Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Activities > Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #201  
Old 19.05.2010, 15:28
wma's Avatar
wma wma is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Bern
Posts: 37
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 24 Times in 12 Posts
wma has earned some respectwma has earned some respect
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
I found with google:

10. Mai 2010 ... Klausen-Pass in beiden Richtungen gesperrt bis 28.05.2010. (Wintersperre).

You have to wait untill June 2010
I found the following page on swissinfo.ch which shows the status of many passes and high roads:
http://www.swissinfo.ch/ger/infos_zu...nfo/index.html

It doesn't have every pass though, for example no information on Grosse Sheidegg (between Meiringen and Grindelwald), probably because (I believe) the road is closed to cars, only open for postauto. Does anybody have a better site than swissinfo for pass closures? Maybe with more webcam photos?

Anyway, I used swissinfo to find that the Glaubenbüelenpass (1611m) is open, so planned a very long tour for today, something like 160km and 4,000m+ of climbing, but the weather didn't play and I bailed out after being rained, hailed and then snowed on at Beatenberg (1200m), so I turned back at Interlaken. Now, of course, the sun's out in Thun and I'm full of regret at not being tougher and weathering the storm ...

Last edited by wma; 19.05.2010 at 15:29. Reason: clarity
Reply With Quote
  #202  
Old 19.05.2010, 20:38
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,911
Groaned at 45 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 982 Times in 657 Posts
blackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeable
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

You can use this website from the TCS Switerland:
http://www.tcs.ch/main/de/home/verke...e_tunnels.html
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank blackbird for this useful post:
  #203  
Old 20.05.2010, 11:56
ChrisW's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Lausanne (or out on my bike)
Posts: 1,780
Groaned at 8 Times in 6 Posts
Thanked 856 Times in 495 Posts
ChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

I know this thread is kind of long, but did you try reading the very first post? I think you'll find all the info there. Your question belongs in the thread linked to below.

Quote:
The TCS website shows which passes are currently open and closed in German, French, and Italian, as does swissinfo (German, French, Italian), and AlpineRoads has similar information for all the Alps (see also the thread "Swiss mountain pasees - Indexes & Opening Dates").
Reply With Quote
  #204  
Old 23.05.2010, 16:40
Yopo's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 318
Groaned at 10 Times in 4 Posts
Thanked 248 Times in 134 Posts
Yopo has earned some respectYopo has earned some respect
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Blackbird, thanks for that. Would do a 'thank' but i don't think i have enough posts yet.
Did it for you
Reply With Quote
  #205  
Old 09.07.2010, 13:01
AntH's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Baden
Posts: 187
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 100 Times in 46 Posts
AntH has earned the respect of manyAntH has earned the respect of manyAntH has earned the respect of many
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Hi guys,

I'm kind of hoping for the cycling buffs to come good for me here with some top tips. 2 weeks ago I was out pass cycling with friends when I blew HARD! I was about 2 kilometers from the top of the last pass when a friend found me lying on the side of the road and donated a mars bar to me. I think I have pinpointed the problem to a lack of calories since after I ate I felt awesome again. I really hate cycling with a bag but I am pretty much stuck doing it now after that horrible experience so I was wondering

What sort of food is good to take for a long day cycling in the hills?

Any suggestions are welcome as I found this is a steep learning curve
__________________
Well spank my ass and call me Charlie!
Reply With Quote
  #206  
Old 09.07.2010, 14:21
Jekyll's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Aargau
Posts: 885
Groaned at 35 Times in 26 Posts
Thanked 1,180 Times in 475 Posts
Jekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Hi guys,

What sort of food is good to take for a long day cycling in the hills?

Any suggestions are welcome as I found this is a steep learning curve
For a long day riding, I'd stay away from sports bars, gels and drinks and go with the kind of food that you would usually enjoy (within reason).

There's endless science behind it but at the end we're (mostly) not professional athletes and common sense is the most sensible approach. You're looking for balance- something you enjoy, can stomach, something salty, something sweet.

There's no one size fits all approach. My bag tends to contain dried fruit, salted nuts, sometimes a couple of carrots (the crunch of a carrot at the top of a long hill is something to be savoured), a couple of cereal bars, some biscuits etc. A good sandwich also takes a lot of beating.

Gels and syrupy drinks can be very effective (particularly in competition where you may not have time to eat something more substantial) but they can also lead to digestion issues, they're expensive, and for a long day you need something more substantial in your stomach.

Cheers

Jekyll
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Jekyll for this useful post:
  #207  
Old 09.07.2010, 14:23
AntH's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Baden
Posts: 187
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 100 Times in 46 Posts
AntH has earned the respect of manyAntH has earned the respect of manyAntH has earned the respect of many
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Thanks for that, I went with just cereal bars last time and discoverd that it was a terrible idea unless you have about 20-30!
Reply With Quote
  #208  
Old 09.07.2010, 14:27
Jekyll's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Aargau
Posts: 885
Groaned at 35 Times in 26 Posts
Thanked 1,180 Times in 475 Posts
Jekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond reputeJekyll has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Thanks for that, I went with just cereal bars last time and discoverd that it was a terrible idea unless you have about 20-30!
As an emergency instant boost I really like the lemon dextrose tablets that you can get at any kiosk. If you always have a pack of those in your bag then you should get to the restaurant at the top!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Jekyll for this useful post:
  #209  
Old 10.07.2010, 09:36
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Thalwil
Posts: 85
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
bazza has earned some respectbazza has earned some respect
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Thanks for that, I went with just cereal bars last time and discoverd that it was a terrible idea unless you have about 20-30!
I've just ordered a very light musette bag (like the profis get handed up in stage races) just for holding food. When the bag is empty it weighs practically nothing and can be stuffed in my jersey pocket (instead of being thrown to my fans in the watching crowd) and reused.

Last edited by bazza; 10.07.2010 at 10:02.
Reply With Quote
  #210  
Old 10.07.2010, 09:55
gdaddy's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: ZH
Posts: 100
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 27 Times in 17 Posts
gdaddy has earned some respectgdaddy has earned some respect
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Did I hear correctly on ITV2's Tour coverage, that on Thursday 8th July stage, one rider consumed 17 x 500ml bottles? (Presumably, this is quite typical, and the figures were just being cited as an example, rather than an exception).

/GD
Reply With Quote
  #211  
Old 10.07.2010, 10:13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Thalwil
Posts: 85
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
bazza has earned some respectbazza has earned some respect
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Did I hear correctly on ITV2's Tour coverage, that on Thursday 8th July stage, one rider consumed 17 x 500ml bottles? (Presumably, this is quite typical, and the figures were just being cited as an example, rather than an exception).

/GD
When you are putting out 300 or more watts in 28-30 C for 4-5 hours then the body has certainly to cool itself down by sweating. But I tend to think eight and a half litres would be a bit much in this time. Perhaps he was a water carrier and passed the bottles to his teammates or poured water over his own body. Or that was his total intake during the non-riding parts of the day as well. I think I read that the body can only take in liquid at the rate of 750-1000ml per hour but stand to be corrected. I suggest that we continue this off-topic on another thread.

Last edited by bazza; 10.07.2010 at 11:24.
Reply With Quote
  #212  
Old 11.07.2010, 09:52
ChrisW's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Lausanne (or out on my bike)
Posts: 1,780
Groaned at 8 Times in 6 Posts
Thanked 856 Times in 495 Posts
ChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond reputeChrisW has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

In an interview after yesterday's stage, Andy Schleck estimated that he'd DRANK 20 half-liter bottles. On the other had, Kloden and Cancellara both lost much more time than they were expected to, and the cause for both of them is said to be partly dehydration. The top riders know only too well what happens when you don't drink enough.

If you're heading into the mountains on a hot day, you might consider attaching a THIRD water bottle holder to your bike, or getting some extra large 1 liter bottles (not all of us have a support vehicle and teammates whose job it is to keep us well supplied). For many ideas of how to put an extra bottle cage on a frame that only has two mounts, see this website.
__________________
Cycling in Switzerland | Photo blog (mostly travel pics from Switzerland)
Reply With Quote
  #213  
Old 11.07.2010, 13:49
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Thalwil
Posts: 85
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
bazza has earned some respectbazza has earned some respect
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
In an interview after yesterday's stage, Andy Schleck estimated that he'd DRANK 20 half-liter bottles.
GULP! Thanks for the info.

I have a problem getting more than half a bottle down during a two hour ride around the Zurichsee. Looks like I'll have to change that habit before I tackle my first passes later this month.
Reply With Quote
  #214  
Old 11.07.2010, 19:59
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,911
Groaned at 45 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 982 Times in 657 Posts
blackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeable
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Are you drinking while cycling or do you make a small break ?
Reply With Quote
  #215  
Old 11.07.2010, 20:46
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Thalwil
Posts: 85
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
bazza has earned some respectbazza has earned some respect
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Are you drinking while cycling or do you make a small break ?
I just take a slurp when riding or when stopped (I'm old school) at traffic lights, or sometimes I stop at a cafe for a coffee. I guess it's better to take a 3min stop every 20minutes and down a quarter bottle or so.

(In my racing days we didn't drink even in 50 mile time trials. In a 100mile event maybe a bottle was handed up. I remember my dad dropping mine at 70 miles so that meant over 4 hours without a drink.)
Reply With Quote
  #216  
Old 11.07.2010, 20:51
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,911
Groaned at 45 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 982 Times in 657 Posts
blackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeable
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

i think it is better not drinking while cycling, usually i make a small break every
25km, have a big slurp and start over for the next 25 km
Reply With Quote
  #217  
Old 12.07.2010, 12:48
sylvain74's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Baden
Posts: 293
Groaned at 2 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 114 Times in 76 Posts
sylvain74 has a reputation beyond reputesylvain74 has a reputation beyond reputesylvain74 has a reputation beyond reputesylvain74 has a reputation beyond reputesylvain74 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
i think it is better not drinking while cycling, usually i make a small break every
25km, have a big slurp and start over for the next 25 km
I'm curious. Is it for some kind of safety reason or because you find it hard to drink while gasping for air?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank sylvain74 for this useful post:
  #218  
Old 15.07.2010, 22:01
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,911
Groaned at 45 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 982 Times in 657 Posts
blackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeableblackbird is considered knowledgeable
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

both.
I think i don't loose much time , when i recon my average speed is going down, then i am going stop, have a big slurp and start over.
I think the important thing in cycling is having an high average speed.
Safety is an issue , too.
Reply With Quote
  #219  
Old 19.07.2010, 11:29
AntH's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Baden
Posts: 187
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 100 Times in 46 Posts
AntH has earned the respect of manyAntH has earned the respect of manyAntH has earned the respect of many
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Hi guys,

Another question for you all. For some reason I decided today to have alook online to see how much the tyres on my bike cost. Turns out expensive..... But whilst looking I read reviews claiming that after around 1000 - 1250 km they will need to be changed as they will be worn out. I want to avoid forking out lots of money on new tyres untill I have to so I was just wondering

How do I tell that I need new tyres?

The reason I ask now is that I am close to the magic numbers mentioned above
__________________
Well spank my ass and call me Charlie!
Reply With Quote
  #220  
Old 20.07.2010, 11:30
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Basel
Posts: 81
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 48 Times in 30 Posts
Patuleko is considered knowledgeablePatuleko is considered knowledgeablePatuleko is considered knowledgeable
Re: Cycling in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Hello,
I've been reading posts about some of the amazing cycling tours taken by my fellow EF'ers and I've decided to join in the fun. This is what I have in mind:
Start in Basel and ride about 166 km the first day to Walenstadt (southeast of Zurich) which is a little long but very doable without any mountain passes and with a nice lunch break. The next day would be a bit easier from Walenstadt to Thusis which should be a fairly easy 70 km, and the last day would be another 70 km to St. Moritz via Bergün over the Albula pass and a train back to Basel.
I'm thinking having a longer first day will give me more time for sightseeing once I get to the mountains, and I won't hit the big pass with heavy legs. I like to think I am a fairly decent cyclist with multiple Ironmans under my belt but I've never done a multiple day tour so I think this will be a challenge for me. I also like the idea of seeing the Southeast part of Switzerland for the first time.
I do have a few questions for the more experienced folks:

1. Any experience along this route? (re: traffic/road conditions?)

2. I would prefer to use my road bike with a small backpack but have an option of putting slicks on my hardtail 29er. Which one would be more suitable?

3. Would anyone want to join me? I'm thinking either next month or sometime in late August.

Before anyone agrees to join I'll just say that once I hit anything around 7% grade or steeper my average speed drops to embarrasing levels (I'm 1.92 mts and 98 kg) so you may be riding solo for a good bit of the pass with me suffering off the back...

Thanks for the input,
Carlos
Hello all,
I finally got to do my ride this past weekend after having to cancel in late June due to snow at the Albula pass.
Overall the ride was incredible! This was my first Alpine pass and now I can't wait to do more! I highly recommend the ride from Tiefencastel. The scenery is incredible (including the Rhaetian Railway train), and I even got to see teams HTC Columbia, Lotto, and Cervelo Test (support cars and all) on training rides climbing the pass from the south side! I found the grade fairly comfortable with the steepest section of the 31 km climb at kms 14-18 before Bergün. The road bike with a double crank and a seatpost rack (about 6 kgs) was no problem.
Followed posted bike routes for the most part and I enjoyed going a little "Paris-Roubaix" on the unpaved sections, but I did tear up my tires quite a bit. I need to put some serious thought into getting a cross bike!
Cheers,
Carlos
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Patuleko for this useful post:
Reply

Tags
cycling advocacy, maintenance, maps, mountain biking, mtb, pro cycling, rental, road biking, sticky thread, touring




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cycling in the UK ip2012 General off-topic 8 30.08.2010 20:12
Cycling tour of Switzerland Midas Travel/day trips/free time 3 15.06.2010 21:51
SA from London new to Switzerland! Fishing, cycling and rugby! gats Introductions 5 16.04.2010 19:38
Cycling - Training Rides in Switzerland crossifino Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 2 22.02.2010 09:14
Greetings Cycling Switzerland Mondrian Introductions 0 14.02.2010 15:12


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:59.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0