Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Pet corner  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 26.04.2017, 10:51
NotAllThere's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Baselland
Posts: 10,929
Groaned at 166 Times in 144 Posts
Thanked 15,511 Times in 6,274 Posts
NotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

All quite different from when (1970s) and where (UK) I grew up. Pet insurance wasn't even on the radar, and injured pets were routinely put to sleep if it cost too much to treat.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 26.04.2017, 11:27
tesso's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: zurich
Posts: 457
Groaned at 22 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 279 Times in 152 Posts
tesso is considered knowledgeabletesso is considered knowledgeabletesso is considered knowledgeable
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

I think it depends a lot if you always use the same vet. My daughter is a vet and when they have people that they have never seen before, they have to ask for the money up front cos so many people didnt pay or even gave false names and addresses, having said that don`t think she would let an animal suffer cos they couldnt pay
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank tesso for this useful post:
  #23  
Old 26.04.2017, 12:32
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Zurich
Posts: 4,106
Groaned at 113 Times in 71 Posts
Thanked 6,186 Times in 2,199 Posts
Kittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
I think it depends a lot if you always use the same vet. My daughter is a vet and when they have people that they have never seen before, they have to ask for the money up front cos so many people didnt pay or even gave false names and addresses, having said that don`t think she would let an animal suffer cos they couldnt pay
My vet is the same. There was a case where a cat was still in the prime of his life apart from requiring an operation to fix him after an accident and the owner was unable/unwilling to pay; they fixed the cat at own cost and then rehomed the little chap. I guess you can't afford to do this too often and I think there will be cases where some agreement is reached to allow the owner to keep the cat.

You never know why someone has ended up unable to pay - in my case it would be that I don't work sufficient hours to earn the sort of salary that allows you to save a lot of money in the first place combined with shelling out 900 francs a month for school. Someone else may have just had to raid their kitty kitty to pay for some health thing not covered by insurance.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Kittster for this useful post:
  #24  
Old 26.04.2017, 12:36
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SZ
Posts: 9,707
Groaned at 23 Times in 22 Posts
Thanked 21,532 Times in 6,923 Posts
meloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

I'm glad to see that this thread has sprung back to life, as it is so important to highlight the need to plan ahead, including thinking about finances should (doG forbid) an emergency crop up.

Savings, insurance, credit cards, family who can help out if needed - think about what you would or could do if suddenly faced with a bill of several thousands. A beloved pet facing a serious (and treatable) illness is an emotional wringer itself, don't add to your stress by scrambling to figure out the finances at the same time.

A good relationship with your vets helps. If as a long time patient of the practice you find yourself in the situation where in one partiular instance you cannot pay all at once, ask if you can put X down and then pay the rest in regular installments. And then make darn sure you stick to the agreement. While many practices have had to get strict wrt payment policies, a long time customer facing an extraordinary situation, who is known to be trustworthy, can sometimes work out an individual arrangement.

But if you are new to the practice, don't expect the same consideration. Too many irresponsible people have ruined it for the rest of us.

As mentioned earlier - my dogs did not have many vet expenses in their younger days. But as they grow older the bills get heftier, that is to be expected.

The golden oldie days (and bills) might be far off for many of you, but take the time now to think about how you will finance Fido's golden years. Or the unexpected emergency, which can happen at any time.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank meloncollie for this useful post:
  #25  
Old 26.04.2017, 13:37
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Zurich
Posts: 4,106
Groaned at 113 Times in 71 Posts
Thanked 6,186 Times in 2,199 Posts
Kittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond reputeKittster has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Regarding the above - my cats' insurance company only accepts cats as new customers up to the age of seven, after that they are considered "senior" and thus higher risk. This seems ridiculous to me as my cats are turning six and they are as healthy and playful as ever.

Premiums go up a little as they age but there is also a no claims deduction, so if the case of never needing to make recourse to the insurance indeed occurs, well then you just don't pay as much.

I don't know what the cut-off point for dogs is, might depend on the breed. From what my sister said there is also pre-existing conditions to factor in, but I didn't study it closely as I knew I would be insuring my pets from the start.

Something to consider, especially in the light of how quickly circumstances can change, be it for the owner or the pet.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Kittster for this useful post:
  #26  
Old 26.04.2017, 14:47
Medea Fleecestealer's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Misery, but not the SoT one
Posts: 20,353
Groaned at 352 Times in 267 Posts
Thanked 14,802 Times in 8,512 Posts
Medea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
Regarding the above - my cats' insurance company only accepts cats as new customers up to the age of seven, after that they are considered "senior" and thus higher risk. This seems ridiculous to me as my cats are turning six and they are as healthy and playful as ever.

Premiums go up a little as they age but there is also a no claims deduction, so if the case of never needing to make recourse to the insurance indeed occurs, well then you just don't pay as much.

I don't know what the cut-off point for dogs is, might depend on the breed. From what my sister said there is also pre-existing conditions to factor in, but I didn't study it closely as I knew I would be insuring my pets from the start.

Something to consider, especially in the light of how quickly circumstances can change, be it for the owner or the pet.
Which is why I advocate having a separate bank account instead. When I first starting doing this most pet insurances only went up to age 8 and then you couldn't have insurance any longer. Most have now either extended the age limit or as you say increase premiums as your pet gets older. With a bank account you put in as much or as little as you want when you want. Total flexibility, no age restrictions, no increased premiums, etc, etc.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Medea Fleecestealer for this useful post:
  #27  
Old 23.06.2017, 14:54
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 238
Groaned at 82 Times in 40 Posts
Thanked 102 Times in 70 Posts
koblenz is considered unworthykoblenz is considered unworthykoblenz is considered unworthykoblenz is considered unworthy
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
Worth mentioning that my vet who is a personal friend, said "pet insurance isn't worth taking out". Most people pay the premiums and rarely have to make a claim.
True.

Whilst we would no longer be able to get cat insurance I believe as our cat is too old.
If I think how much I have spent on vets in total over the years, it doesn't come close to the total in premiums that we would have had to pay, without even considering the excess.

Quote:
View Post
We have never been asked for payment up front.
We have on a couple of occasions when our regular vet was on holiday. However it wasn't because they didn't know us, there was a sign that said immediate cash payments only.

Last edited by koblenz; 23.06.2017 at 14:56. Reason: add
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank koblenz for this useful post:
  #28  
Old 23.05.2018, 13:29
zurich99's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: zurich
Posts: 396
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 306 Times in 119 Posts
zurich99 has earned the respect of manyzurich99 has earned the respect of manyzurich99 has earned the respect of many
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Hi there, im tagging on to this tread rather than start another...

We have a Main coon, she is 1.5yrs old. We didn't think we needed insurance as she is an indoor cat from a breeder and has a full family history (with no known disease)
But on a recent trip to the vet she suggested that we get pet insurance as she will have to have all her teeth out at some point
Apparently this is an ongoing issue for Maincoons - although through my research I didn't read anything about that

She also tends to get persistent ear infections, anyhow so now im researching pet insurance, and I have not found one that includes dental?? Am I looking in the wrong place (comparis) or is this simply not something that is covered?

Im torn between putting say 50-100chf away per month and hoping that anything serious comes later rather than earlier... I think the vet suggested when she is about 4 years old for the dental.

Any thoughts on pet insurance that I haven't thought about?

We had our Bermese for 10 years in Australia - bought from a pet shop looking back now I didn't even consider how dodgy that was!
I never had any insurance and as an outside cat, we only went to the vet once when she had a fight with a possum!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank zurich99 for this useful post:
  #29  
Old 23.05.2018, 13:36
Helm's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Zürich<->St.Gallen
Posts: 2,200
Groaned at 13 Times in 13 Posts
Thanked 4,095 Times in 1,362 Posts
Helm has a reputation beyond reputeHelm has a reputation beyond reputeHelm has a reputation beyond reputeHelm has a reputation beyond reputeHelm has a reputation beyond reputeHelm has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

The in-laws adopted a cat from a Spanish shelter, and the poor animal was constantly in pain due to teeth problems.

They had to remove all the teeth (with the exception of the canines).

The extraction was in total 2000 chf. (all the previous consultations extra)
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Helm for this useful post:
  #30  
Old 23.05.2018, 14:15
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SZ
Posts: 9,707
Groaned at 23 Times in 22 Posts
Thanked 21,532 Times in 6,923 Posts
meloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
But on a recent trip to the vet she suggested that we get pet insurance as she will have to have all her teeth out at some point
Apparently this is an ongoing issue for Maincoons - although through my research I didn't read anything about that
I believe the condition you are referring to is Stomatitis. But before accepting a full-mouth extration as inevitable, I'd want to do a lot more research, gather opinions from several vets, and discuss this with other main coon owners.

That said:

As in my previous posts, I do not have pet health insurance. It simply is not cost effective for me, as my dogs were adopted older, some with pre-existing conditions.

(Do make sure you understand the fine print definition of pre-existing condition; including whether or not breed would be considered a pre-existing condition.)

Several of my dogs have had some very expensive illneses, in fact I'm waiting for Hooligan's recent Tierspital bill and will be thrilled if it is only in the four figure range.

Still I would not consider insurance, I would rather not deal with the bureaucracy and navigating my way through restrictions and limits when I can pretty much accomplish the same goal by putting what I'd have to spend on premiums into savings. In doing so I have a nice emergency fund built up over the years.

When my dog is fighting for her life, I don't want to worry whether X or Y is covered. I feel better with finances under my own control.

YMMV.

But do speak to other vets and main coon owners about the dental issue... Fingers crossed your girl doesn't develop this condition.



ETA:

Looking over Haifisch's records, he had all but 4 teeth extracted by a vet in France while he was at the homeless shelter. The bill was ca. 400 Euros. This was in 2007. OTOH, extracting 6 teeth plus bone biopsy (and maybe some other stuff) while the Belltie was gravely ill, requiring an anesthesiology specialist to boot, came to ca. CHF 2000. This was 2016.

So another suggestion would be to compare prices.

And think about timing, if there is an elective component to the decision. When an animal is already ill additional precautions are often needed, making surgery more complicated and possibly more expensive.

All the best to you and your kitty.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank meloncollie for this useful post:
  #31  
Old 23.05.2018, 15:03
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Küsnacht, Switzerland
Posts: 3,943
Groaned at 81 Times in 76 Posts
Thanked 7,732 Times in 3,610 Posts
Blueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

I totally agree with meloncollie regarding pet insurance. Even if I were to have a puppy or kitten with no known issues, and took out insurance at that point, I'd still have a pet bills savings pot as back up.

Two points...

A year ago, our cat had a feline arterial thromboembolism (F.A.T.E.). the first thing the vet advised us upon diagnosis, was that the condition is not covered by any form of pet insurance that he's aware of, so we would definitely be looking at a tierspital bill of CHF 2k+. We were in the fortunate position of being able to say "Whatever it takes. Money isn't an issue." That was the 3rd time I'd had a pet with a condition that wasn't covered by the insurance.

Secondly, I looked after a wonderful 6yr old Maine Coon in the UK for a number of months whilst her owner was recovering from an illness. The cat had fallen out with her litter sister and was refusing to stay at home. When she adopted us, I knew absolutely nothing about cats, so did a hell of a lot of research and spoke to 2 vets I know by email. I never heard of, or was particularly made aware of, this breed having a particular issue with their teeth.

Good luck with your beautiful cat. I'd have another Maine Coon in a heart beat.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Blueangel for this useful post:
  #32  
Old 23.05.2018, 15:55
smileygreebins's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Schwyz
Posts: 378
Groaned at 16 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 769 Times in 218 Posts
smileygreebins has a reputation beyond reputesmileygreebins has a reputation beyond reputesmileygreebins has a reputation beyond reputesmileygreebins has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

It's worth having a family discussion regarding what you be prepared to spend in a pet emergency, and at what point you need to stop spending?


One of my friends had his beloved dog unexpectedly to the vet, and when each operation had complications, a CHF 24,000 bill had been racked up in 2 weeks. At the time, being so distressed about his beloved dog, my friend just kept saying yes to each vet suggestion for more treatments, without the ability to think clearly about the financial consequences.


Another friend racked up CHF 32,000 in operations for emergency & other treatments over 2 months for his dog, and wound up having to sell his car to pay the bill.


Absolutely I understand that for some of us, these critters are beloved family members and that in turn means we'll keep forking out cash to pay for treatments. But I wonder if people get themselves into real financial difficulties as a result?
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank smileygreebins for this useful post:
  #33  
Old 23.05.2018, 17:23
martin959's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 1,134
Groaned at 25 Times in 16 Posts
Thanked 534 Times in 296 Posts
martin959 has earned the respect of manymartin959 has earned the respect of manymartin959 has earned the respect of many
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Probably a silly question, but is as expensive the treatment in other countries? Such as Italy, France, Germany...
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 23.05.2018, 17:43
Ace1's Avatar
A singular modality
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Morgins, VS
Posts: 7,442
Groaned at 264 Times in 179 Posts
Thanked 11,996 Times in 5,293 Posts
Ace1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
Probably a silly question, but is as expensive the treatment in other countries? Such as Italy, France, Germany...
It's been quite a while since we had anything serious with any of our cats, but the surgeries that we've had in France cost nothing like the figures quoted here. Things like treating a broken hip and in another case amputating one leg (to slow down spread of cancer) were in the order of a couple of hundred euros, perhaps up to three or four including drugs and multiple visits. I can't begin to imagine how serious something would have to be to rack up a multi-thousand bill for surgery.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Ace1 for this useful post:
  #35  
Old 23.05.2018, 18:24
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SZ
Posts: 9,707
Groaned at 23 Times in 22 Posts
Thanked 21,532 Times in 6,923 Posts
meloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
Probably a silly question, but is as expensive the treatment in other countries? Such as Italy, France, Germany...
From my own experience, routine care here still seems to be rather a bargain. For routine care (vax, worming, check-ups, common illnesses) I am paying less in Switerland today than what my Chicagoland friends do.

Specialist care, emergencies requiring the 'bells and whistles' can be expensive here, certainly - but seemingly on par with, and often less, than what my friends Stateside report.

We have a level of expertise, and the bells and whistles that go with it, readily available to us here in the Zürich area that is well above expectations for such a small country. For which I am so thankful - and frankly, happy to pay for. Haifisch, the Belltie, and now Hooligan - very different outcomes to life-threatening emergencies than I had been braced for, thanks to the immediate accessibility of top flight expertise here.

Yes, that expertise is certainly available back home, heck most of the specialists here have also trained in the US. The difference is proximity - a veterinary emergency is one time I am grateful that Switzerland is such a geographically small country.

Hooligan just spent the longest 10 days of my life hospitalized. The first 5 days, an emergency admission on a holiday and then weekend, were at the local clinic. 5 days, 24/7 care - the cost was only CHF 800. A bargain in my eyes. She was then transferred to the Tierspital. Treatment there included MRIs, ultrasounds, tests, 24/7 ICU. I expect the bill to be larger - but it won't be ruinous.

I was impressed at how well the Tierspital doctors handled the issue of costs. Each step was discussed as to why it might be recommended to help Hooligan. The doctor in charge of her case was upfront about not only risks vs benefit but also costs vs possible outcomes - the discussion was handled in a very sensitive way. At no time did I feel pushed to do anything.

I've never felt that costs were out of line with treatment here, either at the Tierspital or any of the local clinics or practices I have used. I honestly can say that the vets I have seen have my dogs' best interest at heart; they have told me frankly when a procedure was not worth doing, so I trust the vet when he or she tells me that X is recommended it is indeed the right thing for my dog.

I may whine about the Hochpreisinsel in other spheres, but veterinary care is one thing that I consider a very good value in Switzerland. Emphasis on the value - we are fortunate to have this level of expertise readily available.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank meloncollie for this useful post:
  #36  
Old 24.05.2018, 14:24
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SZ
Posts: 9,707
Groaned at 23 Times in 22 Posts
Thanked 21,532 Times in 6,923 Posts
meloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

So I just got the Tierspital bill - and was delighted to see that it was under 2500, of which the MRI was only ca 800.

A veritable bargain, no doubt about it.

We are fortunate to have a world class university that promotes this level of expertise, to have the teaching hospital as a resource, and a system where local practices, clinics, and the university work together to do the best for the animal.

That's one bill very happily paid.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 24.05.2018, 14:35
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 7,122
Groaned at 243 Times in 181 Posts
Thanked 14,967 Times in 5,184 Posts
k_and_e has a reputation beyond reputek_and_e has a reputation beyond reputek_and_e has a reputation beyond reputek_and_e has a reputation beyond reputek_and_e has a reputation beyond reputek_and_e has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
Absolutely I understand that for some of us, these critters are beloved family members and that in turn means we'll keep forking out cash to pay for treatments. But I wonder if people get themselves into real financial difficulties as a result?
it's definitely interesting that people could spend a lot of money to save the life of one animal while they see other animals as consumption goods. it's a strange world.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank k_and_e for this useful post:
  #38  
Old 24.05.2018, 14:53
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Küsnacht, Switzerland
Posts: 3,943
Groaned at 81 Times in 76 Posts
Thanked 7,732 Times in 3,610 Posts
Blueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond reputeBlueangel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
Absolutely I understand that for some of us, these critters are beloved family members and that in turn means we'll keep forking out cash to pay for treatments. But I wonder if people get themselves into real financial difficulties as a result?
I did, but it was coincidence that my dog's arthritis was diagnosed a couple of weeks after separating from my husband. Her monthly vet's bill accounted for more than half of my budget for food, loo roll, etc... There were several pay day loans involved, but I didn't begrudge it as she was my priority. It was purely bad timing, and it's amazing how many dishes you can make from a pallet of budget tinned tomatoes and a bag of onions.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Blueangel for this useful post:
  #39  
Old 24.05.2018, 20:53
Vlh22's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: UK, formerly Vaud
Posts: 1,322
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 1,983 Times in 642 Posts
Vlh22 has a reputation beyond reputeVlh22 has a reputation beyond reputeVlh22 has a reputation beyond reputeVlh22 has a reputation beyond reputeVlh22 has a reputation beyond reputeVlh22 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Slightly off topic...

My job didn't work out (I had a mental health crisis, was made homeless, was housed and lost my job all in the space of a few months).

However being in my own place, feeling low and lonely, my parents told me to get a cat and that they would help me if necessary.

So Talitha and I have been living together very happily for almost a year, and I wouldn't give her up for the world. Sometimes knowing she needs feeding has been the only thing that has got me out of bed.

My vets have a payment plan where I pay £13.50 a month and all of her vaccinations, flea and worming treatments are covered. I also got a discount on having her spayed, and she gets a free six-month health check and unlimited free claw clipping (where they are also happy to answer any general questions).

I have managed to both pay for pet insurance and put money aside for cat sitting and trips to the vets, so hopefully (paws crossed) I won't have to make difficult decisions if something happened to her. It means I have less money for other things, and if my benefits ever get cut I might need to reevaluate... but for the moment, I manage.

And she's worth it!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Talitha small.jpg (224.1 KB, 80 views)
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Vlh22 for this useful post:
  #40  
Old 24.05.2018, 21:21
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 5,038
Groaned at 36 Times in 30 Posts
Thanked 6,738 Times in 2,810 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The importance of emergency pet funds.

Quote:
View Post
... my parents told me to get a cat and that they would help me if necessary.
How very kind! Glad to hear they are supportive, as you've been through a lot.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
costs, emergency vet, pet insurance




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The importance of correct grammar Deep Purple General off-topic 89 08.02.2016 15:45
The importance of pets Peg A General off-topic 5 09.02.2010 18:00


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 17:58.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0