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Old 15.12.2016, 14:28
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Swiss Sign language

The SGB-FSS is the swiss organization helping deaf-mute people have an easier life in this country. It's funded by donations and some funding from federal government. They also define new "words" in sign language....it's a community driven decision process. This year they added more than 200 signs.
Try to guess the following sign
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  #2  
Old 15.12.2016, 14:41
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Re: Swiss Sign language

Looks a bit like Hat.. hm.. Hang onto your hat?! Talking through one's hat..

Ah.. ok.. checked the link.. wasn't far off :P
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Old 15.12.2016, 14:41
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Re: Swiss Sign language

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The SGB-FSS is the swiss organization helping deaf-mute people have an easier life in this country. It's funded by donations and some funding from federal government. They also define new "words" in sign language....it's a community driven decision process. This year they added more than 200 signs.
Try to guess the following sign
Slaphead
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Old 15.12.2016, 14:43
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Re: Swiss Sign language

I have no clue. Doesn't it also depend on the movement rather than just the position?
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Old 15.12.2016, 15:23
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Re: Swiss Sign language

Donald Trump
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Old 16.12.2016, 11:10
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Re: Swiss Sign language

Trump chosen as ‘sign of the year’ by Swiss deaf society
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Old 27.05.2020, 17:04
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Re: Swiss Sign language

I watched the press conference today. Two translators shared the job of translating into sign language.
I wondered in what language did they sign?
Or actually - as it would make sense to me - is there one sign language world wide?

If so, it sure would make sense to learn it and overcome language barriers once and for all.
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Old 27.05.2020, 17:09
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Re: Swiss Sign language

Every language has its sign language version.
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Old 27.05.2020, 17:49
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Re: Swiss Sign language

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If so, it sure would make sense to learn it and overcome language barriers once and for all.
Sort of like Esperanto for intellectuals?
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Old 27.05.2020, 19:04
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Re: Swiss Sign language

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I watched the press conference today. Two translators shared the job of translating into sign language.
I wondered in what language did they sign?
Or actually - as it would make sense to me - is there one sign language world wide?

If so, it sure would make sense to learn it and overcome language barriers once and for all.
Actually, it's really fascinating, there are loads and loads of sign language and they are constantly evolving just like in spoken languages. There are are dialects and everything.
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Old 27.05.2020, 20:38
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Re: Swiss Sign language

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Sort of like Esperanto for intellectuals?
No, this would be the Esperanto for everybody.
Too bad they missed this chance.

Thanks for the replies.

Now I still wonder, what language the ones on the press conference used (three language groups still missed out then).
EastEnders, did you watch it? Can you tell me?
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Old 29.05.2020, 22:15
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Re: Swiss Sign language

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Actually, it's really fascinating, there are loads and loads of sign language and they are constantly evolving just like in spoken languages. There are are dialects and everything.
In Australia the main sign language is Auslan ... which is also known by at least some people in Japan (a mate of mine met a Japanese scout at a Jamboree, and they communicated in Auslan the whole time). There are several sign languages among the indigenous Australian nations, which are unrelated to Auslan and growing and developing as you said, and some of them have incorporated signs from Auslan. There are also some dialects of Auslan around the country ... two main ones (north and south) and then a few regional variations.

I did a few courses in Auslan when I lived in Sydney. The introductory course was delivered by a person who knew Auslan and could hear & speak English, the other levels were delivered by deaf people, completely in Auslan.
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Old 29.05.2020, 23:09
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Re: Swiss Sign language

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Every language has its sign language version.

This is not 'strictly' true - Auslan (Australian sign language) is not signed English... neither is ASL (American Sign Language).


There is signed English, but it's not the same. ASL shares quite a few signs with signed english. Actually signed English is not a proper 'sign language' - it's a strategy for translating English.



Many sign languages developed within specific deaf communities - often deaf schools or institutions where deaf people lived often in isolation from the wider community. There used to be very little contact between deaf people in one area or another. And a lot of deaf people were never given the opportunity to learn sign language (or it was discouraged actively - I know someone who was told not to teach her two deaf children who had cochlear implants to sign, and not to mix them with other deaf people... on the belief that it would 'force' them to learn to speak.... the two children just made up their own... and had profound communication problems...



It's a passion of mine - having met a group of deaf kids from a special high school class when I was about 16. They were one class within a regular school - they could all sign. Some could lipread or hear and speak enough to be understood, and when there was confusion, the others helped interpret.


There was also a boy there who was the same age with a cochlear implant. He had never gone to deaf school. He could not sign. He wanted to talk to me - he could not speak well - actually the deaf kids who could sign were better at communicating because they could help each other, signing with each other, then one girl who was particularly friendly and outgoing, was able to speak clearly enough for me to understand and she was their 'interpreter' - the guy with the cochlear implant was stuck - not really able to hear or speak clearly, and not able to sign with the other kids... it impacted me greatly... as he really wanted to be understood, but neither I (the hearing non-signing person) or the other kids (deaf and signing) could understand him. they tried.. I really felt this kids isolation deeply...
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Old 02.06.2020, 12:02
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Re: Swiss Sign language

Modern sign language has its origins in Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, after whom Gallaudet University in Washington DC is named.

As others have said, sign languages are specific to language cultures and to region. British Sign Language is indecipherable to signers of American Sign Language. There are some who sign both fluently: a (then) 9-y.o. Filipiina was at my home a few years ago and she had learned ASL (or the Philippine dialect if that's what it is) in Manila and BSL in London. A bit of Internet research will show you there are professional interpreters who can interpret between the two, as would be needed, say, in a courtroom of the other country.

It's for good reason that Quebec sign language differs both from Canadian SL and French SL. And there are historical reasons why French SL is similar to ASL. Perhaps most of the world's sign languages were brought to countries by American missionaries, explaining the influence ASL has had.

I recall looking up the question of the difference between Swiss French and Swiss German SL. That could be expected given cross-fertilisation within the Germanic and Francophone communities.

The Deaf Community is divided about cochlear implants and the insularity of that community. Becoming a native "speaker" of sign language is comparable to becoming a native speaker of any language: unless one happens to be a gifted polyglot (search engine: <nytimes polyglot>) it's only those who learn at a young age, before 5 and certainly before puberty, who become close to native fluent. A couple of years ago I read in WaPo that the president of Gallaudet University was not respected by many students because she was a late learner of ASL and thus "clearly not one of them".

Over the century sign languages have been victims of political prejudices that have caused educators at certain times and places to hinder children from learning and using it -- much as Indian schools in America once punished children for speaking their native languages. Parents were often convinced a child was best off being forced to lip-read and speak. Hardly different in my view from the early 20th Century state laws against teaching elementary-age children "foreign" languages of any kind. The Supreme Court threw out such laws: Meyer v. Nebraska, 262 U.S. 390 (1923); Bartels v. Iowa, 262 U.S. 404 (1923).

Hope I got all of that right. It's an issue I've been following around the world for years, and I've collected a pile of books that I've yet to do more than leaf through.

Last edited by Caryl; 02.06.2020 at 12:12.
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