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Old 10.01.2018, 14:22
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Playing with puppies/small dogs

Hi,

Is there somewhere we can take a little one this weekend to play a bit with puppies or small dogs?

Thank you
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Old 10.01.2018, 15:13
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

I can recommend several places on Langstrasse where you can play with puppies of all sizes. PM me.
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Old 10.01.2018, 15:15
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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I can recommend several places on Langstrasse where you can play with puppies of all sizes.
Not sure if I should thank you or groan.
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Old 10.01.2018, 15:23
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

Not heard of any places that exist like this,


But the closest thing that comes to mind is Dog Sledding if its not been done.


But maybe better to check with them first on age/availability.
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Old 10.01.2018, 16:25
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

Baby goats are probably more amenable to being stroked and prodded by little children - you can do this at the Kinderzoo in Rapperswil when it opens for the season in the Spring.

Small dogs brings to mind terriers which aren't particularly child friendly.
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Old 10.01.2018, 16:30
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

Can you elaborate - are your children looking to make contact with dogs before deciding on owning etc ?
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Old 10.01.2018, 16:32
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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Can you elaborate - are your children looking to make contact with dogs before deciding on owning etc ?
Yea, the little one keeps asking for doggies and keeps walking up to every one of them she sees on the street.

We are still deciding whether to get one and wanted her to get to play a little bit with them before figuring it out.
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Old 10.01.2018, 17:32
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

I understand your motive, and commend you on wanting to to think through whether dog ownership is right for your family at this time, or not...

But please understand: Puppies are not toys. Puppies are not exhibits. A child not used to handling puppies can do significant damage to a pup.

Puppies have razor sharp needle teeth, and most will be too young to have been taught bite inhibition. (That's the new owner's job.)

Puppies often urinate in excitement, all over your lap. (It's the new owner's job to teach the puppy house training, when age appropriate.)

Puppies often get the 'mad zoomies', running around seemingly unthinkingly, running into, over, or around any object, child included, in their way. (It's the new owner's job to teach the puppy self control.)

Mother Nature made puppies so danged cute as a survival mechanism; by utterly melting your heart you forgive and forget all the craziness and mayhem the little rascals bring with them.

The reason good breeders and Welpenförderung classes carefully manage the stimuli (i.e., experiences, including meeting people) young pups are exposed to is to ensure that all experiences encountered in this critical development phase are positive, setting the pup up for success later in life.

A poor experience, such as a small child deciding that the puppy is actually a scary biting machine and screaming, can be devasting to both child and pup.

I would counsel rather getting to know adult dogs of the breeds you are considering. Afterall, the puppy phase is soon over - the adult will be with you for 15+ years.

Towards that end:

The obvious route is to ask friends who have stable, easy going dogs if you can join on walks, and watch how your child reacts to the dog. Is your child interested in the dog throughout the entire walk? Does your child show empathy to the dog? Does he or she understand when the dog has had enough interaction, does he or she follow your instructions reliably wrt to interacting with the dog?

If all goes well after several walks, perhaps offer to dog sit one weekend.

Alternatively, several Hundeschule have variations of 'Kind und Hund' courses, designed to show children how to interact with dogs in a managed, safe environment. Another example: My trainer invites a school class over once a year, the children join us as we work with our dogs, various age-appropriate activities with the dogs are planned. I would guess other Hundeschule do this too.

(My Hooligan was often the demo dog for the lesson that 'not all dogs are perfect'... )

Another possibility is to volunteer to walk shelter dogs. Now, there are often more volunteers than needed on weekends, but call around and see who has need, especially M-F, especially on cold and rainy days. (A good lesson for a child to learn - no matter what the weather, no matter how tired you are, you must walk the dog!)

Now obviously a child cannot be put in charge of walking a shelter dog. You, the adult, are the volunteer, you take the responsibility and above all you must hold the lead at all times. And please be aware that not all shelter dogs are appropriate for people not used to dogs, especially children, some will have behavior issues that mean an inexperienced person should not take charge of them. You should only walk a dog who has been assessed as easy-going, child appropriate. Be aware that some shelters require an orientation day before allowing volunteers to walk the dogs, most will have requirements on their websites.

---

One thing I will stress:

It may be a child's wish that drives the family's search for a dog, but the parents are the dog's owner, the parents are the ones both legally and morally responsable for the dog's care and welfare. You, the parents, must want to bring the dog into the family for yourselves first and fore most - anything else is a recipe for disaster. You, the parents, must have the free time to go to the dog school, to train with the dog every day, to walk the dog several times a day, to feed the dog, to care for the dog, to clean up after the dog - it will all fall on your shoulders. Children love their dogs, certainly - but no child can be responsible for a living, sentient being's welfare. That simply is not fair to either child or dog.

---

Good luck, I hope you find a furry friend to share a walk soon.



ETA:

You might want to look at this thread:
https://www.englishforum.ch/pet-corn...g-program.html

There is a new program being offered, the National Hundehalterbrevet, two voluntary courses that sort of replace the now abolished SKN. The first of these new courses is a theory class, the aim is to get people thinking about whether or not dog ownership is right for them at this time. Perhaps you and your child might take the course together?

EF member CherryTree knows more about these classes, you might want to contact her.
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Old 10.01.2018, 17:38
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

they also eat laptops, remote controls, plants, wallets, shoes, anything that looks a toy, anything that doesn't look like a toy, anything that looks like food, anything that doesn't look like food etc etc ect
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Old 10.01.2018, 18:18
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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they also eat laptops, remote controls, plants, wallets, shoes, anything that looks a toy, anything that doesn't look like a toy, anything that looks like food, anything that doesn't look like food etc etc ect
I once came across Hooligan sitting amidst a sea of yellow, pink, green, and blue confetti, the perfect picture of butter-wouldn't-melt.

And then I looked more closely at the confetti...



First rule of dog ownership: selber schuld.
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Old 10.01.2018, 18:33
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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they also eat laptops, remote controls, plants, wallets, shoes, anything that looks a toy, anything that doesn't look like a toy, anything that looks like food, anything that doesn't look like food etc etc ect
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I once came across Hooligan sitting amidst a sea of yellow, pink, green, and blue confetti, the perfect picture of butter-wouldn't-melt.

And then I looked more closely at the confetti...



First rule of dog ownership: selber schuld.
Barbour was jackets and hats, “cos they were hanging in my bedroom and I got bored overnight!” My avatar, bless her
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Old 10.01.2018, 18:40
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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I understand your motive, and commend you on wanting to to think through whether dog ownership is right for your family at this time, or not...

But please understand: Puppies are not toys. Puppies are not exhibits. A child not used to handling puppies can do significant damage to a pup.

Puppies have razor sharp needle teeth, and most will be too young to have been taught bite inhibition. (That's the new owner's job.)

Puppies often urinate in excitement, all over your lap. (It's the new owner's job to teach the puppy house training, when age appropriate.)

Puppies often get the 'mad zoomies', running around seemingly unthinkingly, running into, over, or around any object, child included, in their way. (It's the new owner's job to teach the puppy self control.)

Mother Nature made puppies so danged cute as a survival mechanism; by utterly melting your heart you forgive and forget all the craziness and mayhem the little rascals bring with them.

The reason good breeders and Welpenförderung classes carefully manage the stimuli (i.e., experiences, including meeting people) young pups are exposed to is to ensure that all experiences encountered in this critical development phase are positive, setting the pup up for success later in life.

A poor experience, such as a small child deciding that the puppy is actually a scary biting machine and screaming, can be devasting to both child and pup.

I would counsel rather getting to know adult dogs of the breeds you are considering. Afterall, the puppy phase is soon over - the adult will be with you for 15+ years.

Towards that end:

The obvious route is to ask friends who have stable, easy going dogs if you can join on walks, and watch how your child reacts to the dog. Is your child interested in the dog throughout the entire walk? Does your child show empathy to the dog? Does he or she understand when the dog has had enough interaction, does he or she follow your instructions reliably wrt to interacting with the dog?

If all goes well after several walks, perhaps offer to dog sit one weekend.

Alternatively, several Hundeschule have variations of 'Kind und Hund' courses, designed to show children how to interact with dogs in a managed, safe environment. Another example: My trainer invites a school class over once a year, the children join us as we work with our dogs, various age-appropriate activities with the dogs are planned. I would guess other Hundeschule do this too.

(My Hooligan was often the demo dog for the lesson that 'not all dogs are perfect'... )

Another possibility is to volunteer to walk shelter dogs. Now, there are often more volunteers than needed on weekends, but call around and see who has need, especially M-F, especially on cold and rainy days. (A good lesson for a child to learn - no matter what the weather, no matter how tired you are, you must walk the dog!)

Now obviously a child cannot be put in charge of walking a shelter dog. You, the adult, are the volunteer, you take the responsibility and above all you must hold the lead at all times. And please be aware that not all shelter dogs are appropriate for people not used to dogs, especially children, some will have behavior issues that mean an inexperienced person should not take charge of them. You should only walk a dog who has been assessed as easy-going, child appropriate. Be aware that some shelters require an orientation day before allowing volunteers to walk the dogs, most will have requirements on their websites.

---

One thing I will stress:

It may be a child's wish that drives the family's search for a dog, but the parents are the dog's owner, the parents are the ones both legally and morally responsable for the dog's care and welfare. You, the parents, must want to bring the dog into the family for yourselves first and fore most - anything else is a recipe for disaster. You, the parents, must have the free time to go to the dog school, to train with the dog every day, to walk the dog several times a day, to feed the dog, to care for the dog, to clean up after the dog - it will all fall on your shoulders. Children love their dogs, certainly - but no child can be responsible for a living, sentient being's welfare. That simply is not fair to either child or dog.

---

Good luck, I hope you find a furry friend to share a walk soon.



ETA:

You might want to look at this thread:
https://www.englishforum.ch/pet-corn...g-program.html

There is a new program being offered, the National Hundehalterbrevet, two voluntary courses that sort of replace the now abolished SKN. The first of these new courses is a theory class, the aim is to get people thinking about whether or not dog ownership is right for them at this time. Perhaps you and your child might take the course together?

EF member CherryTree knows more about these classes, you might want to contact her.
This is one of the things that makes exchanging on EF worthwhile.
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Old 10.01.2018, 20:22
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

I had a dog owner - someone with a dog who was trained to be around young children - coming to Kindergarten to teach kids about dogs. She told them how to move around dogs and how to make contact with them. And how to behave when a dog was barking and intimidating them. Great lesson. The kids loved it. My co-teacher and I later had to play dogs for a week or so, the kids wanted to train what they had learned :-)

I grew up around our neighbors Appenzeller dogs who were working dogs and they took to us children as being part of the herd. During this lesson I became aware that those dogs had taught me all the stuff I had to know about them, unbeknownst to me!

I remember vividly that they followed us when we went into the forest and just looked after us, when me and my best friend were about four years old, babes in the woods :-) Great job they did, brought us home safely, each time. Still miss and remember Prinz, my favourite.

Last edited by marischi; 10.01.2018 at 20:35.
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Old 10.01.2018, 21:04
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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It may be a child's wish that drives the family's search for a dog, but the parents are the dog's owner, the parents are the ones both legally and morally responsable for the dog's care and welfare. You, the parents, must want to bring the dog into the family for yourselves first and fore most - anything else is a recipe for disaster. You, the parents, must have the free time to go to the dog school, to train with the dog every day, to walk the dog several times a day, to feed the dog, to care for the dog, to clean up after the dog - it will all fall on your shoulders. Children love their dogs, certainly - but no child can be responsible for a living, sentient being's welfare. That simply is not fair to either child or dog.
So true.

My family wanted a dog and as much as I like dogs, I had to honestly say that if someone said, "You can have two hours a day to do exactly what you want", taking a dog for a walk in the dark, rain or snow would be really, really low on the list compared with lots of other things I don't currently have time to do.

And the dog-walking is the fun bit!
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Old 11.01.2018, 07:55
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

Thank you everyone. Especially meloncollie who I was sure would chime in with great information.

We definitely do not want to get a dog immediately as we feel the child is too young to understand limits and also take any responsibility.
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Old 11.01.2018, 11:58
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

My 80 something year old neighbour has owned dogs for many years and in the almost 5 years since I have known her she has lost one dog and then the dog she got after that. Neither dog was a puppy.

A few weeks ago I saw her with a new dog. A puppy. Her daughter got it for her. My neighbour is an experienced dog owner. She lives alone and she is exhausted. Despite an abundance of chew toys the puppy is still interested in hands.

Whenever I see the puppy I am outside with our dog who just loves the puppy. I have gloves on.

A puppy is a ton of work. You need to really look at your situation carefully before taking on a puppy.
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Old 11.01.2018, 13:31
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

By coincidence, the adoption vs new puppy issue has been discussed on 'Good Morning Britain' this morning.

Like drkarthiks little one, I was that child who wanted to greet every dog she saw in the street. My mum was always open to the idea of us having a dog, but it took literally years of nagging to get my dad onboard. For years, every night I would circle all the dogs for sale in my dad's evening paper before he got home from work. From being 7, I used to walk dogs for pocket money, so when my dad still said we couldn't have one, me and my older brother stepped up the campaign.

Every night, I circled all the horses and ponies for sale in his evening paper in permanent marker, because his soft spot was always for horses having spent his early childhood around my granddad's working horses. He finally relented when I was 9, and we got a Beagle puppy. Within weeks, my dad and the puppy were inseparable.

You can't predict how the dynamic of your family will change when you bring a dog into it. You can't completely predict who a puppy will latch onto. You can't predict what will spark a wrecking spree in a dog. It took our 12mth old Beagle 20mins to destroy my mum's new leather sofa. So please go down the dog walking route with friends who are owners. That first encounter with a snappy little terrier enroute, might be enough to put you and you child off having a dog until your child is older.
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Old 11.01.2018, 13:48
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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You can't predict how the dynamic of your family will change when you bring a dog into it. You can't completely predict who a puppy will latch onto. You can't predict what will spark a wrecking spree in a dog. It took our 12mth old Beagle 20mins to destroy my mum's new leather sofa. So please go down the dog walking route with friends who are owners. That first encounter with a snappy little terrier enroute, might be enough to put you and you child off having a dog until your child is older.
That is our plan now. Dog walks, find a few people with dogs that are willing to play with little one, and figure out the whole thing.

We are even looking for an apartment with a garden so that we can give the dog space to run etc
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Old 11.01.2018, 14:42
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

As an aside, taking the ship's dog for his morning constitutional yesterday, the OH passed the local ski bus stop and when H walked a bit close to one of the kids (not young but not yet teenage), said child calmly put his hands up in the air and said "stop" to the dog, whereupon H just walked on (he's an amenable chap anyway). Child has obviously been trained about what to do if you don't like dogs, which we thought was brilliant
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Old 11.01.2018, 15:49
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Re: Playing with puppies/small dogs

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That is our plan now. Dog walks, find a few people with dogs that are willing to play with little one, and figure out the whole thing.

We are even looking for an apartment with a garden so that we can give the dog space to run etc
That's an excellent plan. You are wise to take the time now, when your child is young, to learn as much as you can about what the committment of taking on a dog really means.

I grew up with a dog, she was my best friend and confidante, she made my childhood so much richer. I would hope every child who wanted dog could have that same amazing experience. But it's a big step, and the family - which primarily means the parents - need to be at a place where they can happily make the adjustments that bringing a dog into your lives entails.

Wishing you and your youngster all the best, drkarthiks - and when the time is right, to your future four footed friend as well.

---

And an FYI:

As I was googling around for 'Kind und Hund' type programs, I found this group:

https://www.kindundhund.ch

The Verein Kind und Hund is a group in Bern whose mission is to promote a better understanding of dogs, and how to behave around dogs, among school children. They send teams of specially trained dogs/owners to school classes - from their website this looks like a fantastic program. (Probably much like the program you did in your class, Marischi.) The program is structured for children in Kindergarten through class 4.

The Verein only works in Bern and surrounding areas, but if you are in that area and think that your child's class might benefit, perhaps mention it to your school. Or if you live in the area and have a dog who would be good at this kind of thing and have the time, maybe you might want to get involved?
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