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Old 10.05.2021, 09:32
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Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

So this is my situation:

As it says in the title of this thread, I'm a non-EU person (specifically from Peru) who wants to apply for a long-stay visa (Visa D). I'm almost done issuing all the paperwork they asked me for, and the last one is gonna be issued at the beginning of June. I'm planning to move with my partner (we're not married yet) to her house with her family (her parents, siblings, and so on) in the canton of Fribourg. My partner's family is gonna take care of all the financial matters (both for the visa and when I move there to live in Switzerland; and yeah the embassy told me this is possible to do).

First of all, I wanted to know if my case sounds good enough to be accepted by the Swiss authorities. All my paperwork is on order and clean, but I wanted to know if COVID, the content of the invitation letter, or saying that I will stay for an "indefinite period of time" will affect my visa's approval.

Secondly, I wanted to know if the canton of Fribourg takes a long time to process this kind of documents. I'm asking cause I've read from other threads that the time for approval may vary depending on the canton and that Geneva takes a long time to be approved haha.

Thirdly, I've got some doubts about the residence permit. While investigating "official" information about this I've read that you should apply for a residence permit during the 14 first days after your arrival to the country, but I've read some threads that either tell a different experience or say it's not always the case ¿Could someone explain this to me? I would also like to know how long it would take for the entire process of permit B's approval.

If anyone has either some useful information or tips, wants to tell their experience and so on it's totally welcome I'm open to everything, either it's encouraging or discouraging haha.
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Old 10.05.2021, 09:56
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

I can tell you my experience of non-EU B permit approval, however, this was without coming to Switzerland first on a D-permit.

As non-EU you need to find an employer who will then justify to both cantonal and state authorities that the role could not be filled by either a Swiss or EU citizen. Once this happens you are issued with cantonal approval, followed by state approval which is valid for a short-time.

When you land in Switzerland you then have 14 days to register in the local community whereby you are then issued with an official permit card.

I'm not sure what the process is if you're already there on a D permit though.
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Old 10.05.2021, 11:35
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

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I can tell you my experience of non-EU B permit approval, however, this was without coming to Switzerland first on a D-permit.

As non-EU you need to find an employer who will then justify to both cantonal and state authorities that the role could not be filled by either a Swiss or EU citizen. Once this happens you are issued with cantonal approval, followed by state approval which is valid for a short-time.

When you land in Switzerland you then have 14 days to register in the local community whereby you are then issued with an official permit card.

I'm not sure what the process is if you're already there on a D permit though.
This is nothing to do with the OP's situation since they're hopefully coming here under family reunification.

Mattunnoir, a Type D visa is for people staying for an indefinite period. It's basically a visa that let's you enter Switzerland for more than the 90 day tourist limit.

There's no way to say if your case it good enough because it mainly depends on whether they accept the parents' info as being good enough or not. If they decide either the financial or accommodation side of things isn't then it won't matter how good your info is, you won't get a family reunification permit or the visa.

And yes, you need to register within 14 days of arrival. Your permit would already be approved so what you're doing is filling in the paperwork needed to have it issued to you.
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Old 10.05.2021, 14:45
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

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First of all, I wanted to know if my case sounds good enough to be accepted by the Swiss authorities. All my paperwork is on order and clean, but I wanted to know if COVID, the content of the invitation letter, or saying that I will stay for an "indefinite period of time" will affect my visa's approval.
The "indefinite period of time" is correct, as you are applying to be let into the country to live with and marry your partner, that is, to settle here, with her.

The authorities will check that you yourself are "clean".

After that, they will check the parents' and your fiancée's situation. For family reunification to be permitted, the people already living in Switzerland must prove that they have enough space to accommodate the incoming person, and enough money to support them. The Swiss government is trying to avoid getting into the situation of letting someone in, but then having to support them financially.

Therefore, in generall, your fiancée should be earning enough to support you, so that, if you move in with her, she will be able to pay the costs of the rent for you both, and also all of her and your costs for medical insurance, dentistry and glasses (not all covered by insurance), transport, clothes, food, etc., in other words all of your needs.

Since you say that her parents are involved, then they, too, should be able to demonstrate this.

About accommodation: it is usually not considered enough for a newly married couple to live in only one room. On this forum, we have seen a number of people whose applications have been rejected on the basis that the Swiss authorities consider the accommodation insufficient for two people. It might be different, in your case, if you and the family intend for you to live with them, permanently.

In any case, the fiancée and the family should be ready and able to prove, with documents, that they have sufficient room for you in their home, and sufficient income and/or assets to support you fully.

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Secondly, ...
I hope someone else will answer you, for that canton.

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Thirdly, I've got some doubts about the residence permit. While investigating "official" information about this I've read that you should apply for a residence permit during the 14 first days after your arrival to the country, but I've read some threads that either tell a different experience or say it's not always the case ¿Could someone explain this to me? I would also like to know how long it would take for the entire process of permit B's approval.
Approved persons who wish to enter Switzerland for the purpose of getting married are given a D visa. This is so that they do not enter as tourists, and that is why a D visa can last longer than 90 days.

Once you are here, you should register with the Swiss authorities. They will then issue you with a permit. Your D visa then becomes irrelevant, as its purpose was only to let you in. The permit is what lets you stay.
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Old 11.05.2021, 09:40
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

First of all, thank y'all for all this information, especially you Doropfiz

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The authorities will check that you yourself are "clean".
By clean you mean that my documents are in order and that my criminal record is clear right?

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For family reunification to be permitted, the people already living in Switzerland must prove that they have enough space to accommodate the incoming person, and enough money to support them.
How would they be able to prove there's enough space in the house exactly? I mean there IS some space cause there is an extra room for guests, but would they have to send pictures of it or the blueprints of the house when it was made (yes they made it) or something like that or what exactly?

Also, since the parents are also getting involved in this matter would they have to sign the invitation letter as well and send a copy of their passports?

Is it possible to send the swiss ID instead of the passport tho? I mean the parents have their own but my partner is the one who hasn't renewed it in a long time. She has the money to pay the fee but she doesn't know how long it will take to be issued and that might be a problem if it takes too long cause we want to issue the visa maximum at the beginning/middle of June. I ask this cause I supposed they asked for a copy of the passport to check if the hosts are actually Swiss.

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Once you are here, you should register with the Swiss authorities. They will then issue you with a permit. Your D visa then becomes irrelevant, as its purpose was only to let you in. The permit is what lets you stay.
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And yes, you need to register within 14 days of arrival. Your permit would already be approved so what you're doing is filling in the paperwork needed to have it issued to you.
Oh okay haha, I was scared for a second. I guess they will probably give me the permit B, I've heard that with that permit you can both work and study in Switzerland legally during your stay, is that true?
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Old 11.05.2021, 10:42
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

Yes, with a family reunification permit you can work/study with no problems.
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Old 11.05.2021, 15:59
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

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By clean you mean that my documents are in order and that my criminal record is clear right?
Yes, that is what I meant. And also that you really need to supply each and every document they request. For example, if you have been told that your birth certificate must have been issued within the last 6 months, it just won't work if you submit and older version, and so on.

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How would they be able to prove there's enough space in the house exactly? I mean there IS some space cause there is an extra room for guests, but would they have to send pictures of it or the blueprints of the house when it was made (yes they made it) or something like that or what exactly?
If the parents built the house themselves, then it will be registered with the municipality or land registry as the kind of house it is. There will be some formal document which states that it is a four room, or six room, or whatever it is, house. That might be enough. The parents should state how many people live there now, and that fact, too, will already be registered at the municipality, and each person will already have a document showing that they live there.

The parents and your fiancée should state that there will be enough space for you and your fiancée to each withdraw to have your own privacy. If the house has, for example, enough space for two rooms to be reserved for exclusive use by you and your fiancée, that's the kind of thing to mention. If you and she would also have an own toilet, and/or an own bathroom, or if you would have a separate entrance, so much the better.

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Also, since the parents are also getting involved in this matter would they have to sign the invitation letter as well and send a copy of their passports?
Yes. And if your fiancée will not be able fully support you, financially, (that is the usual requirement) then she will need to ask her parents to provide details of their own finances and to formally declare their willingness to support you.

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Is it possible to send the swiss ID instead of the passport tho? I mean the parents have their own but my partner is the one who hasn't renewed it in a long time. She has the money to pay the fee but she doesn't know how long it will take to be issued and that might be a problem if it takes too long cause we want to issue the visa maximum at the beginning/middle of June. I ask this cause I supposed they asked for a copy of the passport to check if the hosts are actually Swiss.
The general principle is to deliver exactly what they asked for. However, in Switzerland, for all purposes of identifying oneself, the passport and the ID card are used interchangeably. Another two pieces of information which identify one are the document issued by the municipality to prove that one lives there (in German that is called the Schriftenempfangsschein) and one's Social Security Number (in German that is called the AHV-Nummer). Also a document stating the original place from where that family (historically, often generations ago) originated (in German this is called a Heimatschein).

Your fiancée should apply for exactly what she has been told to submit. Then, if any of those documents (such as the passport) have not yet come through by the time she submits the application, she should submit a copy of her old, expired document and/or any or all of the above plus a copy of her application (and copies of all the supporting documents she sent in with each application) for the correct document, to show that she is then still waiting.

Always keep a copy of every document you submit and every letter you write to the authorities.
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Old 15.05.2021, 21:23
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

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The "indefinite period of time" is correct, as you are applying to be let into the country to live with and marry your partner, that is, to settle here, with her.

The authorities will check that you yourself are "clean".

After that, they will check the parents' and your fiancée's situation. For family reunification to be permitted, the people already living in Switzerland must prove that they have enough space to accommodate the incoming person, and enough money to support them. The Swiss government is trying to avoid getting into the situation of letting someone in, but then having to support them financially.

Therefore, in generall, your fiancée should be earning enough to support you, so that, if you move in with her, she will be able to pay the costs of the rent for you both, and also all of her and your costs for medical insurance, dentistry and glasses (not all covered by insurance), transport, clothes, food, etc., in other words all of your needs.

Since you say that her parents are involved, then they, too, should be able to demonstrate this.

About accommodation: it is usually not considered enough for a newly married couple to live in only one room. On this forum, we have seen a number of people whose applications have been rejected on the basis that the Swiss authorities consider the accommodation insufficient for two people. It might be different, in your case, if you and the family intend for you to live with them, permanently.

In any case, the fiancée and the family should be ready and able to prove, with documents, that they have sufficient room for you in their home, and sufficient income and/or assets to support you fully.


I hope someone else will answer you, for that canton.



Approved persons who wish to enter Switzerland for the purpose of getting married are given a D visa. This is so that they do not enter as tourists, and that is why a D visa can last longer than 90 days.

Once you are here, you should register with the Swiss authorities. They will then issue you with a permit. Your D visa then becomes irrelevant, as its purpose was only to let you in. The permit is what lets you stay.
Hi! I see the same people on also another relevant thread which I would like to jump and know more about. I see that Medea Fleecestealer has pointed out that the spouse should have enough earnings for a couple to be able to support the dependent, until they themselves find a job. Do you know where I can find some more info about how much exactly is enough for 2 people, is there a min. salary that is requested from the government on the spouses side? What are their requisites as to what is the appropriate amount to have, or the size of the flat as you also mentioned. Moreover, can the dependent just declare their own savings account, without having to prove where/how they got it?
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Old 15.05.2021, 21:44
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU

As far as I understand it, only the earnings (and perhaps assets) of the person who already lives in Switzerland are relevant.

This is because that person-already-here is the one to make the application, so it is they who have to demonstrate that they can fully support their partner-who-is-not-yet-here, and not just temporarily but on an ongoing basis.

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Old 01.06.2021, 11:46
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Apply for a Visa D as a non EU: Part Two

So I posted my experience, plan and story for getting a visa D before, here is the first post so you can catch up and know what's going on: https://www.englishforum.ch/permits-...ml#post3304379 now I want to update it and tell how everything is going.

First of all I've been trying to look for a small job there so I can have enough money to pay my insurances, taxes and all other expenses (and to save some money for the future of course) while I'm living there but as far as I ve'been told if you don't have any higher education (like university or anything like that) it's more difficult to get a decent paid job or even a low paid one, is it true? Another point to take in my is that my French has improved drastically over the time but it still needs to be polished a lot and I suppose that's a negative point for me too, what kind of job I could apply for in this situation? Is there the possibility to work as a freelance on the work ambit of my choice? Are jobs like graphic design, illustration or video editing decently paid and very requested? And if so, can I work at that at home (because of quarantine and such)?

Then my partner and I been looking for information about the health insurance but we've got kind of confused about it, which one are the best and cheapest ones on Fribourg? We've been looking at prices on Helsana (the one my partner and her family have) but I would like to know if there is one that is cheaper. Since we're gonna live on the same household would I have to join her family health insurance plan or would I have to join one by myself?

She also told me that there other insurances that are not mandatory to purchase but are highly recommended, like the third-party liability insurance, is there any other insurance like this one? How much do these cost? Do I have to pay them monthly or anually?

I've been told by someone that has tried living in Switzerland before that it would be something very favorable for me if I try to look for a language course (in my case, French) so the authorities notice that I really wanna integrate to the country and do something productive while I stabilize, does this sound like actually a good idea?

I sent an email to the cantonal migration offices of Fribourg and they finally answered and they sent a list or mandatory requirements and documents:

"Dans le cadre de l’octroi d’un visa D pour couple concubin, les conditions ci-dessous doivent être remplies :

> l’existence d’une relation stable d’une certaine durée doit être démontrée ( 2 ans minimum) ;

> l’intensité de la relation est confirmée par d’autres éléments tels que :

- une convention entre concubins réglant la manière eu l’étendue d’une prise en charge de devoirs d’assistance (par ex. contrat de concubinage) ;

- la volonté et la capacité du partenaire étranger de s’intégrer dans son pays d’accueil."

I've met my partner for years ago so there shouldn't be a problem with the first requirement right? What kind of proofs do I have to show? Does online conversations work? Would the french course idea would help me with the last requirement?

They also sent another list of documents but they said the following:

"Dès réception de la demande d’entrée préalablement déposée auprès de notre représentation, les documents et renseignements seront requis :"

Does this mean I have to give those documents for the visa application or when I arrive to Switzerland in the case my visa is accepted?

They also said that the financial guarantee must be given by my partner but in my other post people told me that since I'm gonna live with my partner on her family house the parents are able to give the financial guarantee so now I'm kind of confused haha

Sorry for making it too long but a lot has happened since last time I posted here haha
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Old 01.06.2021, 12:57
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU: Part Two

Hello!

Again you aren't seeking a Visa D, yous are seeking a residence permit (titre de séjour). The Visa D is only what the embassy will put in your passport so you can enter the country. You apply for both a titre de séjour and a visa D at the same time. Once they approve the titre de séjour, they send you and the embassy a confirmation that you can now get the Visa to travel to Switzerland.

Even low-paying jobs here are extremely well paid. Of course the cost of living is generally higher but really, if you do even just a small effort to maintain your living costs down, basically any full-time and many part-time Swiss jobs are sufficient to live. Normally you can work freelance if you get a B permit (but not if you get an L permit), but I don't know if there are more limits in the case of "concubinage".

The cost of healthcare insurance varies depending on a number of things. And they vary not just between cantons but also between communes. Comparis has a tool to compare. The insurance plans based on your details and where you live.

Responsabilité civile insurance is indeed very advisable to have. Other insurance depend on what you have to insure. I'm assuming your household goods will be insured through your partner's household insurance (although they might want to check if they need to increases their insured amount).

Yes, take language courses.

You need to prove the length of relationship. Pictures, correspondence, etc. As they suggest, it's probably a good idea to make a contract detailing the conditions of your concubinage. That both helps demonstrate the seriousness of your relationship and also protects both of you if the relationship turns sour.

The new list of documents they sent you, is due "as soon as the application reaches them". When you apply at the embassy, they forward your application to the immigration authorities in Switzerland. The authorities then need those documents. So if you haven't applied yet, it would be a good idea to attach all the documents on the list already with your application so that they don't have to write to you and ask for the documents and wait for them to arrive.
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Old 01.06.2021, 16:06
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU: Part Two

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Even low-paying jobs here are extremely well paid. Of course the cost of living is generally higher but really, if you do even just a small effort to maintain your living costs down, basically any full-time and many part-time Swiss jobs are sufficient to live. Normally you can work freelance if you get a B permit (but not if you get an L permit), but I don't know if there are more limits in the case of "concubinage".
I'm very glad to hear do you know any webpage where I can look for that kind of job offers (low paid jobs or freelance jobs) either physical or online jobs in Switzerland? I tried looking at jobs.ch but I think that one is more for people with formation, diplomas and higher education degrees. Also my partner tried to look for some jobs on the city she studies (it's a small one, it's not the main city of Fribourg) but most of them require me to have a higher level of French than I currently have.

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Other insurance depend on what you have to insure.
I don't legally own a lot of stuff so I guess the liability insurance and the household insurance would be enough right?

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You need to prove the length of relationship. Pictures, correspondence, etc.
Do you think screenshots of Whatsapp conversations from 2019 are good enough?

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As they suggest, it's probably a good idea to make a contract detailing the conditions of your concubinage. That both helps demonstrate the seriousness of your relationship and also protects both of you if the relationship turns sour.
It sounds somewhat odd but I still like the idea, is there some kind of official form or sample and do we have to do it in a specific way or can we just write a "contract" where we specify some conditions that we both agree on and stuff like that?

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The new list of documents they sent you, is due "as soon as the application reaches them". When you apply at the embassy, they forward your application to the immigration authorities in Switzerland. The authorities then need those documents. So if you haven't applied yet, it would be a good idea to attach all the documents on the list already with your application so that they don't have to write to you and ask for the documents and wait for them to arrive.
I forgot to mention that they said at the end: "La garantie financière doit être apportée par le concubin conformément aux documents susmentionnés." So this means that the new list of documents must be given by the financial guarantors (in this case my partner and her parents) right?
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Old 01.06.2021, 18:32
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU: Part Two

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Do you think screenshots of Whatsapp conversations from 2019 are good enough?



It sounds somewhat odd but I still like the idea, is there some kind of official form or sample and do we have to do it in a specific way or can we just write a "contract" where we specify some conditions that we both agree on and stuff like that?



I forgot to mention that they said at the end: "La garantie financière doit être apportée par le concubin conformément aux documents susmentionnés." So this means that the new list of documents must be given by the financial guarantors (in this case my partner and her parents) right?
I would inquire directly with the authorities to know what they accept as proof that you are in a proper relationship.

For the contract, yes you should draw it up yourself and make it fit to your situation. I don't think it needs to be notarized. Some towns can make a certificate of cohabiting, but they don't all accept to do it.

To your last point, no it doesn't mean they have to submit the documents. It says they must guarantee your financial support. If you have the statement from them that they will support you and some proof that they have the means to do so, then that should go in the documents you submit for the permit application.
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Old 01.06.2021, 18:55
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU: Part Two

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I would inquire directly with the authorities to know what they accept as proof that you are in a proper relationship.
I would expect photographs, proof of time spent together (flight tickets etc).
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Old 01.06.2021, 19:19
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU: Part Two

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...Do you think screenshots of Whatsapp conversations from 2019 are good enough?...
I doubt that alone would be sufficient, even with Covid. The documentation I've seen listed here on EF includes things like shared lease agreements, airfare tickets back and forth for visits, photographs of vacations together, etc. Whatsapp messages could be part of the proof, but not likely to be accepted as all of it. Even airfare tickets that were paid for but cancelled due to the pandemic might be "stronger" proof than online messages.

If Covid has meant you haven't spent much time together, then the Swiss might to ask you to visit each other more using visitor visas first and establish a longer relationship history before they grant a family reunification permit. The authorities are going to scrutinize a bit more if you only have an online relationship and your partner can't yet support both of you financially.
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Old 01.06.2021, 22:38
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Re: Apply for a Visa D as a non EU: Part Two

Documentation of your connection to her parents could help, too. Show how you and they are in touch, and why they have chosen (emotionally, as a result of their relationship to you) to be willing to provide for you financially. Show what you and they have shared in common.

For your partner and her parents, any of these: phone logs, WhatsApp screenshots, mails, facebook, and letters, especially those which describe how you feel connected and your plans together.

Also proof that you have shared many ordinary, everyday matters. For that, photos and receipts can be really helpful: when you went grocery shopping together, when baked that cake for her, a photo she send of something she completed for work or how she'd rearranged her room, the present you made for her father, the time you all sat around the fire talking, late at night, a snap-shot of when you were doing the dishes together after the dinner party, a walk together outdoors. Movie tickets, receipts, online reservations of any kind. Any course in which you were both enrolled.

Also common friends, and how you've spent time with her friends and family and she with yours.

Souvenirs, plain household goods you shopped for together, anything that is decorating your home (maybe she left a post-in on the kitchen cupboard last time she visited you).

In short: anything shows your shared experiences, and that this is a real relationship that has been sustained over a long time. The authorities are trying to be sure that they're not dealing with tricksters, but with honest people in a genuine partnership.
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living in switzerland, moving to switzerland, non eu b permit, visa d




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