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  #21  
Old 27.10.2010, 12:32
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

To me, the first consideration is always quality of life. If there is a chance that a procedure will enhance my dog's quality of life - for whatever length of time remains - then I will pursue that course without question. If a procedure will likely not contribute to his quality of life, or doG forbid, bring about additional suffering in his remaining time, I would likely not go that route.

Quality of life can only be assessed on an individual basis.

To give an example:

Two of my collies developed DM (Degenerative Myelopathy). There is no cure for DM, it is a disease that involves a long, slow decline and loss of mobility. One can support the dog to keep him in condition for as long as possible, try to alleviate pain as it surfaces, but the disease cannot be cured.

My first DM collie was a fighter - it was not in his nature to go quietly into that dark night. So - knowing him, I felt it right to go to the ends of the earth to support him through the disease, to do whatever necessary to prolong his life as long as he continued to enjoy himself. When he lost the use of his back legs we got him fitted with wheels (http://www.eddieswheels.com) so that he could continue to do what he loved most: being out and about, interacting with the world. To see him running through alpine meadows again - you only had to see the look of sheer joy on his face to know that this was the right choice.

He had two good years in the wheels. And even when he grew too weak for the wheels he still was not ready to give up, so we kitted out a Bollerwagon to take him around on our walks. Even though he could no longer be a 'normal' dog, he loved life. His life was perhaps different from other dogs, but the quality of that life was very good indeed.

The eventually day came when he was ready to give up, as we knew it would. And when he showed me that it was time, he went with the dignity he deserved.

My second DM collie was a very different character; he was a homebody even before diagnosis. His greatest love was running after his ball playing fetch; when he too started to lose his back legs, although I knew from his character that wheels probably would not be an appropriate solution for him, I felt I at least needed to give him an opportunity to try to extend his mobility to enable him to do the thing he loved most. As I had thought, though, he didn't like the wheels - so we didn't use them except to get him from the house to the car to the vet's.

It broke my heart knowing that a technology existed to help prolong his life, but using it was not the right thing for my boy. But I had to do what was right for my boy, not for me. So instead I organized my routine to cater to his declining abilities. I curtailed excursions that would have excluded him, built ramps to the house and garden, carried him up and down the stairs when necessary. We played fetch in my garden, I would bowl the ball to him when he could not go after it himself, we spent lot of time together just enjoying the sunshine. I had far less time with my special boy than I would have wished, but that time was - for him - very good. When the sad day eventually came, he too went with the dignity he deserved.

Given that there is a high incidence of DM in collies, I will probably face this decision again some day - and I will make choices based on the needs, wants, and character of the individual dog.

How far to go, when to call it a day, are decisions that can only be made by a loving owner, in consultation with his or her veterinarian. An outsider cannot understand the situation fully and therefore has no place to judge.

Last edited by meloncollie; 27.10.2010 at 15:03.
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  #22  
Old 27.10.2010, 15:10
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

When I was living in the UK and still married, we bought a puppy; a beautiful Cocker Spaniel (actually to replace our previous one that had recently died).
When he was about 4 months old we were walking in a big park, with my brother’s family and several other relatives. It was deep in the winter season and the park lake was frozen over.
We let the dog off the lead as there was no one around and in this part of the park it was allowed anyway.
As we walked around the lake we didn’t notice that the dog had lagged behind, happily sniffing trees and . . well, you know.
As we looked up, we saw that we had rounded the end of the lake and I could see him – so I whistled – he looked up – eventually saw where we were . . . and made a point to point run towards us, straight over the lake!
No!! We all shouted, as the lake was recently frozen over. .but it was too late. After about 20 metres from the side, the ice gave way and under he went.
Now this lake was not very deep, just about 1 metre I guess and there was no current as such but in any case, he disappeared for a second only to resurface with a WTF look on his face and proceeded to attempt to scrabble out.
Result? Women and kids screamed. . Men stared open mouthed – my ex just said to me `well go and get him!!` So in I went – crashing though the thin ice and waded across to where he leapt gratefully into my arms.
The shock of the water temperature was incredible – actually painful.
When I got to the side, both the dog and me were shivering uncontrollably. The family grabbed the dog from my arms and wrapped it in coats – running to the car park to get him home to the warm fire.
I say `HIM` and not `US` as I was completely forgotten. . me, the hero, left on my own with my now minute willy and freezing trousers.
As I waddled home in my wet gear (about 1 mile away) my trousers gradually began to freeze and I arrived back looking like the tin man from the Wizard of Oz.
Okay, it’s true, when I got back there was a hot toddy waiting for me and by then the rest of the family turned their attention to my woes.
Would I do it again? Well for dog owners, they are one of the family and so I would without hesitation I guess.
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  #23  
Old 27.10.2010, 16:51
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

For many people, their pet is as important as any family member.

I have heard of several cases of people going into water, sometimes frozen over, to rescue a pet dog in difficulty. They have ended up needing rescuing themselves, or even losing their own life.
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  #24  
Old 27.10.2010, 17:02
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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When I was living in the UK and still married, we bought a puppy; a beautiful Cocker Spaniel (actually to replace our previous one that had recently died).
When he was about 4 months old we were walking in a big park, with my brother’s family and several other relatives. It was deep in the winter season and the park lake was frozen over.
We let the dog off the lead as there was no one around and in this part of the park it was allowed anyway.
As we walked around the lake we didn’t notice that the dog had lagged behind, happily sniffing trees and . . well, you know.
As we looked up, we saw that we had rounded the end of the lake and I could see him – so I whistled – he looked up – eventually saw where we were . . . and made a point to point run towards us, straight over the lake!
No!! We all shouted, as the lake was recently frozen over. .but it was too late. After about 20 metres from the side, the ice gave way and under he went.
Now this lake was not very deep, just about 1 metre I guess and there was no current as such but in any case, he disappeared for a second only to resurface with a WTF look on his face and proceeded to attempt to scrabble out.
Result? Women and kids screamed. . Men stared open mouthed – my ex just said to me `well go and get him!!` So in I went – crashing though the thin ice and waded across to where he leapt gratefully into my arms.
The shock of the water temperature was incredible – actually painful.
When I got to the side, both the dog and me were shivering uncontrollably. The family grabbed the dog from my arms and wrapped it in coats – running to the car park to get him home to the warm fire.
I say `HIM` and not `US` as I was completely forgotten. . me, the hero, left on my own with my now minute willy and freezing trousers.
As I waddled home in my wet gear (about 1 mile away) my trousers gradually began to freeze and I arrived back looking like the tin man from the Wizard of Oz.
Okay, it’s true, when I got back there was a hot toddy waiting for me and by then the rest of the family turned their attention to my woes.
Would I do it again? Well for dog owners, they are one of the family and so I would without hesitation I guess.
Wow,thats what i call devotion to your dog ! Fairplay.
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Old 27.10.2010, 17:04
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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My first DM collie was a fighter - it was not in his nature to go quietly into that dark night. So - knowing him, I felt it right to go to the ends of the earth to support him through the disease, to do whatever necessary to prolong his life as long as he continued to enjoy himself. When he lost the use of his back legs we got him fitted with wheels (http://www.eddieswheels.com) s
That must be the greatest thing inveted ever ! and you see, it did pay off for the dog as he kept going for another 2 years with the wheels, that is some serious animal loving indeed.
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Old 27.10.2010, 17:55
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

Over the past two months we have spent thousands on our pets. Eldest Basset had a herniated disc and we opted for the surgery. It was the best solution and she is doing great. Total cost was in excess of 3,000 chf.

Youngest dog is hearing impaired and we felt we owed it to her to do the diagnostic tests to see the cause and possible treatment. Total cost was over 2,000 chf. The end result is that some of her hearing has been restored, they said it wasn't much but it seems to us she hears much better.
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Old 27.10.2010, 18:10
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

My dad always groaned when we had to invest money into our animals. We had a cat - who got hit by a car, not fully, but swiped a bit?

Did some damage to his back leg, and tail. Do not remember the costs of the surgery - but the vets fixed him up - removed something from his leg - but he was able to walk on it.. limped on it for a bit.

The vet was not sure if the tail would survive, and unfortunately, a week or two later, the tail really started to smell - basically had to remove it, so he was left with a stump of a tail - but he was healthy - died of some kidney problems a few years later, but unrelated to the accident...

Yes - as I said my dad always groaned about dishing out the money, but that was the way he was, it did not mean he did not want too... he would have - just always complains having to spend money!!
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  #28  
Old 27.10.2010, 18:26
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

It depends on the age of the animal, but mainly on quality of life after the op/treatment. If a wonderful friend and pet is seriously ill or injured, I would prefer to have him/her (can't say 'it' for a friend) put out of its misery quickly. We have been so blessed to have pets who have all lived to very old ages and very healthy - but when the time came, made what we always felt was right for them.
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  #29  
Old 27.10.2010, 18:38
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

Since the question was raised about pet insurance, here is what I came across beginnig this year, searching for information of what todo when importing bunnies or pets.

" All dogs over six months old must be registered with your municipality of residence. Licenses are issued upon presentation of an international vaccination certificate. Some cantons require you to take out liability insurance beforehand, so you will need to contact your municipality regarding this matter. You will be given an aluminum tag with the animal’s date of birth, license number and issuing canton. The tag must be fastened to your pet’s collar and worn whenever the animal is outside. Any dog found without a collar will be taken to a kennel, where an attempt will be made to find it a new owner or, failing that, it will be put to sleep. Game wardens have the right to kill dogs they find without collars.”

So its in everyones benefit that you have an insurance, altough no price is to high for our beloved pets, its nice to know some part of It could be covered by insurance , here are some of the companies that insure pets in Switzerland :

http://www.bonus.ch/Tierversicherung/Haustiere.aspx
http://www.swisscare-intl.com/swissc...insurance.html
http://www.animalia-tierversicherung.ch/de/index.aspx
http://www.versicherungs-offerten.ch...Fc1D3godzSK-jA
http://www.mobi.ch/mobiliar/live/ver...herung_de.html
http://www.haustier-versicherung.ch/news/
http://www.epona.ch/german/
http://www.erv.ch/main.php?chapter=5000
http://www.svv.ch/article1819/konsum...rsicherung.htm
http://kontakt.haustierversicherungen.com/
http://www.kleintiere-schweiz.ch/ind...av=113&ID=1705
http://www.horses.ch/de/Reitsportsuc...cherungen.html
http://www.versicherungenvergleich.c...leistungen.php

Hope the above links can be of any use to all

* please note that i am not affiliated with any of the links above *
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Old 27.10.2010, 18:46
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

How far would you go to save your pet? If it floats, I flush it....
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  #31  
Old 27.10.2010, 18:59
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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Since the question was raised about pet insurance, here is what I came across beginnig this year, searching for information of what todo when importing bunnies or pets.

" All dogs over six months old must be registered with your municipality of residence. Licenses are issued upon presentation of an international vaccination certificate. Some cantons require you to take out liability insurance beforehand, so you will need to contact your municipality regarding this matter. You will be given an aluminum tag with the animal’s date of birth, license number and issuing canton. The tag must be fastened to your pet’s collar and worn whenever the animal is outside. Any dog found without a collar will be taken to a kennel, where an attempt will be made to find it a new owner or, failing that, it will be put to sleep. Game wardens have the right to kill dogs they find without collars.”

So its in everyones benefit that you have an insurance, altough no price is to high for our beloved pets, its nice to know some part of It could be covered by insurance , here are some of the companies that insure pets in Switzerland :

http://www.bonus.ch/Tierversicherung/Haustiere.aspx
http://www.swisscare-intl.com/swissc...insurance.html
http://www.animalia-tierversicherung.ch/de/index.aspx
http://www.versicherungs-offerten.ch...Fc1D3godzSK-jA
http://www.mobi.ch/mobiliar/live/ver...herung_de.html
http://www.haustier-versicherung.ch/news/
http://www.epona.ch/german/
http://www.erv.ch/main.php?chapter=5000
http://www.svv.ch/article1819/konsum...rsicherung.htm
http://kontakt.haustierversicherungen.com/
http://www.kleintiere-schweiz.ch/ind...av=113&ID=1705
http://www.horses.ch/de/Reitsportsuc...cherungen.html
http://www.versicherungenvergleich.c...leistungen.php

Hope the above links can be of any use to all

* please note that i am not affiliated with any of the links above *
This is so useful, thank you so much. I am looking to buy a kitten here but was always scared of vet prices and would love ot be able to get insurance.

Again, to reply, the cat I have at home (the "other" home) I would go to any length to help her, should there be a real chance for her to actually feel better afterwards and regain her quality of life. She is now 12 years old, I've had her since I was 11 and I truly hope she will stay healthy for as long as possible because I am terrified of the idea of her feeling unwell and me being unable to help her...
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Old 27.10.2010, 19:04
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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I say `HIM` and not `US` as I was completely forgotten. . me, the hero, left on my own with my now minute willy and freezing trousers.
Duuuuh...dude, what did you expect? Your dog to towel himself dry, and make his hot chocolate? And I bet he's cuter and furrier.

Great story though!
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  #33  
Old 03.11.2010, 12:59
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

I agree with Meloncollie here. It depends on the dog's character. A few years ago, back in SA, our 10 year old lab got lung cancer. She was still so full of life we did everything we could. Took her to a specialist vet, she got all the treatment she needed, paid for without arguing. She had a good last summer, swam in the pool every day, chased the ball, loved us to bits, ate very well. But then the medication stopped working and she became quiet. Went off her food. Lay down most of the time. Eventually she showed us she was ready to go and my son took her to the vet. By that time she could only lift her head, wag her tail and give us all goodbye kisses. She was put to sleep in my son's arms, very peacefully. I'll never know whether we prolonged it too much. But she was cremated and her ashes came to Switzerland with us, in a box together with a photo of her swimming.
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Old 03.11.2010, 13:08
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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Dogs are man's best friend ... and vice versa.
Not entirely true.......The poo-picking-up-business is only one-way
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Old 03.11.2010, 13:15
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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Not entirely true.......The poo-picking-up-business is only one-way
You need to train the dog better.
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Old 03.11.2010, 18:54
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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For me it depends upon the prognosis for the pet following surgery.

IF the pet will have a good life - not having to be force fed medication after medication, one to help with the trouble and another three to help with the side effects of the one - then I could see going to fairly extensive measures.

On the other hand, if the pet will indeed have to take medications with wonky side effects which would make the pet miserable... I do not believe in "better living through chemistry" (many apologies to the pharma folks around here)
I side with you here, especially with the "good life" part. A year after we got our rescue puppy, we had gotten her some prednisone because her fall allergy was so bad she was rubbing the skin raw on her front quarter and over one eye. We were desperate to help her stop.

A week later, the scratching had stopped but she vomited. Then she did it again and again, with nasty diarrhea tossed in for good measure. We thought she had colitis, which isn't pleasant. Even the vet wasn't sure. Still we had to buy her special pet food, give her only small amounts of it and water, and she was going to the vet daily for 3 days. The first set of visits it happened we were worried. The second set of visits within a month and we were fearful of being able to provide her with the care she was appearing to need (regular vet visits every couple of weeks, plus a steady supply of very expensive bland pet food, oh and a crapload of regular feedings, including every 2 hrs to let her tummy readjust to sold food) and we resolved that we wouldn't let her starve to death. Either we would control it, find someone to take her that could afford the bills, or put her to sleep.

Fortunately we were able to control it. We are very careful with the allergy meds come fall. (she has about 2-4 weeks of intense reaction) We watch her diet very carefully when she's on the lower doses of prednisone. We also pray for winter to hit so she stops scratching. No more vet visits from it thus far (cross fingers)

Still, we love our pup and wouldn't trade her for anything if we could help it. 11 months out of he year she's happy and healthy. 1 month out of the year, she happy and itchy though
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Old 07.11.2010, 02:20
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

My Husband and I have gone without our life-luxuries to ensure we could afford to explore every possible option with our vet when any of our bunnies needed attention.

One of ours was diagnosed with syphilis after he developed a recurring growth on his bottom lip (recurring because it used to go crusty then drop off when treated with antibiotics only to recur when the treatment stopped).

Many blood tests, xrays, biopsies followed. Eventually he was referred to a specialist at Royal Vetrinary College, Bristol (we lived in Lincoln) so we had to take time off work, drive him down there and stay overnight in hotels while he stayed at the college for his treatment.

Diagnosis of syphilis was confirmed and they determined that our other rabbit was a carrier so both had to be treated. The meds to kill the syphilis costed practically nothing but the after-care they needed (penecilin is potentially fatal for rabbits) was lengthy and costly.

So, Bernard got over the syphilis and Minty stopped carrying it. About 3 months later Bernard contracted Myxomatosis. The vet told us he had very little chance of survival but I battled through it with him (on my own as husband was serving abroad with the RAF). This entailed hand-feeding several times each day (coming out of work to do so and enlisting the help of neighbours when I couldn't get there), sleeping on the sofa some nights when he had found his way to a spot under an open window in the living room - the moving air (draught from the window) was helping him to breath, having both bunnies sleeping in my room when not in the living room so I could get up and calm him every time his airways blocked and he started to panic.

He looked terrible and was in a lot of pain but was only a baby and had already endured months of the syphilis. He was given a 3% chance of survival and thankfully did. What really saved him was the constant attention form his wife, Minty. She spent hours endlessly licking the gunk out of his eyes and nose thus helping him to continue to see as the majority of Myxy rabbits don't and helping him to keep breathing when I couldn't be there.

More than three years have passed and Bernard is now 4 - a rare Myxy surviver. He has scars all over his mouth, ears and feet and the Myxy damaged his respiratory system - the gunk can return - over time it starts to block his nose so he sneezes to clear it, sometimes over and over, sometimes 20 times successively over 10 seconds. Every 3 months or so it gets bad - after every sneeze he wipes his nose with his front paws so sneezing with increased frequency leads to rubbing away the fur and skin around his nose. We know the signs now so before we get to that stage he goes to the vet for a massage (to disperse the gunk) and an hour in a tank of medicated oxygen which stops the gunk for a coule of months. Other than this he is in fine health and may not believe anyone who tried to tell him he is not head of this household.

We have had many other costly rabbit health-related dramas before and after the syphilis incident. I tend to over-react any time Bernard looks even slightly off colour as he has already been through so much. We (Bernard and I) recently took a taxi 20 minutes to an out of hours vet at 2am because he was showing signs of "under the weather"ness. Out of hours anything in Switzerland costs a fortune, as do taxis, particularly when you ask them to wait outside for 30 minutes while your rabbit is checked over.

Of course, the cost of the above is nothing compared to the cumulative cost of all the rabbit treats from Coop, Qualipet, eBay etc and replacement of all chewed items (sofa, standing lamp as cable can't be replaced, books, rug, flooring, skirting boards, nest of tables etc, etc). The longer we have bunnies the better we become at rabbit-proofing the most unlikely of items.

Good luck to all other pet owners out there - I (am my wallet) feel your pain.

Rachel
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  #38  
Old 07.11.2010, 03:16
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

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My Husband and I have gone without our life-luxuries to ensure we could afford to explore every possible option with our vet when any of our bunnies needed attention.Rachel
Hi Rachel,

Wow that is one tough bunny you have there ! Its a good thing he has a bunnyfriend to look after him also.

And you also ofcourse

Joske (grey) and Josie ( white) look after eachother also.
So far so good, Joske only had his "boyz" removed only to find out later Josie was last in line to get her babyfactory sorted, so whe was left without one.

Needles to say Joske was not impressed but they still get allong fine.

We found out that since a while, Josie has a bladder problem.. paid good bit of money in Ireland for xrays and med's but nothing helped.

We continue this now in Switzerland, our vet here found out she has a virus, and she only reacts on 1 out of 14 med's .. now they took blood again to find out what the story is.

It's all hanging together he says, virus thats in her bladder, creating puss and leaking with result.

I feel sorry for Josie as i can't have her running around the place right now without cleaning after her every 2 hops, but still i love her to bits and take my time to play with her on an area in the house that is covered with a big old beach towel.

Josie's happy that way and hopefully we can find a cure for it. Joske roams around like he owns the place and my space in the sofa for some reason

The only thing my vet said when he saw bunnies med's card ( myxy shots every 6 months) from Ireland is that in Switzerland, they don't give them myxy shots, as otherwise they wouldn't know when its happening.

Bit funny but he said no record of this was seen in Switzerland.. is there anywhere you go to get myxy shots? would like to get them onto it just to be sure.

But reading this, yours is one strong bunny, 9/10 don't survive it.
I can only encourage and applaud of what you do and how you care about your pet.

Same here, after what we spend already, a few more or less won't make a difference, as long as both bunnies are happy , them i am happy
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  #39  
Old 07.11.2010, 09:25
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

Hello Joey82 :-)

After all that nightmare with Myxy back in the UK we don't give them those shots anymore because both vets we use here as well as the info I can find on the net say there is no Myxy problem here. If I were to move back to the UK I would certainly ensure they were treated well beforehand though.

While we were in the process of moving here I contacted the Veterinärdienst (Tiere Gesundheit / Schutz / Produkte) in Bern to find out about this sort of thing and what I needed to do / prepare in order to be allowed to bring the bunnies in to Switzerland. They asked me about Myxy and told me that both buns had to be microchipped and be accompanied by paperwork signed by their UK vet which stated they had been clear of Myxy for at least six months. Their website incl contact details is here: http://www.vol.be.ch/lanat/ved/d

That being said, when we moved here we flew directly in to Belp airport just outside of Bern so the "Customs" gy at this provincial airport did stop us so he could check out the bunnies (who arrived on the same flight) but he did nothing more than open the pet carrier and give them both a bit of a stroke - didn't ask about their paperwork or microchips at all!

If you're at all unsure about the Myxy status I would call the Tiere office and find out the latest advice. I think I will do the sane tomorrow as it's been 2.5 years now. The good thing is that my bunnies are house rabbits here in Switzerland (they were in the UK too but there they had daily access to play outside) and we don't live near a lake or too close to a river (Myxy is transmitted by biting flies that hang around near water, primarily standing water) and I take every precaution possible to keep the number of flies getting close to my babies as low as possible (plug-in fly killing devices etc).

I hope any bunny owners reading this ae aware that Myxy cannot be passed bunny to bunny. As happened in our case, one healthy rabbit can live with one Myxy-stricken rabbit and even clean the unpleasant fluids away without risk of infection. In 2007, when there was flooding in summer in England, there was masses more standing water than ever before which brought the biting flies too close. Bernard was bitten but Minty wasn't. I heard many stories over that time of vets putting to sleep pairs or even groups of rabbits because just one had contracted Myxy - I did a lot of research in to it while Bernard had it and it seems to me that lots of healthy bunnies were put to sleep for no real reason.

Your local vet may not be too clued up on Myxy if they think there is no risk etc - I dobt understand why you wouldn't give a bunny the jab just so you could see the symptoms if the disease occurred - if a bunny contracts Myxy you'll see symptoms whether they have had the jab or not but in bunnies who are not jabbed those symptoms will be much worse and almost certainly fatal. All the reading I did explained that the Myxy jab is a synthetic copy of the disease rather than a dose of active disease like many human immunisations so it can't prevent your bunny from contracting Myxy, it can only potentially lessen the symptoms and give them a fractionally increased chance of survival. My vet did agree that without the jab Bernard would almost certainly have died - it made a difference as to how deep in to his organs the disease reached - he was very, very sick but other than his respiratory system the lumps and welts were pretty much restricted to the surface so he was left with mainly cosmetic damage.

Yes, I'm definately calling the Vet place on Monday I don't think any of us could go through that a second time!

It's good to hear there are so many other pet-dedicated folks out there and I heard the other day that it is a legal requirement to keep bunnies in pairs as a minimum here so no lonely bunnis in CH. I haven't researched the truth behind that yet but if it is true I'll be very pleased and may get in touch with our old MP and suggest the same for the UK.

I think we and our bunnies are lucky to have each other I will post a piccie later.

Rachel
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Old 07.11.2010, 15:40
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Re: How far would you go to save your pet

Don't know if I'm going against the grain of this thread.. but doing everything to extend a pet's life is perhaps not always the best option when the pet is suffering.

We had a beautiful large cat, he was half Maine Coone and just a splendid intelligent sleek feline. He walked like a panther.
When he was still young he developped kidney disease and severe kidney stones and regardless of a special diet and lots of care, several times he had to have a catheter inserted to empty his bladder.
Things went from bad to worse and his quality of life became very very poor.

I held him and cried like a little girl when the vet put him to sleep.
I let him go. An operation would have prolonged his life a little longer perhaps, but his suffering was too much.
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