing here, but it sounds like the documents you have ought to be just about sufficient for this purpose. In any case, it's certainly worthwhile to get as complete an application together as you can, and then if there are any documentation issues that need to be addressed, they can hopefully be worked through over the course of the processing of the application.

I would just note a few more things: First, curiously, the checklist of documents to be submitted with an Art 58a application includes the applicant's own birth certificate but not those of the mother or grandmother on whom the application is based. This may be oversight or it may be based on the assumption that, in straightforward cases, the Swiss authorities would relatively easily be able to establish from their records that the mother or grandmother was Swiss, so I'm not sure what would happen in situations in which incomplete documentation leaves any questions about eligibility, but presumably all available information would be examined and taken into account ...

Secondly, note that while the Swiss government's administrative handbook on citizenship states that a grandchild eligible to apply for facilitated naturalization under Art 58a can do so even if his parent (the Swiss grandmother's son or daughter) has not, those applications will be scrutinized more carefully for evidence of the required close ties to Switzerland. (See p. 54 in this document [this is the Italian version, but the French text must be online, too]: https://www.bfm.admin.ch//content/da...ueg-kap2-i.pdf)

Finally, if you're going to do this, I would pursue the matter as quickly as possible, as the new 2014 citizenship law does not include the provision allowing the non-Swiss grandchildren of Swiss grandmothers to have access to facilitated naturalisation. A date for that law to go into force has not been fixed by the Federal Council, but it will presumably be within the next year or so. (A post elsewhere suggested it would be by 2016, at the latest, after cantonal citizenship laws are harmonized with the new federal law.)
Basically my situation is that my grandmother was still Swiss at birth, according to the Swiss authorities i had contacted some years ago. But my grandmother did not know that or did everything to forget it when she moved to Paris after the war, as she was in the situation of a non French speaking immigrant from a german speaking area wishing to integrate French society just after German occupation of France.

There is no problem to find these French records as they are very well maintained by French authorities, but my problem was mainly to prove that the father of my great grandfather was born in Switzerland. But if has the previous poster said, Switzerland can find tracks of my great grandfather citizenship in its records then it will be perfect.
I knew about these close ties, but as I will work in Geneve and have many swiss friends and a cousin I think it could be fine, wouldn't it ? For now I am just trying to get all documents together to start this process anyways.

Thank you for these details on the nationality law changes, I was wondering if they intended to change this. I really woke up at the right moment !
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  #423  
Old 14.11.2014, 14:09
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

I would assume that the close ties might be the more difficult thing to prove. Do you visit relatives here or even have any that you know of? Have you visited the place where your ancestor was born, etc? Just being of Swiss descent isn't always enough to grant Swiss nationality.
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  #424  
Old 14.11.2014, 14:25
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Well good luck to you then! You may find that sometimes one immigration officer will say no and another will say yes. They do not all have the same ideas about how it works, especially if there is something subjective like "close ties to Switzerland" or working with incomplete birth records.

I am a little confused though, you said your grandmother was Swiss before her marriage to a French man. Do you mean she could have qualified to be Swiss? Otherwise, isn't her birth certificate enough? Or do you want to have the great grandfather and great great grandfather's birth records to prove that your ancestors were really born in Switzerland instead of France as your grandmother?

Would be cool if you could make it work. My father was in a sort of similar position with the Irish citizenship and he never pursued it and now I think it's far too far away in generations for me to be eligible. Would have made living in the EU a lot easier for me though!
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  #425  
Old 14.11.2014, 14:50
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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I would assume that the close ties might be the more difficult thing to prove. Do you visit relatives here or even have any that you know of? Have you visited the place where your ancestor was born, etc? Just being of Swiss descent isn't always enough to grant Swiss nationality.
I did visit Switzerland many times. I was in France so it was not far away. I visited this village yes, I went to see family graves. I even lost myself on the Gorner glacier. It is very possible that i will live in Switzerland from the next months on. I read someone on the forum say that it will be easy to show close ties if it is the case. I might want to ask a lawyer what are my chances anyways.

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Well good luck to you then! You may find that sometimes one immigration officer will say no and another will say yes. They do not all have the same ideas about how it works, especially if there is something subjective like "close ties to Switzerland" or working with incomplete birth records.

I am a little confused though, you said your grandmother was Swiss before her marriage to a French man. Do you mean she could have qualified to be Swiss? Otherwise, isn't her birth certificate enough? Or do you want to have the great grandfather and great great grandfather's birth records to prove that your ancestors were really born in Switzerland instead of France as your grandmother?

Would be cool if you could make it work. My father was in a sort of similar position with the Irish citizenship and he never pursued it and now I think it's far too far away in generations for me to be eligible. Would have made living in the EU a lot easier for me though!
Thank you ! I had a bit of that already, I first contacted the Swiss embassy in Paris and I was told I could not, then I sent an email to the office of migration in Bern who told me there was no problem, so this is why now i want to insist when somebody says no.
You are right, I heard that some green party political guy in Geneva raised this issue about the "close ties with Switzerland" being imprecise and arbitrary. I have to agree that for applicants these "close ties" brings a bit confusion.

My grandmother was born Swiss as they told me and she lost her citizenship when she married my grandfather but she didn't think at all about Switzerland, I am still wondering if she was hiding this or if it didn't come to her mind at all that she was born Swiss as the office of migration told me. It is very delicate to talk about this subject with her. She kept this like a family secret. It is unclear what Swiss documents my family still has. I am trying to gather the most i can find.
But my family lived in this complicated area which was disputed between France and Germany, they speak a close dialect to Basel german. So she was born in France, she became German during the second world war and became French again after. Moved to Paris and tried to integrate and be a better French than common French. So I am trying to reconnect this broken link.


Even if it is a long shot you might still contact Irish authorities and ask. I was thinking the same but still had the curiosity to ask and they gave me the green light so you have nothing to lose
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  #426  
Old 14.11.2014, 15:08
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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I did visit Switzerland many times. I was in France so it was not far away. I visited this village yes, I went to see family graves. I even lost myself on the Gorner glacier. It is very possible that i will live in Switzerland from the next months on. I read someone on the forum say that it will be easy to show close ties if it is the case. I might want to ask a lawyer what are my chances anyways.



Thank you ! I had a bit of that already, I first contacted the Swiss embassy in Paris and I was told I could not, then I sent an email to the office of migration in Bern who told me there was no problem, so this is why now i want to insist when somebody says no.
You are right, I heard that some green party political guy in Geneva raised this issue about the "close ties with Switzerland" being imprecise and arbitrary. I have to agree that for applicants these "close ties" brings a bit confusion.

My grandmother was born Swiss as they told me and she lost her citizenship when she married my grandfather but she didn't think at all about Switzerland, I am still wondering if she was hiding this or if it didn't come to her mind at all that she was born Swiss as the office of migration told me. It is very delicate to talk about this subject with her. She kept this like a family secret. It is unclear what Swiss documents my family still has. I am trying to gather the most i can find.
But my family lived in this complicated area which was disputed between France and Germany, they speak a close dialect to Basel german. So she was born in France, she became German during the second world war and became French again after. Moved to Paris and tried to integrate and be a better French than common French. So I am trying to reconnect this broken link.


Even if it is a long shot you might still contact Irish authorities and ask. I was thinking the same but still had the curiosity to ask and they gave me the green light so you have nothing to lose
If I were you, I wouldn't bother with the expense of a lawyer, as the information on how the Swiss authorities interpret the meaning of "close ties" is readily available. Yes, it's an imprecise concept, but they have a fairly well defined way of assessing it. As discussed elsewhere in this forum, they generally look for regular trips to Switzerland (covered if you live there and particularly if you have travelled there over the years and visited your ancestral place of origin), relationships with Swiss friends and family members who can provide a reference and verify that you have visited, involvement in Swiss clubs/organizations abroad (presumably less relevant if you're living in Switzerland), and knowledge of a Swiss language/dialect. If you can document all of those things pretty well, I think your application would be considered pretty strong.

For the official discussion of how "close ties" are assessed, see section 4.7.2.4 in this chapter of the administrative manual on citizenship:
https://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/dam...ueg-kap4-i.pdf.

Good luck!
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Old 14.11.2014, 15:24
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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If I were you, I wouldn't bother with the expense of a lawyer, as the information on how the Swiss authorities interpret the meaning of "close ties" is readily available. Yes, it's an imprecise concept, but they have a fairly well defined way of assessing it. As discussed elsewhere in this forum, they generally look for regular trips to Switzerland (covered if you live there and particularly if you have travelled there over the years and visited your ancestral place of origin), relationships with Swiss friends and family members who can provide a reference and verify that you have visited, involvement in Swiss clubs/organizations abroad (presumably less relevant if you're living in Switzerland), and knowledge of a Swiss language/dialect. If you can document all of those things pretty well, I think your application would be considered pretty strong.

For the official discussion of how "close ties" are assessed, see section 4.7.2.4 in this chapter of the administrative manual on citizenship:
https://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/dam...ueg-kap4-i.pdf.

Good luck!
I was just reading this document you provided and it is said that all these "close ties" conditions will not matter if the applicant will live in Switzerland, because he will have "simple ties" and should basically just behave like a good normal citizen.
For future readers, French version is here: https://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/dam...ueg-kap4-f.pdf

I am a native French speaker and I speak good German so I don't worry so much as I read from people here that language is the most difficult part in these interviews.

Thank you, I will bring back victory !
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Old 14.11.2014, 15:43
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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I was just reading this document you provided and it is said that all these "close ties" conditions will not matter if the applicant will live in Switzerland, because he will have "simple ties" and should basically just behave like a good normal citizen.
For future readers, French version is here: https://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/dam...ueg-kap4-f.pdf

I am a native French speaker and I speak good German so I don't worry so much as I read from people here that language is the most difficult part in these interviews.

Thank you, I will bring back victory !
Perhaps you have found a passage in the manual that I have missed, but I'm not sure you are reading that quite right. The section on "simple ties" (4.7.2.3) refers to a less stringent standard that is applied when assessing applications for "reintegration" (for former Swiss citizens) rather than the higher "close ties" standard that is applied to many categories of application for facilitated naturalization. In any case, living in Switzerland arguably gives one quite "close ties" to the country and certainly makes it quite easy to meet most of the specific expectations laid out in the manual.

And yes, I'm sure you will have no trouble at all in terms of demonstrating language abilities. There is also an expectation that you be well informed on Swiss history, politics, and geography, which might or might not be tested as part of the process.

Again, good luck, and keep us posted.
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Old 14.11.2014, 16:10
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Perhaps you have found a passage in the manual that I have missed, but I'm not sure you are reading that quite right. The section on "simple ties" (4.7.2.3) refers to a less stringent standard that is applied when assessing applications for "reintegration" (for former Swiss citizens) rather than the higher "close ties" standard that is applied to many categories of application for facilitated naturalization. In any case, living in Switzerland arguably gives one quite "close ties" to the country and certainly makes it quite easy to meet most of the specific expectations laid out in the manual.

And yes, I'm sure you will have no trouble at all in terms of demonstrating language abilities. There is also an expectation that you be well informed on Swiss history, politics, and geography, which might or might not be tested as part of the process.

Again, good luck, and keep us posted.
Yes you are right i misread. I got confused by one part of this text which summerizes quickly the two different purposes of reintegration and facilitated naturalization in one single paragraph.
Yes I will prepare well and I will make it.

Thanks again
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Old 15.11.2014, 16:57
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

You can read the text of article 58a here http://www.admin.ch/opc/fr/classifie...208/index.html

I don't see how a great great grandfather would be enough.

But ignoring that for a moment, you will still be expected to demonstrate ties to Switzerland. Maybe a trip to Basel and a personal effort to excavate the family records could be useful, and if nothing else, would bring you into some contact with your heritage (patrimonie?)

Bonne chance,
Britt
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Old 15.11.2014, 21:33
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

My great-grandfather was born in Switzerland and immigrated to Brazil. My grandfather was born in Brazil but always kept his Swiss identity and passport. My mother was born in the USA but has been a Swiss citizen her whole life.

I was born in the USA before 1985 and the law at that time did not allow Swiss women married to a non-Swiss to pass on citizenship to her children. My other siblings are all Swiss citizens since they were born after 1985 and were registered.

I did not think I could apply for citizenship, but after reading this thread I contacted the consulate, they said I may be able to apply with Article 58a.

I've been to Switzerland three times and have friends and relatives there that would be good references. I attend a local Swiss club and can communicate in a national language.

For those of you who have more information or have gone through this process, I have a question:

Do you think that even though my grandfather and mother were not born in Switzerland my application would have a reasonable chance of being accepted? As I said, they both were registered with the Swiss consulate at birth and have had Swiss passports their whole lives. Or would they consider that only my great-grandfather is really "Swiss" since he is the one that was born there and emigrated - therefore, I am applying as a great-grandchild of a Swiss?

The consulate seemed to think I could apply, but I'm not sure how seriously my application would be considered.

Any insight or advice would be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance.
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Old 15.11.2014, 21:45
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

If their births were registered with the consulate and they have Swiss passports, yes.
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Old 17.11.2014, 12:50
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Do you think that even though my grandfather and mother were not born in Switzerland my application would have a reasonable chance of being accepted? As I said, they both were registered with the Swiss consulate at birth and have had Swiss passports their whole lives. Or would they consider that only my great-grandfather is really "Swiss" since he is the one that was born there and emigrated - therefore, I am applying as a great-grandchild of a Swiss?
If you think about it, it's likely that most applications made under this article (58a of the citizenship law) come from people whose mothers or grandmothers were born outside Switzerland, or at least spent their adult lives abroad, as these were the women most likely -- under the old text of the law -- to lose and to be unable to transmit their Swiss citizenship as a result of marriage to a foreign husband, so the fact that your last Swiss-born ancestor is several generations back in the family tree is not in itself a problem. I believe you will find several people in this thread who have had success in similar situations.

What the Swiss administrative manual on citizenship (section 4.7.2.4 again; section (b) (ccc)) does say is that how recently, or how far back in the past, emigration took place might be taken into account as part of the overall picture in cases in which there is some doubt about whether or not the required "close ties" exist, the assumption being that there is an inverse relationship between the number of generations separating an applicant from an ancestor who lived in Switzerland on the one hand and the likelihood of there being "close ties" on the other ... but again, this is one of the "additional criteria (playing an important role in dubious cases)" (as it says in the manual) that would be much less important than the "obligatory criteria" (visits to Switzerland and references in Switzerland) and the "basic criteria" (including knowledge of a national language and of Swiss history, politics, and geography; and contact with Swiss citizens and associations abroad). If you have those criteria covered pretty well (and it sounds like you do), you shouldn't have any trouble.
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Old 17.11.2014, 13:16
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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...Do you think that even though my grandfather and mother were not born in Switzerland my application would have a reasonable chance of being accepted?...
Absolutely. You were born to a Swiss mother. That's a fundamental requirement. All that's left is connecting the dots with documentation — certification of your birth and her marriage (and whatever else the consulate says is needed) — and demonstrating your ties to CH, which you've already described here (although another visit and studying up on your personal knowledge of history, current events, etc. wouldn't hurt).
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Old 17.11.2014, 20:05
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Do you think that even though my grandfather and mother were not born in Switzerland my application would have a reasonable chance of being accepted? As I said, they both were registered with the Swiss consulate at birth and have had Swiss passports their whole lives. Or would they consider that only my great-grandfather is really "Swiss" since he is the one that was born there and emigrated - therefore, I am applying as a great-grandchild of a Swiss?
Let me give you "proof by example" (I am mocking myself here...). My great grandfather was born in Switzerland and moved to Chile in 1881 (or thereabouts, plus or minus 3 years). My grandfather, my father and I were born in Chile. Still, I got my Swiss citizenship back around 2008.

So yes, as others have mentioned, you should go for it. See this thread for many examples of what is required, how to prepare and what to expect.

Good luck and keep us posted.
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Old 17.11.2014, 21:38
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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Finally, if you're going to do this, I would pursue the matter as quickly as possible, as the new 2014 citizenship law does not include the provision allowing the non-Swiss grandchildren of Swiss grandmothers to have access to facilitated naturalisation. A date for that law to go into force has not been fixed by the Federal Council, but it will presumably be within the next year or so. (A post elsewhere suggested it would be by 2016, at the latest, after cantonal citizenship laws are harmonized with the new federal law.)
I may be mistaken but it appears the new law also increases the language requirement - even for facilitated naturalization applicants abroad (such as a 58a application). It is now required to be able to speak and write in a national language. This may be of interest to those applying abroad.

I'm not sure what they will do to verify this, once the law is in effect, but it seems like the language evaluation will soon be more involved.

Here is a link to the new law in German: http://www.parlament.ch/sites/doc/Cu...t%20NS%20D.pdf
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Old 17.11.2014, 22:06
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

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I may be mistaken but it appears the new law also increases the language requirement - even for facilitated naturalization applicants abroad (such as a 58a application). It is now required to be able to speak and write in a national language. This may be of interest to those applying abroad.

I'm not sure what they will do to verify this, once the law is in effect, but it seems like the language evaluation will soon be more involved.
Yes, while there is currently a general expectation that a facilitated naturalization applicant will have some degree of language ability, it appears that requirement will be enshrined in law when the new legislation goes into force.
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Old 22.01.2015, 18:04
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

Greetings - I apologize in advance for the lengthy post -

I’ve posted on this forum before and have been very grateful for the advice received.

My grandfather, mother, and most of my siblings are Swiss citizens. When I was born, the law did not allow my mother to pass on citizenship to me. The law was later changed, but it was too late for me.

I thought my opportunity was gone forever, but after reading this forum and speaking with the consulate, it appears I can apply for facilitated naturalization.
I have been to Switzerland three times in the last few years, have friends and relatives there, and can speak Italian and a little German. I attend a local Swiss club.

I have young children and just started a career in the USA and do not plan on living in Switzerland in the near future. My question/concern is explaining the reason I want to apply for citizenship. It is difficult to put into words. My primary reasons are: I feel a strong connection to the country because that is where my family came from, and as I’ve traveled there, met relatives and friends, and studied Swiss history and politics, my desire for citizenship has grown stronger. I would also like my children to have the chance to stay close to Switzerland and be citizens as well.

I know the motives for applying are personal and varied. But do you think my motives “makes sense” and are they something that Swiss officials will endorse? Or are they looking for a more solid reason, such as plans to live or work in Switzerland?

I really appreciate any insight or comments.

Thank you and best regards
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Old 22.01.2015, 18:50
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

It absolutely makes sense. I think you could go for the angle that your mother always planned to pass it on to her children, but that the law at the time made that impossible for you. It is especially obvious since your siblings have it, but you do not... and you can provide documentation of their citizenship and everything. And even without your citizenship, you still kept ties to Switzerland and would like to secure it for yourself like your siblings have in order to keep the connection and pass it on to your own children.

You could also always say that you would like the opportunity to work and live in Switzerland should that become available in the future. Never know what will happen wherever you are now and Switzerland should be a "home country" for you. Plus you probably want your kids to have the right to study or work there if they desire.
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Old 22.01.2015, 19:26
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Re: Facilitated naturalization interview

It makes all kinds of sense. You must prove "affinity" with Switzerland, in a vaguely defined way. Everything diamondscan said applies. I would absolutely go for it.

Good luck. Keep us posted.
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