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  #261  
Old 20.05.2009, 15:20
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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Student (post doc) permit. Not one covered by the quoted legislation.
Just to share my experience: my renewed permit B, issued just a few days ago, says "Familiennachzug mit Erwerbstätigkeit" (i.e. with work authorization), although I am a non-EU spouse of a non-EU post-doc permit B holder.

Before my permit was renewed, around two months ago, a Fremdenpolizei (my Gemeinde) representative had told me that I wouldn't need to apply for authorization to work because my Familiennachzug status made me eligible to work, no matter the post-doc (Ausbildung) position of my husband.

This is in Bern. I guess the student exception is not across the board.
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  #262  
Old 25.05.2009, 04:31
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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Just to share my experience: my renewed permit B, issued just a few days ago, says "Familiennachzug mit Erwerbstätigkeit" (i.e. with work authorization), although I am a non-EU spouse of a non-EU post-doc permit B holder.

Before my permit was renewed, around two months ago, a Fremdenpolizei (my Gemeinde) representative had told me that I wouldn't need to apply for authorization to work because my Familiennachzug status made me eligible to work, no matter the post-doc (Ausbildung) position of my husband.

This is in Bern. I guess the student exception is not across the board.
How do you know if you B permit has the statement with the right to work - do you find out in Switzerland with you get the actual permit or in your home country when you get the entry visa
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  #263  
Old 25.05.2009, 22:56
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

My experience is that IF you get a B permit, then since January 2008 this allowed your spouse to work (NON-EU)...

However, it appears that the first year for Non-EU, the majority are being issued L permits...that is the risk that you take coming into Switzerland with a spouse - we knew this was a risk, but were still sorely disappointed when my husband was issued an L permit for the first year...

The local Gemeinde told us that it would very likely be converted to a B on renewal after the first year...we shall see.

If one spouse has a Non-Eu B Permit the other spouse is permitted to work, but the employer still has to do some paperwork to make the arrangements...

If one spouse has a Non-EU L permit - then the spouse is not permitted to work - to get a job you either have to find an employer who truly needs your talent/skills/experience and is prepared to go through the entire process for you...or you don't get a job...

My warning would be to watch out! - although in theory it might sound fine to have a year or two where your spouse is not *allowed* to work - it can also be very frustrating, limiting and depressing for the 'trailing spouse'...

If you are Non-EU, expect an L permit the first year and expect your spouse to be unable to work/find a job...for at least one, perhaps even two years...
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  #264  
Old 26.05.2009, 10:50
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

Just to add more info on this, I went to the migration office and the work office in Zurich, to get more info regarding why I got an "L" permit if I had a permanent contract (Im non EU). They told me that I got because Im young (27) , meaning by this that according to them, I have little experience(????) and that I might leave the country anytime, thus giving me a B would be a high risk for them, because If this happened, they would loose a B permit for someone who really needs them, since there is a quota for this. Those are the reasons they gave me in the work office, they are being very selective on who gets a B and is almost a fact I will be on an L in my next renewal, and afterwards I would either get a B or be kicked out, since the L cannot be extended any longer and this would give them time to "verify" I didnt leave early and that my employer really needs me and Im qualified, thats the rationale according to them, at least it my case.

Cheers!

Christian
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  #265  
Old 26.05.2009, 10:57
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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Just to add more info on this, I went to the migration office and the work office in Zurich, to get more info regarding why I got an "L" permit if I had a permanent contract (Im non EU). They told me that I got because Im young (27) , meaning by this that according to them, I have little experience(????) and that I might leave the country anytime, thus giving me a B would be a high risk for them, because If this happened, they would loose a B permit for someone who really needs them, since there is a quota for this. Those are the reasons they gave me in the work office, they are being very selective on who gets a B and is almost a fact I will be on an L in my next renewal, and afterwards I would either get a B or be kicked out, since the L cannot be extended any longer and this would give them time to "verify" I didnt leave early and that my employer really needs me and Im qualified, thats the rationale according to them, at least it my case.

Cheers!

Christian
That's nonsense - I was 27 when I got in here (Non-EU) and got a B. But then again taking in mind the number of people from my country in Switzerland (2500) I don't think we ever fill the quotas. So I'd take only the quota argument seriously - that's what used to happen to EU nationals before - they'd get an L the first couple of years and then a B.
Just my 2 cents.
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  #266  
Old 26.05.2009, 11:01
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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That's nonsense - I was 27 when I got in here (Non-EU) and got a B. But then again taking in mind the number of people from my country in Switzerland (2500) I don't think we ever fill the quotas. So I'd take only the quota argument seriously - that's what used to happen to EU nationals before - they'd get an L the first couple of years and then a B.
Just my 2 cents.

I agree that's non-sense, but I have been trawling all kind of answers from the migration office in Zurich, to federal migration office, they all say VERY different reasons, and some of them blame my employer for not applying correctly or blame each other, so the truth, is that I dont know what is it if their reasons were consistent I would not be asking everywhere and trying to push for the B in my next renewal, Im just hoping I can get it.
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  #267  
Old 05.06.2009, 08:30
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

I have had my prospective employer enquire this week and she was told that it was 'normal' for Non-EU to get an L permit for the first two years - 12 months, then 12 months again, before getting the B Permit...

I am warning others because it can be *extremely frustrating* for your trailing spouse if they are not able to work for two years!!!

Be warned...
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  #268  
Old 07.06.2009, 01:04
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

First thank you to all of you who have been contributing to
the Non-Eu treads. I have found very useful information so much so
that I think I finally have figured out what may become my situation,
should I decide to move with my husband.

My question: Has anybody used the services of an immigration lawyer
for clarification or assistance, and is it current and useful practice
to do so? (I'm writing from the USA where, unsurprisingly,
working with a lawyer is probably the best thing to do when dealing
with immigration matters).

Thank you.
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  #269  
Old 09.06.2009, 19:17
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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not able to work for two years!!!
I have investigated on this, and its possible to work IF the prospective employer gets you a work permit, meaning by this, apply for one, demonstrate that there are no locals with the same skills etc...
Plus since the residence is only for one year, maybe the future employer wouldn't not want to risk and to the whole paperwork if in the worst of the cases you are staying only one year. I think thats the big problem.

Cheers,

Christian
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  #270  
Old 09.06.2009, 20:26
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

Exactly right...so being a 'trailing spouse' where both partners are from a Non-Eu country I am no better here work-wise than if I was applying from my home country...the employer still has to jump through all the usual hoops...

So, moral of the story, if you are coming in, plan to be jobless for up to two years, and take the opportunity to find some new hobbies, learn the language and fingers crossed you have the skills/experience/education to get yourself a job on your own merit...

As for the immigration lawyer thing, the 'problem' here is that it's not you that makes the application, it's your prospective employer, so really it's up to them and their resources/experience/commitment/enthusiasm/persistence to organise things with the authorities...
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  #271  
Old 09.06.2009, 20:35
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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So, moral of the story, if you are coming in, plan to be jobless for up to two years, and take the opportunity to find some new hobbies, learn the language and fingers crossed you have the skills/experience/education to get yourself a job on your own merit...
Yup, I agree absolutely, I think that the main barrier is not really the permit, but the language, if you get a B permit and don't speak the local language...it will be still very hard, even though there are some international that require English or other languages, but its the minority...

What I was recommended for the trailing partner, is:
  • Learn the local language
  • Do a internship in a Swiss company (you will get experience in the field there, you many not earn a lot of money though, but you make contacts and probably the possiblity of getting a permanent position, I find this is a very good idea)
Cheers,

Christian
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  #272  
Old 10.06.2009, 16:44
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

Ok first off thanks to all the members who have contributed to the last ten pages on this thread.

I have a peculiar situation, details are below:

Entrance to CH: 10/04 on Carte Legitimation
Started work 02/08 till present: Ci permit

What are my next possible scenarios/steps for moving to a more established permit status, i.e. "C" or "B" residence (with option to work)?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
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  #273  
Old 10.06.2009, 16:52
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

Btw, forgot to note, USA nationality thanks.
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  #274  
Old 18.06.2009, 17:49
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

From original post:
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The prospective employer must do the application on behalf of the prospective employee. The vetting process can take up to three months. Once the authorisation to receive a work permit is delivered, foreign nationals must apply with it for the specific entry visa at the Swiss consulate / embassy of their residence.
My prospective employer is starting the work permit process and they are telling me to go to the Swiss embassy ASAP. There is something that I'm supposed to do there or some forms I must complete. I always thought that I should go to the embassy after the permit is granted.
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  #275  
Old 18.06.2009, 20:05
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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From original post:My prospective employer is starting the work permit process and they are telling me to go to the Swiss embassy ASAP. There is something that I'm supposed to do there or some forms I must complete. I always thought that I should go to the embassy after the permit is granted.
Maybe you need to drop off birth certificates, qualifications, etc.

Why not ask your new employer's HR dept?
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  #276  
Old 23.06.2009, 00:41
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

I did ask... They essentially said "see the consulate ASAP" but they didn't really have any specifics for me. I wrote to the consulate just now; We'll see what they say.
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  #277  
Old 12.07.2009, 13:40
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

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Usual limitation means that the work authorisation is delivered for (i.e. you are allowed to work in that position) a maximum of three years after the issuance date. The permit has a yearly validity so you have to renew it two times. Once the limit is reached, either the company applies for a one-off prolongation of another maximum three years, or it doesn't in which case the holder has to leave Switzerland.
Dear Shorrick

I am new to this forum and I was checking the permits section and found today only about the limited B permits.

I am an Indian National working for a MNC. In my B permit it is stated that "Befristeter Aufenthalt" till September 2010. My questions,

1. once the limit is reached can my company apply for a unlimited period other than another 3 years? or it is a must that it can apply only for another 3 years after which I have to leave the country.

2. Because of above uncertainity, if my son, who is 19 years now having a dependent B permit, choose to study in a neighbouring EU countries, can he still retain his dependent B permit here.

I would very much appreciate your response and thank you for the same in anticipation.
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  #278  
Old 03.08.2009, 16:09
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

Hi Shorrick,

I would like to ask you a question about my case. I am Canadian and was sponsored a B-Permit by my Canadian employer. I moved here 11 months ago. My permit will expire in another month. The company business is not doing well during this economy and my permit will not be renewed by the same employer. My plan is to start my own company in Sarl form with a business partner (who has EU B-permit) in Switzerland. How can I get B-permit in this situation? Can I sponsor myself? What are the conditions and where to start? I plan to stay in the same canton (which makes it easier, I suppose, if not, please comment). Thanks.

Mash
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  #279  
Old 05.08.2009, 08:57
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Re: Non-EU from B to C Permit

we are coming from India and is here in B permit since 2001,last year we changed the canton from fribourg to Zurich, so will the change to zurich will delay the process for getting a C permit?Is there any law that we should be staying in the same canton for 10 continuous years for getting a c permit.
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  #280  
Old 05.08.2009, 14:47
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Re: Non-EU Permits - a few bullet points.

No, you do not need to stay in the same canton. What counts is the cumulative stay in CH.
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