Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Activities > Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 18.07.2011, 14:58
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Vaud
Posts: 4,518
Groaned at 491 Times in 320 Posts
Thanked 4,099 Times in 1,952 Posts
CorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond repute
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Those sticks are really good!

You can use them to hit the random snake appearing in front of you, or move away the bushes with pikes!
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 18.07.2011, 15:02
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 16,471
Groaned at 578 Times in 453 Posts
Thanked 24,630 Times in 9,918 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Quote:
View Post

But then again, last weekend I did a long rock route (18 pitches, all day) with a climbing partner who weighs 50% more than me and is twice as strong/fit as me. He led all the hardest pitches while I struggled to follow wearing a 3 kilo pack. Then we reached the top and he opened ... hold your breath.... a stove and made fresh coffee, and showed me the 4 litres of water he was carrying. I was impressed, shocked, and humbled at the same time. To each their own; I would keel over if I carried his pack, let alone climb.
I hope you told him that he should have only carried one litre maximum and taking any more just wasn't right!

On one hike last year, I drank my carried 1.5 litres + 0.5 litres at a hut and was later still incredibly thirsty. If ElggDK hadn't kindly offered me some from his bottle, I would have wrestled the damn bottle off him anyway!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Tom1234 for this useful post:
This user groans at Tom1234 for this post:
  #23  
Old 18.07.2011, 15:02
Niranjan
 
Posts: n/a
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Quote:
View Post
The problem isn't the experienced people who generally know how much water they need for themselves. It's the people who don't go into the mountains that much and are not acclimated. Tell them they only need a litre and they will be getting uncomfortable quite quickly on a hot day or above about 2200m. Many people do not realise the effect altitude has on their bodies until they experience it themselves and it is better to err on the side of caution and have a little too much water than too little. Especially if a trip can end up taking longer than expected. Realistically we're not really talking about life or death, but I've heard of a number of cases where poorly prepared people have gone into the back country and ended up calling in helicopters purely because they were under prepared.

On my trip last Saturday I took two litres with me and pulled the last sip out of my drink pack with about 30mins to the end of the day. Most other people in the group I was leading did the same. We did have the option of getting top ups along the way if necessary, but even in Switzerland there are a few areas where top ups are not always possible.

My questioning the OP was not for experienced people as they should know their own bodies and skills better than any consensus statement can account for, but the thousands of less experienced people who go into the mountains regularly. For these people saying 1L of water is enough and leave the poles at home may not be the best advice. That is the point I'm trying to get across. People who are regularly in the mountains will know what works for them and what doesn't.

As someone pointed out the best thing is to be well prepared.
Frankly, Sir, I never tell anyone what they should do. I simply share my thoughts and provoke people to think for themselves and decide what makes sense for them. Our bodies are so vastly different that there is simply no point recommending how much to carry. At no point have I said or implied that inexperienced people should carry only 1 litre, or should not carry hiking sticks. If it makes you happy I am willing to share that when I did the 3-pass ride with you, I drank a bit over 5 litres. Context is everything.
Coming to think of it, sticks are very useful to ward off Alpine cows!
Cheers,
N
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 18.07.2011, 15:08
Eire's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tir na nÓg
Posts: 3,626
Groaned at 54 Times in 35 Posts
Thanked 2,386 Times in 1,207 Posts
Eire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond repute
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Quote:
View Post
Frankly, Sir, I never tell anyone what they should do. I simply share my thoughts and provoke people to think for themselves and decide what makes sense for them. Our bodies are so vastly different that there is simply no point recommending how much to carry. At no point have I said or implied that inexperienced people should carry only 1 litre, or should not carry hiking sticks. If it makes you happy I am willing to share that when I did the 3-pass ride with you, I drank a bit over 5 litres. Context is everything.
Coming to think of it, sticks are very useful to ward off Alpine cows!
Cheers,
N
Exactly context is everything, but a statement like the following can easily be taken out of context and have inexperienced people who don't know their bodies as well as you know yours going into the mountains with too little water.
Quote:
View Post

In general, I think this goes against conventional wisdom. Received wisdom is to err on the safer side, but it is erroneous (e.g. wear sturdy mountain boots where a light weight trainer or barefoot suffices and screw your joints, carry 3 litres of water where 1 l of water suffices, end up hiking so slowly that you actually need to consume 3 litres etc.)
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 18.07.2011, 15:18
Niranjan
 
Posts: n/a
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

I think you are now splitting hair, so maybe it is time for me to stop answering you.

This is what I said: carry 3 litres of water where 1 l of water suffices. I was using it as an example of how over-catering can be counter-productive. I can't see how that statement can be construed as referring to a high-level alpine hike in a remote place, and one taking all day. I am resting this point now.

If you have any more substantiated criticisms of the article regarding hiking poles, and why you think the article is rubbish, you are welcome to post them here.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 18.07.2011, 17:31
basher's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 958
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 1,463 Times in 514 Posts
basher has a reputation beyond reputebasher has a reputation beyond reputebasher has a reputation beyond reputebasher has a reputation beyond reputebasher has a reputation beyond reputebasher has a reputation beyond repute
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Well actually it`s a good thread but in the end I think we do all agree but are saying it in a different way.
I think everyone is basically right - but my general rules are:
I know my body and I know that I do the homework - so I take enough for me.
However, I would, if taking other people always advise them to take a little more.
In fact - if I am organising - then I usually take a bit more in case others run out . . . ah, there lies the burden of the organiser.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank basher for this useful post:
  #27  
Old 18.07.2011, 21:13
Deep Purple's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: England
Posts: 5,264
Groaned at 15 Times in 14 Posts
Thanked 5,273 Times in 2,563 Posts
Deep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond repute
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

When you use hiking sticks, do you use the cushioning system in the ends? I prefer the security of the solid feel.

When is it best to use solid/cushioning?
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 18.07.2011, 22:40
Niranjan
 
Posts: n/a
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Quote:
View Post
When you use hiking sticks, do you use the cushioning system in the ends? I prefer the security of the solid feel.

When is it best to use solid/cushioning?
Not sure who this is directed at, but let me try. I think it depends on why you use it. One use is "saving the knees". One of the well-known risks of heavy use of hiking poles (which its proponents often gloss over), is that it can lead to something akin to tennis elbow due to constant jarring of the joint. Such people might benefit from the additional cost and weight of more elaborate shock-absorbing poles.

I use it primarily for balance on T4 hikes (T3 is easy walk for me, and T5 involves climbing in general); I feel most insecure (or less secure) on steep smooth ground which is what T4 typically involves. For my purpose, I prefer the solid feel of a rigid pole.

Mountain racers use poles for terrain over around 20-30 degree steepness, it makes for faster ascent (don't ask me for scientific references, we had this discussion on the Alpine hiking thread and consensus was that it helps over 20 degrees). For them carbon sticks are especially useful, they weigh like 200g; might not last very long though. Shock absorbers don't make sense for them during ascent as they absorb some energy and reduce efficiency.

Some (or most) poles come with hand leashes; some say it is dangerous to keep them on during descents because if you are tripping and need to bail it off, you need your hands free. If you don't eject it in time, it can have far more dangerous consequences. But on ascents, it makes it easier to power up using your arms if you are leashed, I am told. I don't use leashes.

Now happy to stand corrected by our resident expert
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank for this useful post:
  #29  
Old 18.07.2011, 23:00
Deep Purple's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: England
Posts: 5,264
Groaned at 15 Times in 14 Posts
Thanked 5,273 Times in 2,563 Posts
Deep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond reputeDeep Purple has a reputation beyond repute
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Quote:
View Post
Not sure who this is directed at, but let me try. I think it depends on why you use it. One use is "saving the knees". One of the well-known risks of heavy use of hiking poles (which its proponents often gloss over), is that it can lead to something akin to tennis elbow due to constant jarring of the joint. Such people might benefit from the additional cost and weight of more elaborate shock-absorbing poles.

I use it primarily for balance on T4 hikes (T3 is easy walk for me, and T5 involves climbing in general); I feel most insecure (or less secure) on steep smooth ground which is what T4 typically involves. For my purpose, I prefer the solid feel of a rigid pole.

Mountain racers use poles for terrain over around 20-30 degree steepness, it makes for faster ascent (don't ask me for scientific references, we had this discussion on the Alpine hiking thread and consensus was that it helps over 20 degrees). For them carbon sticks are especially useful, they weigh like 200g; might not last very long though. Shock absorbers don't make sense for them during ascent as they absorb some energy and reduce efficiency.

Some (or most) poles come with hand leashes; some say it is dangerous to keep them on during descents because if you are tripping and need to bail it off, you need your hands free. If you don't eject it in time, it can have far more dangerous consequences. But on ascents, it makes it easier to power up using your arms if you are leashed, I am told. I don't use leashes.

Now happy to stand corrected by our resident expert
I am sure I don't do enough hiking to end up with the equivalent of tennis elbow. As I mentioned in my previous post, I prefer the security of the solid feel. I agree that they could use more energy going up hill.

I have carbon sticks that I purchased primarily for their light weight in my luggage. They are about two thirds of the weight of my original aluminium ones. I believe that they are brittle if bent. I guess that if you fell with one end stuck in the ground they may break. I use the straps because they are there. I don't feel that they serve much purpose. As you say, having them attached in a fall could be a disadvantage.
__________________
"I'll say I can't tell you when, But if my spirit is strong, I know it can't be long, No questions I'm not alone, Somehow I'll find my way home" Rod
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 18.07.2011, 23:09
nickatbasel's Avatar
Mod, Chips and Mushy Peas
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Albisrieden
Posts: 5,310
Groaned at 160 Times in 98 Posts
Thanked 8,340 Times in 3,087 Posts
nickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: On the use of hiking sticks in the mountains

Nordic walking sticks are just the thing for blocking the footpath and tripping up joggers who just get on your nerves with all that sweating and being fit.

Cheers,
Nick
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank nickatbasel for this useful post:
Reply

Tags
hiking poles




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Weather in the mountains compared to the lowlands krlock3 Daily life 9 09.12.2010 09:39
Tour of the Dents-du-Midi (hiking in the Alps) Niranjan Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 25 23.08.2010 23:49
Hiking in the rain (high up in the mountains) MusicChick Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 41 07.06.2010 14:24
Suggestions for a week of hiking in the Ticino RetiredInNH Travel/day trips/free time 3 02.04.2010 17:22


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 13:55.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0