Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Pet corner  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 16.12.2011, 11:54
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Basel
Posts: 28
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 38 Times in 17 Posts
bluegreen has earned some respectbluegreen has earned some respect
What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Hi all,

I recently brought my 20 year old cat to Zurich from the US. She is in good physical shape, active, no serious health issues, good teeth, etc. We tend to go to the vet about once every six months for a checkup and have been doing yearly senior blood screenings for the past few years to check for thyroid/kidney/diabetes issues, etc. All has been clear. She flies fairly frequently (several times a year) and travels well with no adjustment issues. She is half siamese, extremely tiny (less than 6 lbs) and very very vocal and outgoing (one of those dog-like cats).

Anyway.

All this to say that when we arrived in Zurich, she was drinking more water than is normal- no other changes in behaviour. As she is so old I immediately worried about kidney funciton so I found a vet nearby (Dubendorf) and took her in for a checkup.

She doesn't like vets at all and did her normal growling and vocalizing when the vet began the examination (no scratching or biting, she doesn't do that, just 'talks'). The vet immediately stopped the exam and said that my cat would have to be sedated for the exam to continue. I explained that she is just a very vocal cat and would not struggle during the exam. The vet then claimed that without putting my cat under, she was concerned that the cat would have a heart attack on the table and that she was not prepared to be responsible for that.

The vet had not even listened to the heartrate of the cat, her heart is perfectly normal and she has never had heart trouble. In the US and in the UK, all of our vets have strongly advised against sedating her as she is extremely old and very small and putting her under could result in death.

I explained this to the vet and the vet said that she was sorry but that there was nothing she was prepared to do (not even take temperature or examine cat) without putting her under and suggested that I leave the cat at the vet's office for a few hours so they could conduct the exam and take a blood sample for testing. I refused. The vet then gave me medication for kidney disease as she thought that was the likely culprit and told me to administer the pills twice a day for the rest of the cat's life.

I left the office with cat in tow, quite distraught.

Is this normal? Do vets generally recommend sedation for minor procedures? I am a bit concerned now and also a bit freaked out. Worst is that if my partner had gone on his own (he knows little about cats), he would have just let the vet put her under as the vet seemed very authoritative!

p.s.
After calling the vet back in the US I was told that a urine sample could be collected and tested to show diabetes or kidney problems. We did this instead, from the comfort of home, and her kidney function and insulin levels are totally normal. No meds needed after all, she was just thirsty.
Reply With Quote
The following 6 users would like to thank bluegreen for this useful post:
  #2  
Old 16.12.2011, 11:59
Sagitta's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Winterthur
Posts: 706
Groaned at 3 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 1,174 Times in 489 Posts
Sagitta has a reputation beyond reputeSagitta has a reputation beyond reputeSagitta has a reputation beyond reputeSagitta has a reputation beyond reputeSagitta has a reputation beyond reputeSagitta has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

I'm sorry I can't offer any advice, but lots of more knowledgeable members will be along shortly.
I just wanted to share that my cats also drink much more water in Zurich than back home. I suspect it is because of the taste and the smell. My vet said that it was actually a good sign because cats tend to get dehydrated easily.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Sagitta for this useful post:
  #3  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:03
The_Love_Doctor's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zugerberg, Zug
Posts: 3,266
Groaned at 72 Times in 58 Posts
Thanked 3,715 Times in 1,747 Posts
The_Love_Doctor has a reputation beyond reputeThe_Love_Doctor has a reputation beyond reputeThe_Love_Doctor has a reputation beyond reputeThe_Love_Doctor has a reputation beyond reputeThe_Love_Doctor has a reputation beyond reputeThe_Love_Doctor has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Useless vet! I bet he/she wanted to get her sedated to charge you more!

Anyway I also drink lots of water here (I'm not a cat), I think it's because of calc in the water, makes me thirsty all the time, or maybe it's because of the dry air...
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank The_Love_Doctor for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:11
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Basel
Posts: 28
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 38 Times in 17 Posts
bluegreen has earned some respectbluegreen has earned some respect
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

I would also love to know if anyone has personal recommendations for a cat vet who specializes in super geriatrics...
Attached Thumbnails
what-normal-cat-vet-switzerland-strange-experience-charliecute.jpg  
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank bluegreen for this useful post:
  #5  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:12
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
The vet then claimed that without putting my cat under, she was concerned that the cat would have a heart attack on the table and that she was not prepared to be responsible for that.

Is this normal? Do vets generally recommend sedation for minor procedures?
Not used Swiss vets, but it's certainly not normal practice in the UK or in France. I think you did the right thing to walk away, now I suggest you find another vet; I doubt very much if they would also take that view.

All else apart, the risk involved in a general anaesthetic is significant, though small, and would surely outweigh any risk involved by the cat just being a bit wound up.

Sounds like you got a vet who's just scared of cats
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank for this useful post:
  #6  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:13
Traubert's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,124
Groaned at 11 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 2,248 Times in 793 Posts
Traubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

It is not at all normal.

I recently took my Oriental to the vet, he suffered kidney failure and had to be put down. Poor little guy. It's been a month.

Anyway, I'd had two cats for years and they are very vocal. I have never ever had a vet tell me that the cats would need to be sedated for an examination. A twenty year old cat is hardly going to be able to lash out with enough energy or ferocity to warrant sedation.

I would find a new vet.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Traubert for this useful post:
  #7  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:18
17clarence's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Geneva
Posts: 767
Groaned at 15 Times in 12 Posts
Thanked 965 Times in 440 Posts
17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
Useless vet! I bet he/she wanted to get her sedated to charge you more!
I took my old cat (15 at that time) in to have the plaque build up removed.
The vet insisted it was a general anesthetic job, and she had to have blood tests to ensure she could have the drugs safely etc etc. Cost a lot in the end. Nice teeth though.

A few years later, now aged 19, I took her to another vet for the plaque removal due to her gums going red, and this vet just wrapped her in a towel, prized her mouth open got stuck in with long nose pliers and it was job done in a couple of minutes.
Ok, the cat was raging, but the vet said it was the best way with old cats, and anesthetic for that job for any cat was a scam.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank 17clarence for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:23
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Basel
Posts: 28
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 38 Times in 17 Posts
bluegreen has earned some respectbluegreen has earned some respect
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
Ok, the cat was raging, but the vet said it was the best way with old cats, and anesthetic for that job for any cat was a scam.
I guess a lot of it is finding a vet who shares the same philosophies as the owner- I think your second vet is probably more my school. Are they by any chance near Zurich? Have a car so it's not too much of a problem if a vet is drive distance from Dubendorf...

Luckily her teeth are pretty much perfect (left upper fang extraction last year, not put under as it was so loose it could be removed with fingers!! Now she's like Bucky in Get Fuzzy.)
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Birmensdorf ZH, ex-Lausanne
Posts: 415
Groaned at 15 Times in 6 Posts
Thanked 403 Times in 182 Posts
NicoleCZ has a reputation beyond reputeNicoleCZ has a reputation beyond reputeNicoleCZ has a reputation beyond reputeNicoleCZ has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
I would also love to know if anyone has personal recommendations for a cat vet who specializes in super geriatrics...
Bluegreen, I want to know how you got your cat to live that long! My almost 7 year old Pabli is also black but much larger and heavier (he is on a diet though) and my biggest dream in life would be for him to live 13 more years. I'm hoping the weight loss will help.

I don't understand the vet though- i would be worried about putting a 20 year old cat under, just like i would be worried about sedating a 90 year old person. I wish I had more insight, and I wish I knew a good vet in Zurich (I know two great ones in Lausanne that deal with old pets tho).
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:25
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Zurich
Posts: 4,933
Groaned at 184 Times in 120 Posts
Thanked 8,570 Times in 2,876 Posts
Kittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

I'm fond of my vet even though I've only seen him twice, the staff are friendly, the vets are calm and they are reasonably priced. A neighbour of mine with seven Birma also goes there, she's very happy with him. It's Andreaspark Tierärzte, in the Leutschenbach area.
ETA: I just saw on the webpage that Peter Stöcklin, as in the male vet, did a six-month internship in the US and Canada, so he probably speaks good English too as well as being familiar with a different way of doing things. They are open until 19.30 on Tuesdays and on Saturday mornings, useful for those who can't really take time off work.

Last edited by Kittster; 16.12.2011 at 12:38. Reason: Added more information
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Kittster for this useful post:
  #11  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:25
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Basel
Posts: 28
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 38 Times in 17 Posts
bluegreen has earned some respectbluegreen has earned some respect
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
It is not at all normal.

I recently took my Oriental to the vet, he suffered kidney failure and had to be put down. Poor little guy. It's been a month.

Anyway, I'd had two cats for years and they are very vocal. I have never ever had a vet tell me that the cats would need to be sedated for an examination. A twenty year old cat is hardly going to be able to lash out with enough energy or ferocity to warrant sedation.

I would find a new vet.
So sorry to hear about your kitty, I know at 20 we are on borrowed time. And agreed on the 20 year old cat not being ferocious- she's also absolutely tiny!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank bluegreen for this useful post:
  #12  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:32
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Basel
Posts: 28
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 38 Times in 17 Posts
bluegreen has earned some respectbluegreen has earned some respect
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
Bluegreen, I want to know how you got your cat to live that long! My almost 7 year old Pabli is also black but much larger and heavier (he is on a diet though) and my biggest dream in life would be for him to live 13 more years. I'm hoping the weight loss will help.
NicoleCZ, I think it's just luck for the most part- Siamese in particular are very long lived and it's not that unusual for them to hit 20. She's (Charlie's) half siamese and half random street cat so I am guessing she got lucky with the genes. I also feed her high quality food (dry only), which we are having problems getting in CH. I am headed back to the US in a few days so will be mailing loads of it back. Nothing quite like a black cat! Good luck with Pabli.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank bluegreen for this useful post:
  #13  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:34
staceyswiss's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Basel
Posts: 177
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 90 Times in 55 Posts
staceyswiss has no particular reputation at present
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
Hi all,

I recently brought my 20 year old cat to Zurich from the US. She is in good physical shape, active, no serious health issues, good teeth, etc. We tend to go to the vet about once every six months for a checkup and have been doing yearly senior blood screenings for the past few years to check for thyroid/kidney/diabetes issues, etc. All has been clear. She flies fairly frequently (several times a year) and travels well with no adjustment issues. She is half siamese, extremely tiny (less than 6 lbs) and very very vocal and outgoing (one of those dog-like cats).

Anyway.

All this to say that when we arrived in Zurich, she was drinking more water than is normal- no other changes in behaviour. As she is so old I immediately worried about kidney funciton so I found a vet nearby (Dubendorf) and took her in for a checkup.

She doesn't like vets at all and did her normal growling and vocalizing when the vet began the examination (no scratching or biting, she doesn't do that, just 'talks'). The vet immediately stopped the exam and said that my cat would have to be sedated for the exam to continue. I explained that she is just a very vocal cat and would not struggle during the exam. The vet then claimed that without putting my cat under, she was concerned that the cat would have a heart attack on the table and that she was not prepared to be responsible for that.

The vet had not even listened to the heartrate of the cat, her heart is perfectly normal and she has never had heart trouble. In the US and in the UK, all of our vets have strongly advised against sedating her as she is extremely old and very small and putting her under could result in death.

I explained this to the vet and the vet said that she was sorry but that there was nothing she was prepared to do (not even take temperature or examine cat) without putting her under and suggested that I leave the cat at the vet's office for a few hours so they could conduct the exam and take a blood sample for testing. I refused. The vet then gave me medication for kidney disease as she thought that was the likely culprit and told me to administer the pills twice a day for the rest of the cat's life.

I left the office with cat in tow, quite distraught.

Is this normal? Do vets generally recommend sedation for minor procedures? I am a bit concerned now and also a bit freaked out. Worst is that if my partner had gone on his own (he knows little about cats), he would have just let the vet put her under as the vet seemed very authoritative!

p.s.
After calling the vet back in the US I was told that a urine sample could be collected and tested to show diabetes or kidney problems. We did this instead, from the comfort of home, and her kidney function and insulin levels are totally normal. No meds needed after all, she was just thirsty.

the vet was totally wrong! how dare a doctor (human or animal) give out medication without truly knowing what is wrong!
happy to hear you did not follow the doctor's advice
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 16.12.2011, 12:38
17clarence's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Geneva
Posts: 767
Groaned at 15 Times in 12 Posts
Thanked 965 Times in 440 Posts
17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
I guess a lot of it is finding a vet who shares the same philosophies as the owner- I think your second vet is probably more my school. Are they by any chance near Zurich? Have a car so it's not too much of a problem if a vet is drive distance from Dubendorf...
sorry, this was in the UK.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 16.12.2011, 13:18
darkhorsedrea's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Uster
Posts: 800
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 747 Times in 290 Posts
darkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond reputedarkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond reputedarkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond reputedarkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

I have had a similar experience with my dog at our local Swiss vet. I have a cat too with Kidney failure and refuse to take her to him because of what he is like.

My 18 month old lab is a little fearful and more sensitive since we moved here from the UK 6 months ago, understandably I might add.

So off she went to the vet to register etc. The vet did not touch her, greet her, or show any signs of welcoming a young noticeable fearful dog. Instead he stood up tall and looked at her and when she started barking at him he said what is worng with your dog, why is she doing that??

I know my dog very well and this is her reaction to a fearful interaction. He was not empathetic to this situation and said I needed to hold her down for an examination. Reluctantly I did because we needed to register her BUT i have never been back.

In fact we go to Germany now, for another reason with our other dog...long story, and she is much calmer. In fact my cats will go there. The vet in Germany is friendly and greets the animals before us.

What you vet said is not normal. In fact at 20 years old sedating an animal is more dangerous and could cause a heart attack. You know your animal so stick to your gut feelings.....walk away.
__________________
The best way to save water is to bathe together
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 16.12.2011, 13:25
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Basel
Posts: 28
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 38 Times in 17 Posts
bluegreen has earned some respectbluegreen has earned some respect
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
sorry, this was in the UK.
The vet that pulled her fang by hand was in the UK (York). The best vet we've ever had was in Edinburgh.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 16.12.2011, 15:13
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: na
Posts: 11,248
Groaned at 37 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 26,732 Times in 8,253 Posts
meloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Not a cat owner, but since the vets' practice is almost my second home these days...

No - what you describe is wrong. Find another vet. Now.

In searching for a vet, I look for the vet's 'soft' skill with my dogs, his/her medical skills, what services the practice has to offer, and his/her attitude towards owners. In an ideal world a vet would score high on all criteria, but sometimes you need to compromise depending on the needs of the animal.

I had a highly vet-phobic dog. With many vets he became terrified to the point of losing control of his bladder, hit the ground and refused to move. Once in the exam room he would shake and try to hide - and unless muzzled he might bite if he felt he could not escape.

This behavior had less to do with a vet's skill in animal handling than with my dog's reaction to personality types. Many excellent vets simply didn't 'click' with my boy. Yet with a few vets he was an almost-angel.

I needed someone who, aside from medical skills, was able and willing to treat him. I interviewed many vets before I found one with whom my boy felt comfortable. This vet was flexible in his approach, willing to build a relationship with my dog and to work with me to find solutions. Without that flexibility and understanding, treating my guy would have been impossible.

Now - this was a very small practice; while the vet has very good medical skills he cannot offer a full range of services - he does basic care, basic routine surgery, x-rays, but no 'bells and whistles' like ultrasound, endoscopy, MRI, CT scan, specialist care, etc. I would have liked a clinic offering more services, but I had to compromise given my dog's behavior.

But then - 90% of what I need a vet for this vet could offer. So we stayed with him as our primary - and when we needed something more, he referred me to a specialist.

For some animals, finding a vet whose 'soft' skills match the animal's needs is the primary concern. I'd suggest interviewing other vets - call and ask for an introductory appoint where no treatment other than handling is done. (Any vet who is not willing to do an introductory appointment is likely not one for your kitty.)

Hope you find someone better suited to your cat.

----

For owners of vet-phobic animals I highly recommend 'Low Stress Handling, Restraint, And Behavior Modification For Dogs And Cats' by Dr. Sophia Yin. This is written for veterinarians and animal care professionals, but there is much the owner can learn to help his/her animal cope with the stress of a vet exam, and to help to minimize risks to all concerned. The book is expensive - but so is losing a finger.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stress-Handl...4040584&sr=1-1
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank meloncollie for this useful post:
  #18  
Old 16.12.2011, 15:45
darkhorsedrea's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Uster
Posts: 800
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 747 Times in 290 Posts
darkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond reputedarkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond reputedarkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond reputedarkhorsedrea has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
Not a cat owner, but since the vets' practice is almost my second home these days...

No - what you describe is wrong. Find another vet. Now.

In searching for a vet, I look for the vet's 'soft' skill with my dogs, his/her medical skills, what services the practice has to offer, and his/her attitude towards owners. In an ideal world a vet would score high on all criteria, but sometimes you need to compromise depending on the needs of the animal.

I had a highly vet-phobic dog. With many vets he became terrified to the point of losing control of his bladder, hit the ground and refused to move. Once in the exam room he would shake and try to hide - and unless muzzled he might bite if he felt he could not escape.

This behavior had less to do with a vet's skill in animal handling than with my dog's reaction to personality types. Many excellent vets simply didn't 'click' with my boy. Yet with a few vets he was an almost-angel.

I needed someone who, aside from medical skills, was able and willing to treat him. I interviewed many vets before I found one with whom my boy felt comfortable. This vet was flexible in his approach, willing to build a relationship with my dog and to work with me to find solutions. Without that flexibility and understanding, treating my guy would have been impossible.

Now - this was a very small practice; while the vet has very good medical skills he cannot offer a full range of services - he does basic care, basic routine surgery, x-rays, but no 'bells and whistles' like ultrasound, endoscopy, MRI, CT scan, specialist care, etc. I would have liked a clinic offering more services, but I had to compromise given my dog's behavior.

But then - 90% of what I need a vet for this vet could offer. So we stayed with him as our primary - and when we needed something more, he referred me to a specialist.

For some animals, finding a vet whose 'soft' skills match the animal's needs is the primary concern. I'd suggest interviewing other vets - call and ask for an introductory appoint where no treatment other than handling is done. (Any vet who is not willing to do an introductory appointment is likely not one for your kitty.)

Hope you find someone better suited to your cat.

----

For owners of vet-phobic animals I highly recommend 'Low Stress Handling, Restraint, And Behavior Modification For Dogs And Cats' by Dr. Sophia Yin. This is written for veterinarians and animal care professionals, but there is much the owner can learn to help his/her animal cope with the stress of a vet exam, and to help to minimize risks to all concerned. The book is expensive - but so is losing a finger.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stress-Handl...4040584&sr=1-1
I found something similar too with the Swiss vet here which probably didn't help the situation. I didn't like the dog and I believe she sensed it and that increased her anxiety.

If you don't feel comfortable the animal will also feel uncomfortable.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 16.12.2011, 17:30
Nil's Avatar
Nil Nil is offline
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Basel
Posts: 10,356
Groaned at 428 Times in 333 Posts
Thanked 16,045 Times in 6,322 Posts
Nil has a reputation beyond reputeNil has a reputation beyond reputeNil has a reputation beyond reputeNil has a reputation beyond reputeNil has a reputation beyond reputeNil has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Traubert, so sorry for your lost!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Nil for this useful post:
  #20  
Old 16.12.2011, 17:59
Traubert's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,124
Groaned at 11 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 2,248 Times in 793 Posts
Traubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What is 'normal' for a cat vet in Switzerland? Strange experience.

Quote:
View Post
Traubert, so sorry for your lost!
Thanks Nil. It broke my heart, I don't think I'll ever get over this little guy. He was just too cool. I don't want to hijack the thread, but I'd like to show you my little boy, mon petit perdu.

Reply With Quote
The following 8 users would like to thank Traubert for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is normal milk sold in Switzerland Vitamin D fortified? wintimiss Food and drink 50 30.01.2012 12:31
Cat tooth problems... Good Vet in Basel? staceyswiss Pet corner 1 27.04.2011 12:46
What is the normal amount of apartments that you should apply for before acceptance? Swisstobe Housing in general 5 19.05.2010 22:00
Is this normal? [death and debt in Switzerland] ch-expat Complaints corner 22 23.09.2009 00:07


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:24.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0