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  #101  
Old 03.11.2010, 00:33
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Woohoo! I can post on a closed thread!
Argh - forgot to actually close it. What can I say - it's late....

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I imagine some debate going on is some bedroom in Switzerland.
Nope, and I resent the suggestion.
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  #102  
Old 03.11.2010, 08:08
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

Take 2 ...

Let's keep to the topic: Swissier than the Swiss?
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  #103  
Old 03.11.2010, 08:26
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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So, where were we?

Oh yes... naturalised Swiss who think they know more about Switzerland than the indigenous population...
Actually it's somehow true. Let me explain: we are towards the end of our naturalization process. For that purpose we bought a quizz game called HelvetIQ because we need to know a few things for the different interviews. We read also a lot about the history and political system. We invited once our swiss neighbours for an apero and decided to play the game HelvetIQ. Needless to say that we won and that many of our swiss neighbours were not able to answer some of the "obvious" questions

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Take 2 ...

Let's keep to the topic: Swissier than the Swiss?
This is human reaction everytime a change/conversion process takes place. To show that you really deserve to be the member of that new community you push it to the extreme and become more "radical". It's also well known that many segundos vote for the SVP/UDC. It's a way to say: hey I am like you, we are in the same community. This reaction has been seen as well in other countries and among people who convert to a religion (become more rigorist than the average guy).
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  #104  
Old 03.11.2010, 08:41
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

I don't know, maybe I am just lucky that I have decent normal conversations with that group of people,
where we, at times, laugh our heads off or get mad about the Swiss way of doing things
but are also almost painfully aware that we are a privileged lot nonetheless to live in a place like Switzerland.

Sometimes it really does feel like coming back to a safe and cosy place you know.

So no, nobody's gotten on my nerves so far, except on here of course, because, yes, sometimes people really do push it a little.

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This is a question for native-born Swiss, whether they are resident here or not:

When you hear someone who has acquired Swiss nationality later in life banging on about Switzerland and the rights of "the Swiss" and Swiss culture and how Switzerland is better than anywhere else in the world and so on (sometimes ad nauseam), how do you feel?

Are you proud that they care so much about their adopted country, or do they get on your nerves?

Examples welcome.
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  #105  
Old 03.11.2010, 09:52
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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This is a question for native-born Swiss, whether they are resident here or not:

When you hear someone who has acquired Swiss nationality later in life banging on about Switzerland and the rights of "the Swiss" and Swiss culture and how Switzerland is better than anywhere else in the world and so on (sometimes ad nauseam), how do you feel?

Are you proud that they care so much about their adopted country, or do they get on your nerves?
I am not a Swiss native-born,(and now I am not even in the CH,not even in the same continent!!!)but I may fit the later description somewhere later in my life,so with respect to my dreams I cant help but add to this gossip.

As a Human being with an unbiased thinking I can analyze that:

Swiss natives who thinks "they do get on my nerves!!!"-are being very Possessive about their place of birth,
Love it or hate it,the idea is they are the most fortunate ones to be born into the Swiss country and being possessive is absolutely permissible.
But question is.......are they open to acknowledge the respect that a Non native has for their native land of CH ????

And for Swiss natives who are "proud that they care so much about their adopted country" -they are the ones who stands to welcome all and any person to their paradise generously.They take pride in being Swiss natives and are respected for their generosity-because they are the people who would represent the beauty and the bliss of the CH to the world.

Of-course,besides the above way of seeing things,there maybe negative deviations,such as,
A non-Swiss native keeps on going in such a way about the CH,that a Swiss native or any Human for that matter can clearly realize that its all flattery and no real respect.......only facts and figures and history and geography which would feel real cold(to the extent of throwing up),fine they are knowledge.....is it coming from the mind ??? or from the heart ???? Is the wisdom and knowledge understood or is it just mugged up to flatter ?????

While on the other hand,a few Swiss natives may find it difficult to accept some other national fitting into Swiss way of life pretty fast.It would seem to such Swiss natives that these foreigners are going overboard to prove that how much they care and respect CH.........but the fact is.....the foriegn national may have genuine feelings about CH and he/she has done difficult things to make their feelings prove real.

I would say,a wise person would and can always tell a warm genuine feeling from a cold flattery.........
and being Swissier than the Swiss is an apt title for cold flattery







P.S.
My post above is not meant to hurt anyone's feelings or beliefs,its just my general realization I am talking about.I would be extremely Sorry if my words above seems rude to any person,Swiss or Non-Swiss.
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  #106  
Old 03.11.2010, 11:13
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

If only someone could have intervened during last night's posting...

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  #107  
Old 03.11.2010, 12:39
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

Yes, nationalism is silly and dangerous - except during the World Cup ;-)

The only person I've heard do that is SVP ranter and general political annoyance Christoph Blocher, who's family would be considered "fremde Fötzel" (nasty foreigners) by some old-time Swiss, given that his family came from Germany as "recently" as 1861 - just shows his hysteria about "true citizens" and foreigners is all just opportunism in his endless grab for power.
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  #108  
Old 03.11.2010, 15:40
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

Hmm...I think thankfully, there are so many things here that make it too easy to fall for, to like, be happy about. There are things that really irk, too, and I can imagine one does not forget them just because you get that little red book all of a sudden. But it must be fun to laugh about these things with locals, since I am 100% positive, that behind that rigid "I love everything about my country" attitude that is requested here from locals, there is a pretty big dose of humility, common sense and critical thinking. At least that's what my experience is. I am not Swiss but do hear I push it sometimes too much, just like people do here, and apparently I have always done it.. Well, maybe this place will make me less Swiss.
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  #109  
Old 03.11.2010, 22:10
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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I don't suppose you feel any less Swiss for doing that, do you?
I did never feel particularly "Swiss" but what I did feel was that after around 58 weeks (more than 400 days) of military service (within 22 years), enough was enough, and that I could nicely do WITHOUT that "Zivildienst". I in fact by error missed a particular date, then I called them and told them they could give me a new date, what they never did as they apparently felt they could equally well do without me, a notion I was not opposed to
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  #110  
Old 03.11.2010, 22:32
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

Not sure where I stand on this. I've done the Basel Fasnacht bit and do my best to get along with the natives - trying to out-Swiss the locals.

But, after a visit to the UK this weekend and having enjoyed the casual and spontaneous friendliness of the natives there, I think I'd rather be a good Englishman than a rubbish Swiss.

Cheers,
Nick
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  #111  
Old 03.11.2010, 22:52
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Not sure where I stand on this. I've done the Basel Fasnacht bit and do my best to get along with the natives - trying to out-Swiss the locals.

But, after a visit to the UK this weekend and having enjoyed the casual and spontaneous friendliness of the natives there, I think I'd rather be a good Englishman than a rubbish Swiss.

Cheers,
Nick
I agree. But that's just being naturally partial. That's normal. I think one cannot really be fondly partial for two places...The whole nostalgia thing, childhood, smells, tastes, noises and familiar smiles.

I wonder if being partial not because we have that warm fuzzy childhood feeling is just fake sentimentality..? Because we want to make up for the fact we haven't grown up here and lack those long time memories of here? I know, pointless speculations...but I get sentimental about old timey things here, too.
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  #112  
Old 03.11.2010, 23:13
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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I agree. But that's just being naturally partial. That's normal. I think one cannot really be fondly partial for two places...The whole nostalgia thing, childhood, smells, tastes, noises and familiar smiles.

I wonder if being partial not because we have that warm fuzzy childhood feeling is just fake sentimentality..? Because we want to make up for the fact we haven't grown up here and lack those long time memories of here? I know, pointless speculations...but I get sentimental about old timey things here, too.
Hmmm... I don't know. When I go to Greece - indeed, even when I first went to Greece! - it feels like going home. And, of course, when I go to England it feels like going home. And just to really confuse things, I feel really at home in Switzerland, too (this week!). The sound of the alphorn makes me cry, the sight of the Grossmunster lit up at night reminds me how much I love Zurich, the discovery of a map of the old shoreline of the lake gets me as excited as discovering a map of the bell pits in my home village in England.

It is unlikely that I will ever apply for Swiss citizenship. The reality of modern Europe, with the bilateral treaties and Schengen and all, means that it probably will never be worth it, although I shall certainly encourage our children (should we have any) to apply, as they will have been born and brought up here, and its nice to have an official link to the place one has always known. But should I ever change my mind on that issue, I can't imagine myself becoming a gung-ho, Switzerland-right-or-wrong nationalist. One can love a country without being convinced that it is perfect - after all, I love Greece passionately, yet think it's one of the most buggered up countries I've ever visited!

I would also find it embarrassing to find myself more patriotic (or nationalistic) than those who have Switzerland coursing through their veins and their hearts. It would be somewhat presumptuous to even think I had a right to be so. Indeed, while I never differentiated between native-born British citizens and those who acquired their nationality later in life, I still found it irritating when naturalised Brits of my acquaintance would make rude comments about immigrants to Britain. "I'm English through and through, going back to at least the middle of the eighteenth century," I would think, "and I'm not so jingoistic. What right, therefore, do you have to be?"

Being a naturalised nationalist is like climbing into a tree house, drawing up the ladder and bossing the kids around who were already there before you arrived because they refuse to throw apples at the kids underneath.

Some people are shameless in that way. I'm not, and hope I would never be.
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  #113  
Old 03.11.2010, 23:24
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Hmmm... I don't know. When I go to Greece - indeed, even when I first went to Greece! - it feels like going home. And, of course, when I go to England it feels like going home. And just to really confuse things, I feel really at home in Switzerland, too (this week!). The sound of the alphorn makes me cry, the sight of the Grossmunster lit up at night reminds me how much I love Zurich, the discovery of a map of the old shoreline of the lake gets me as excited as discovering a map of the bell pits in my home village in England.

It is unlikely that I will ever apply for Swiss citizenship. The reality of modern Europe, with the bilateral treaties and Schengen and all, means that it probably will never be worth it, although I shall certainly encourage our children (should we have any) to apply, as they will have been born and brought up here, and its nice to have an official link to the place one has always known. But should I ever change my mind on that issue, I can't imagine myself becoming a gung-ho, Switzerland-right-or-wrong nationalist. One can love a country without being convinced that it is perfect - after all, I love Greece passionately, yet think it's one of the most buggered up countries I've ever visited!

I would also find it embarrassing to find myself more patriotic (or nationalistic) than those who have Switzerland coursing through their veins and their hearts. It would be somewhat presumptuous to even think I had a right to be so. Indeed, while I never differentiated between native-born British citizens and those who acquired their nationality later in life, I still found it irritating when naturalised Brits of my acquaintance would make rude comments about immigrants to Britain. "I'm English through and through, going back to at least the middle of the eighteenth century," I would think, "and I'm not so jingoistic. What right, therefore, do you have to be?"

Being a naturalised nationalist is like climbing into a tree house, drawing up the ladder and bossing the kids around who were already there before you arrived because they refuse to throw apples at the kids underneath.

Some people are shameless in that way. I'm not, and hope I would never be.
I agree. Although I have lived many places, and loved many places, and got many fuzzy feelings, it was not home home. The breezy, green, goulash and beer smelling, weird cement commie panel buldings, and warm folks, it was never that childhood returning chill...

I understand you dislike the cockiness. Nationalism sucks, no matter who owns it, old or newcomers. Can you picture, though, how easy it would be - just simply accept one land as ultimately perfect heaven with everything that comes with it? The never ending dilema would be gone. My mind would finally find peace, using one sole point of reference. No more debates, doubts, criticism, nitpicking and questioning...I don't blame people who's psyche ends up with this comfortable shortcut. They wear it as a batch of honor. Somewhat born again, cult-ish.

Some cultures do though push for perfectionism, and people give in. They have to feel their new motherland is perfect since they do not allow it not to be and just simply happily live with it. Perfectionism is looked down upon, in many places...Unreal.
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  #114  
Old 03.11.2010, 23:33
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Somewhat born again, cult-ish.
Nail on the head!

It sometimes looks like a kind of desperation. We all want certainty in our lives, but few of us ever get any. Becoming a fierce supporter of one's adopted country gives one a kind of purpose, gives one a refuge, gives one certainty.

It would be pitiful if it wasn't so human.

Perhaps rather than mocking these neo-helvetes, we should be sympathetic and tolerant towards them. After all, if we take away their Swiss passports, what will they have?

It would be cruel to knock the crutches from a cripple.
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  #115  
Old 03.11.2010, 23:55
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Nail on the head!

It sometimes looks like a kind of desperation. We all want certainty in our lives, but few of us ever get any. Becoming a fierce supporter of one's adopted country gives one a kind of purpose, gives one a refuge, gives one certainty.

It would be pitiful if it wasn't so human.

Perhaps rather than mocking these neo-helvetes, we should be sympathetic and tolerant towards them. After all, if we take away their Swiss passports, what will they have?

It would be cruel to knock the crutches from a cripple.
Meanie

Well, people ask for it.



I get cocky, we all do. When you think about it, just to play devil's advocat, the way people super accept their new identity, we, on the other hand opose it so vehemently it also does not make sense at times....you know? As if with admiting how fantastic this place can be (and I am not saying it always is, under any condition), we are giving away our old identity, our home and love for it, so we hang on to it (hence me and my irritating in good ol' soviet home spiels...) with such verve it does shed off to our completely biased opinion of this place. In somewhat anti-cultish manner.

So, what do we have? A cult-ish more than swiss camp, and anti-cult ish we are better than that camp, hahaha...

Group hug and we will have a drink to it next event, fo sho. I do enjoy these strange debates, though, when even the most newborn fresh knighted people take great care of explaining things, since it is true that locals sometimes do not give their land so much credit, the new citizens observe and verbalize things well...explain, point out, etc. It might rub in, but they might be equally humble about it, we might just perceive the crutch? Duno. I am hopeless idealist sometimes. When I was home if expats asked me to explain things I wouldn't really pinpoint it so well, as oppose to now, when I miss it, can day dream about it and would probably verbalize opinion much better than if I was actually there...
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  #116  
Old 04.11.2010, 00:10
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Hmm...I think thankfully, there are so many things here that make it too easy to fall for, to like, be happy about. There are things that really irk, too, and I can imagine one does not forget them just because you get that little red book all of a sudden. But it must be fun to laugh about these things with locals, since I am 100% positive, that behind that rigid "I love everything about my country" attitude that is requested here from locals, there is a pretty big dose of humility, common sense and critical thinking. At least that's what my experience is. I am not Swiss but do hear I push it sometimes too much, just like people do here, and apparently I have always done it.. Well, maybe this place will make me less Swiss.

I'd be careful about wanting that little red book, because you might just get one. It comes with a hidden charge. I'll try to explain.

I got mine reluctantly. I actually did not want it, but because my family is Swiss, it simplified a number of things, so I ended up getting one. Thinking it was just "a piece of paper", it turned out that possesion of the little read book had some real psychological effects.

When I first arrived here, I was gung-ho about the place. I think I visited every tourist spot within a day's drive from me. But after the newness of it wore off, I got bored. But this boredom did not wear off. It lasted for months, maybe years. In many ways, I'm still bored. I enrolled in a German course and befriended a Turk, a Nigerian, an Afghan, and an Albanian. We could barely communicate with each other, but we had a number of things in common; coffee, cigarettes and our perception of the local Swiss. We would get a table in a cafe or restaurant, and the Swiss waitresses often ignored us. Or when they came, they spoke rudely and had a bad attitude. The thing is, I have never been treated like this in my life. My first impulse was to tell her to get her manager. But then, I couldn't even speak Swiss german. I started to take notice of this vibe everywhere - at the market, in the shops, at the post office. Everywhere were SVP posters of colored hands grabbing at passports. I thought, "What a living hell this place turned out to be, and I gotta get out of here." I HATED Switzerland and I HATED the Swiss. I conclude Helvetia was named after Helvete, the Swedish word for Hell.

This depressed me. For I while, I could barely tolerate it. It was then that I received my little red book, but thought very little of it. After a while, I got bored of being bored and depressed. It dawned on me that I didn't need to be in this state. I realized that with my Swiss citizenship, I am on equal footing as those "zombies". So I said, "F*** it!" I'm going to be who I am. When I experienced rudeness, I threw it right back at them. When I wanted something, I demanded it. I argued back. Then somehow or another, they became less and less rude. But I realize it was all because my level of confidence increased.

My intention was to revolutionize this place. At work and in social situations, I try to bring in new approaches, ideas and energy. I always offer other ways of looking at and doing things differently. I find the young Swiss are quite receptive. They express interest in where I come from, and dream of going there. At work, while they gather in little committees to consternate over little details, I would just attack problems and solve them.

But the little red book goes deeper than I thought. You see, while the little red book puts Switzerland in your hands, it comes with a hidden charge - a responsibility to take care of Switzerland. This country is structured in that you have to constantly be mindful of keeping your shit together. If you don't, you pay. So in the course of being more responsible, I actually started to care. And this must be the downfall - this is where the Swissiness kicks in.

This is the environment I chose for my kids, and I feel a responsibility to help preserve this place for their generation. I am more mindful of values that will lead to this objective, and values that would eat away at it. Gradually, I found myself seeing things more from a Swiss perspective, even the SVP.

Now, do I go around making bad impersonations of Swiss people to flatter them? Hell no. I think yodelling is for dogs, and I still doze off when I hear Swiss german. But do I think Switzerland is a special place? Yes. There are very few places in the world like this, especially in this day and age. I LOVE Switzerland. I may hate a LOT of things about it, but I LOVE it in a way that I would do what I can to take care of it.
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Old 04.11.2010, 02:02
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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I'd be careful about wanting that little red book, because you might just get one. It comes with a hidden charge. I'll try to explain.

I got mine reluctantly. I actually did not want it, but because my family is Swiss, it simplified a number of things, so I ended up getting one. Thinking it was just "a piece of paper", it turned out that possesion of the little read book had some real psychological effects.

When I first arrived here, I was gung-ho about the place. I think I visited every tourist spot within a day's drive from me. But after the newness of it wore off, I got bored. But this boredom did not wear off. It lasted for months, maybe years. In many ways, I'm still bored. I enrolled in a German course and befriended a Turk, a Nigerian, an Afghan, and an Albanian. We could barely communicate with each other, but we had a number of things in common; coffee, cigarettes and our perception of the local Swiss. We would get a table in a cafe or restaurant, and the Swiss waitresses often ignored us. Or when they came, they spoke rudely and had a bad attitude. The thing is, I have never been treated like this in my life. My first impulse was to tell her to get her manager. But then, I couldn't even speak Swiss german. I started to take notice of this vibe everywhere - at the market, in the shops, at the post office. Everywhere were SVP posters of colored hands grabbing at passports. I thought, "What a living hell this place turned out to be, and I gotta get out of here." I HATED Switzerland and I HATED the Swiss. I conclude Helvetia was named after Helvete, the Swedish word for Hell.

This depressed me. For I while, I could barely tolerate it. It was then that I received my little red book, but thought very little of it. After a while, I got bored of being bored and depressed. It dawned on me that I didn't need to be in this state. I realized that with my Swiss citizenship, I am on equal footing as those "zombies". So I said, "F*** it!" I'm going to be who I am. When I experienced rudeness, I threw it right back at them. When I wanted something, I demanded it. I argued back. Then somehow or another, they became less and less rude. But I realize it was all because my level of confidence increased.

My intention was to revolutionize this place. At work and in social situations, I try to bring in new approaches, ideas and energy. I always offer other ways of looking at and doing things differently. I find the young Swiss are quite receptive. They express interest in where I come from, and dream of going there. At work, while they gather in little committees to consternate over little details, I would just attack problems and solve them.

But the little red book goes deeper than I thought. You see, while the little red book puts Switzerland in your hands, it comes with a hidden charge - a responsibility to take care of Switzerland. This country is structured in that you have to constantly be mindful of keeping your shit together. If you don't, you pay. So in the course of being more responsible, I actually started to care. And this must be the downfall - this is where the Swissiness kicks in.

This is the environment I chose for my kids, and I feel a responsibility to help preserve this place for their generation. I am more mindful of values that will lead to this objective, and values that would eat away at it. Gradually, I found myself seeing things more from a Swiss perspective, even the SVP.

Now, do I go around making bad impersonations of Swiss people to flatter them? Hell no. I think yodelling is for dogs, and I still doze off when I hear Swiss german. But do I think Switzerland is a special place? Yes. There are very few places in the world like this, especially in this day and age. I LOVE Switzerland. I may hate a LOT of things about it, but I LOVE it in a way that I would do what I can to take care of it.

Just to disappoint you. A majority of Swiss people do NOT even own such a CH passport, but what the own is a paper of showing their citizenship of the "Gemeinde" in question, and for travelling purposes the "Identitätskarte"

which is THE travelling document in use in 97% of all travels of Swiss people. The use of the CH passport is just SVP propaganda
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  #118  
Old 04.11.2010, 07:15
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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I'd be careful about wanting that little red book, because you might just get one. It comes with a hidden charge. I'll try to explain.

I got mine reluctantly. I actually did not want it, but because my family is Swiss, it simplified a number of things, so I ended up getting one. Thinking it was just "a piece of paper", it turned out that possesion of the little read book had some real psychological effects.

When I first arrived here, I was gung-ho about the place. I think I visited every tourist spot within a day's drive from me. But after the newness of it wore off, I got bored. But this boredom did not wear off. It lasted for months, maybe years. In many ways, I'm still bored. I enrolled in a German course and befriended a Turk, a Nigerian, an Afghan, and an Albanian. We could barely communicate with each other, but we had a number of things in common; coffee, cigarettes and our perception of the local Swiss. We would get a table in a cafe or restaurant, and the Swiss waitresses often ignored us. Or when they came, they spoke rudely and had a bad attitude. The thing is, I have never been treated like this in my life. My first impulse was to tell her to get her manager. But then, I couldn't even speak Swiss german. I started to take notice of this vibe everywhere - at the market, in the shops, at the post office. Everywhere were SVP posters of colored hands grabbing at passports. I thought, "What a living hell this place turned out to be, and I gotta get out of here." I HATED Switzerland and I HATED the Swiss. I conclude Helvetia was named after Helvete, the Swedish word for Hell.

This depressed me. For I while, I could barely tolerate it. It was then that I received my little red book, but thought very little of it. After a while, I got bored of being bored and depressed. It dawned on me that I didn't need to be in this state. I realized that with my Swiss citizenship, I am on equal footing as those "zombies". So I said, "F*** it!" I'm going to be who I am. When I experienced rudeness, I threw it right back at them. When I wanted something, I demanded it. I argued back. Then somehow or another, they became less and less rude. But I realize it was all because my level of confidence increased.

My intention was to revolutionize this place. At work and in social situations, I try to bring in new approaches, ideas and energy. I always offer other ways of looking at and doing things differently. I find the young Swiss are quite receptive. They express interest in where I come from, and dream of going there. At work, while they gather in little committees to consternate over little details, I would just attack problems and solve them.

But the little red book goes deeper than I thought. You see, while the little red book puts Switzerland in your hands, it comes with a hidden charge - a responsibility to take care of Switzerland. This country is structured in that you have to constantly be mindful of keeping your shit together. If you don't, you pay. So in the course of being more responsible, I actually started to care. And this must be the downfall - this is where the Swissiness kicks in.

This is the environment I chose for my kids, and I feel a responsibility to help preserve this place for their generation. I am more mindful of values that will lead to this objective, and values that would eat away at it. Gradually, I found myself seeing things more from a Swiss perspective, even the SVP.

Now, do I go around making bad impersonations of Swiss people to flatter them? Hell no. I think yodelling is for dogs, and I still doze off when I hear Swiss german. But do I think Switzerland is a special place? Yes. There are very few places in the world like this, especially in this day and age. I LOVE Switzerland. I may hate a LOT of things about it, but I LOVE it in a way that I would do what I can to take care of it.
Great post! Its easy to have a love-hate relationship with Switzerland, I decided to love it more, have more understanding of thier culture and the way they think. Understanding works wonders. You don't have to become "like them" but you know how to get along with them. Being a citizen of a country does come with some responsiblities and all of them are not outer ones, but inner ones too. I am a citizen of a country, and I have all the rights in that country, with the freedom to come and go as I please without restriction.(no permit limits etc) I act like I have those freedoms too. The Swiss don't scare me. Once you understand something, you lose the fear of it.(or antagonism towards it) It also helps that its at the top of the list for one of the best countries in the world to live. Its great!...maybe I will collect a couple more passports...LOL...just kidding
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  #119  
Old 04.11.2010, 08:14
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Not sure where I stand on this. I've done the Basel Fasnacht bit and do my best to get along with the natives - trying to out-Swiss the locals.

But, after a visit to the UK this weekend and having enjoyed the casual and spontaneous friendliness of the natives there, I think I'd rather be a good Englishman than a rubbish Swiss.

Cheers,
Nick
Spontaneous friendliness is not exactly the impression I on numerous visits to England felt to be around the natives. Unless you speak about people of Indian/Pakistani or Arab origin
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Old 04.11.2010, 10:08
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Re: Swissier than the Swiss?

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Spontaneous friendliness is not exactly the impression I on numerous visits to England felt to be around the natives.
How much time did you spend in the Midlands and North, just out of curiosity?
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