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Old 10.08.2017, 14:41
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Dog transportation from abroad

Hey everyone,

So I moved to Switzerland (Zug) around 5 years ago and I am planning on getting a Siberian Husky. (I know lots about the breed because I have owned one in the past.)

I was wondering if it is possible to buy a dog in another country (Poland) and then just transport it in a car to Switzerland.
I know that my dog must have a passport, micro chip and so on.

I have seen lots of posts about traveling from another country with your dog however i cant seem to find one about living already in Switzerland and buying one abroad.

I would also be very thankful for information on the topic of the costs for all the training sessions, getting a dog passport, dog taxes and vet visits.
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Old 10.08.2017, 16:04
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Re: Dog transportation from abroad

Essentially import while you are resident in Switzerland is the same process as in the other threads. (One difference: there is no exception to docking/cropping ban available for someone already resident in Switzerland, but that should not be an issue with a husky. )

You can read all about it here:
https://www.blv.admin.ch/blv/en/home...frettchen.html

Follow the steps in the tool, here:
http://blv.bytix.com/plus/dbr/default.aspx?lang=en

If you are getting a puppy, be aware that the pup needs to be at a minimum 56 days old. There are special regs for the rabies vac with very young pups, more info on the site linked.

The dog should already have an EU/Polish passport, at least all the info in the passport is required for importation. You will keep that passport and add in info/vax stamps throughout the dog's life. (No Einburgerung for our pets. )

The AMICUS database traces the dog from birth to death so proper paperwork from the breeder is needed. Most EU breeders are familiar with the EU passport regs so this shouldn't be more than a check box issue if you are going to a reputable breeder. (And if the breeder is not familiar with the EU pet passport... alarm bells a-ringing!)

(I know you didn't ask about adopting from a shelter, but info for others reading this thread: Larger shelters outside of Switzerland are likely familiar with EU passport regs but probably not Swiss regs, so be prepared to do the leg work and help the shelter out with paperwork, take all necessary forms with you, so that you can import properly.)

The above assumes you are importing the pup as the owner. If the breeder is shipping a dog to you and you are not on the paperwork as the owner then commercial rules apply.

--

Personal note: Do not go to a breeder who ships pups sight unseen, with no pre-purchase controls. Please go to the breeder in Poland yourself, meet the breeder, assess the breeder's program with emphasis on genetic health and early socialization, meet the parents - and expect to be assessed for suitability yourself. Breeders who do not do this should set alarm bells ringing. Please do not buy from one of the unspeakable 'battery farms' or dog dealers.

--

Be aware of your responsibilities to register with AMICUS within 10 days, which means a vet appointment. You will be switching the ownership data from the breeder to you. I have not imported a dog since the implementation of AMICUS, but under the old ANIS system I needed the 'blue form' from the previous owner (private person, breeder, or shelter) to initiate a transfer of ownership. Hopefully someone who has done this since AMICUS implementation will be along soon. You should contact AMICUS with any questions on forms, processess, etc.
www.amicus.ch

A responsible EU breeder ought to understand cross border regs and paperwork and start the process on his or her end, but you should do the legwork nonetheless. Have the paperwork needed on your end ready, know what the breeder should do and what you should do.

---

Whatever you do, please please follow the importation rules to the letter. Please do not be tempted to smuggle the pup in without proper vaccination or papers. If discovered chances are a pup without proper vaccination or vax docs will be ordered euthanized. Stories of such regularly pop up in the newspapers.

---

Good luck - wishing you and your future pup all the very best!

Last edited by meloncollie; 10.08.2017 at 17:14.
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Old 10.08.2017, 16:17
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Re: Dog transportation from abroad

As to vet recommendations:

As you are in ZG, I think the world of the MyVets practice in Cham:
https://www.myvets.ch

Dr Alexander Gerold and Dr Yuri Béosier have worked miracles with my mutts. They are very skilled, very accessible, very patient and owner focused. English spoken.

Whoever you choose for a primary practice, you should also get to know the Ennetsee clinic which serves as the region's 24/7 emergency clinic:
http://www.ennetseeklinik.ch/site/index.cfm

The dog tax is dependent on the canton/Gemeinde, I'll let the EF Zugers chime in.
(In my village in SZ, the cost per dog escalates with the number of dogs in the household. I pay ca. 500 per year for 3 dogs.)

Training school prices are all over the board. Browse several training school websites, see what is common in your area. More importantly, visit the schools you are interested in, get an idea of how the trainer works and whether the format, personalities, and philosophy meshes with your views and your new dog's needs.

(Most vet practices have a pin board in the waiting room where local trainers and dog care providers post notices. Always a good start.)

To give you an idea, I have a yearly abo for Familienhund classes that works out to something like CHF 17 per class. Special classes such as Team Training, Mantrailing, Hoopers, Agility, etc are a bit more expensive, IIRC I pay something like 26-ish per class for those. All in, I am at the Hundeschule with one or another of my dogs 4 days per week, so I spend several thousand a year on training classes. I know my trainer is fairly inexpensive, though. I have seen some specialist classes, mostly competitive sports, at CHF 100 per class. Group training will obviously be less expensive than 1-2-1.

What sort of training classes are you thinking of doing?

Lastly, while the federal SKN classes are no longer required, I still firmly believe that it is very beneficial for anyone new to dog ownership in Switzerland to take the SKN theory course. There is info you need to know about the unique twists to how ownership is viewed here in Switzerland, and the SKN Theory class is a good way to get that info in one place.


Again, all the best!
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Old 10.08.2017, 17:12
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Re: Dog transportation from abroad

I am planning on my dog getting the required basic training i.e. walking on a leash,sitting on public transport and so on and some agility trainings.
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Old 10.08.2017, 17:41
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Re: Dog transportation from abroad

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I am planning on my dog getting the required basic training i.e. walking on a leash,sitting on public transport and so on and some agility trainings.
Just a bit of pedantry re: required training:

There is no longer a requirement for specific training classes (i.e., the SKN Theory and Practical classes) at the federal level. There are, however, specific classes and/or assessments mandated in some cantons. In some cantons what you need to do depends on breed or size of the dog. Any new dog owner should check out the specific cantonal regulations.

A good summary of each canton's dog law can be found on the Tier Im Recht website, here:
https://www.tierimrecht.org/de/recht/hunderecht/

Zug is perhaps the most laissez-fair of all cantons, there are no specific training requirements.

HOWEVER, I firmly believe that every dog owner is 'required', simply by the responsibility emcumbent on you in taking on a dog, to train his or her dog to an appropriate standard. A good Hundeschule is the way for you and your four footed friend to get off to a good start.

If you get your dog as a puppy, a well-run puppy class would be the first step. Notice I said 'well run'. A puppy class should be set up by someone with significant knowledge of canine development, both physical and behavioral, and age-appropriate socialization. In fact, under the ZH List 1 classes, qualifications to lead the Welpenförderung are separate from qualifications to lead the adult courses.

I bring this up because there are some very bad puppy 'play groups' out there. There is a lot more to puppy class than putting a lot of puppies in a room together. While I firmly believe that a good puppy class is the way to go, be aware that a bad puppy class can do more harm than good. Please research any you are interested in.

After puppy classes, I like 'Familienhund' type classes as a way to start juvenile/adult training. This type of class, which will go by several different names, includes a little bit of everything from classic OB to sports to games. Emphasis is on learning the 'life skills' a dog (and more importantly the owner!) needs to live happily in our human world.

I'm not in ZG, so don't know anyone from personal experience. Do you speak German, or are you looking or a class in English? If in English, can you travel a bit? (EF member CherryTree is a trainer in ZH, runs classes in English. You might contact her.)

But as above, start searching locally. In addition to checking who local vets recommend, here is the Certodog, one of the Swiss training organizations, listing of member trainers, you can search by PLZ or canton:
http://www.certodog.ch/infos/hundeschulen/

(If you speak German and can travel to Wollerau, SZ, I can recommend my trainer...)


'Real' Agility training should not be started until the dog is developmentally mature. The activity can stress developing skeletal system, joints especially, and so is not recommend for puppies or growing dogs. When you can start will of course be breed dependent, but most say not before 12-18 months, larger dogs perhaps even later.

That said, you can certainly start mastering the basics including concentration and ability to follow direction earlier. You could even work on course skills without any impact or jumping - i,e., walking over a barrier, A-Frame and Passarelle almost flat on the ground, slalom spaced appropriate for the youngster, Teeter-totter low and manually controlled descent so there is no impact, etc.

No matter what the dog's age, Agility is properly trained slowly, emphasis on control and mastery of individual elements rather than speed and flying over obstacles. If you work with a trainer who has an interest in Agility, discuss what is an appropriate way to work on basic skills for a very young dog within a general course. (We do this in Familienhund, along with a bit of 'fun' agility.) Then when your dog is old enough, look for 'real' agility options.

(Our canine physiotherapist is heavily involved in the Agility world; he says that he has seen far too many injuries caused by starting before the dog was physically mature. These can have life long consequences.)
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