Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Transportation/driving  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 19.05.2011, 23:36
Krazy8s's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Aegeri
Posts: 54
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 11 Times in 7 Posts
Krazy8s has no particular reputation at present
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
Migros M-Budget bike. ........

The chain seem to grate/rattle a bit as if not in gear properly and at one point it fell off the gear altogether and jammed and I had to spend a few minutes putting the chain back on.
Why does it not surprise me that the chain issue follows the words "Migros M-Budget bike"......
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Krazy8s for this useful post:
  #42  
Old 20.05.2011, 08:08
BasP72's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Adliswil (close to Zurich)
Posts: 1,932
Groaned at 89 Times in 43 Posts
Thanked 1,785 Times in 852 Posts
BasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
thanks. i was originally going to look for a fixed gear bike to avoid this kind of hassle...
I always buy the cheaper Shimano stuff (Alivio) and it has never given me any problems (and I run this stuff way past its 4000km designed lifetime, you're a cheap Dutchman or you're not ). You just need to know how to properly adjust it.

http://www.veloplus.ch/service/fachi...?fk_GruppeID=6
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 20.05.2011, 11:37
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,881
Groaned at 78 Times in 57 Posts
Thanked 4,140 Times in 2,236 Posts
rainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
I always buy the cheaper Shimano stuff (Alivio) and it has never given me any problems (and I run this stuff way past its 4000km designed lifetime, you're a cheap Dutchman or you're not ). You just need to know how to properly adjust it.

http://www.veloplus.ch/service/fachi...?fk_GruppeID=6

That may well work in the Netherlands, were the landscape is essentially flat.
And it may also work sort-of-well in Switzerland, if you never put a lot of power on it (i.e. push it up the hills).
But in the end, the Alivio and related low(est) end stuff is just not made for any kind of more than casual use: it will wear down very quickly and end in a costly repair.

I hope the bike was returned swiftly to SportX after the gears showed some problems and the chain came off so easily.
A new bike should work. Regardless of the price.
Would you (the OP) also buy and wear shoes that don't fit and make your feet hurt?
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank rainer_d for this useful post:
  #44  
Old 20.05.2011, 11:45
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Vaud
Posts: 4,518
Groaned at 491 Times in 320 Posts
Thanked 4,099 Times in 1,952 Posts
CorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
I always buy the cheaper Shimano stuff (Alivio) and it has never given me any problems (and I run this stuff way past its 4000km designed lifetime, you're a cheap Dutchman or you're not ). You just need to know how to properly adjust it.

http://www.veloplus.ch/service/fachi...?fk_GruppeID=6
I once bought a cheap bike and I had the same issue: chain completely blocked, exploded (the rear turning thing blocked itself). Ended up falling tearing jeans, etc... Shop refunded me + gave vouchers. The staff was open and admitted everyone return those bikes.

Then I paid a 250pounds bike, from a bike shop: good enough.

The frame got cut 1 year after but the staff were very surprise they never seen that and completely replaced the bike for free.

The replacement bike lasted 2 years with no issue.


In my opinion very cheap bike is NO, stay away from there.
Small price bike are ok.
"expensive bikes" (1000gbp +) are really for rich enthusiasts or pros.

By the way remember cheap or not cheap a bike needs BASIC maintenance regularly!!!.
You'll have the clean; lube, etc... quite often or your fancy bike will turn into crap.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 20.05.2011, 11:55
Carlos R's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Roundn'about Basel
Posts: 7,231
Groaned at 105 Times in 95 Posts
Thanked 9,934 Times in 4,178 Posts
Carlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
I am now the proud owner of a Migros M-Budget bike. Sadly it is black in colour and not the stripey white and green.
So you completely ignored all the advice given then...
Reply With Quote
The following 6 users would like to thank Carlos R for this useful post:
  #46  
Old 20.05.2011, 12:12
BasP72's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Adliswil (close to Zurich)
Posts: 1,932
Groaned at 89 Times in 43 Posts
Thanked 1,785 Times in 852 Posts
BasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
That may well work in the Netherlands, were the landscape is essentially flat.
And it may also work sort-of-well in Switzerland, if you never put a lot of power on it (i.e. push it up the hills).
But in the end, the Alivio and related low(est) end stuff is just not made for any kind of more than casual use: it will wear down very quickly and end in a costly repair.
I totally don't agree with this. My regular cycling trip goes both across the albis and the buechenegg pass, two 350 meter climbs. My Alivio stuff works perfectly fine for 10000 km at which point the sprockets are so worn the chain jumps over it when really pushing on the pedals. The key is to keep the cables in good condition, the few issues I had with Alivio always came down to rusty or frayed bowden cables. Keep in mind I'm an (electro) engineer with good mechanical skills...
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 20.05.2011, 12:44
Phil_MCR's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 14,989
Groaned at 295 Times in 199 Posts
Thanked 19,055 Times in 8,017 Posts
Phil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
So you completely ignored all the advice given then...
not at all it is one of the bikes recommended above and it has no front suspension!
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Phil_MCR for this useful post:
  #48  
Old 20.05.2011, 13:00
Salsa_Lover
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Buying a bike

this thread is making baby Jesus cry...
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #49  
Old 22.05.2011, 17:40
Phil_MCR's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 14,989
Groaned at 295 Times in 199 Posts
Thanked 19,055 Times in 8,017 Posts
Phil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Just went out on my bike for the 2nd time. I did a 38km trip around Schaffhausen. The weather was great and it was a fun way to burn up those alcoholic calories.

Someone seriously needs to design a comfortable saddle. I'm not sure I can have children anymore...
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 22.05.2011, 17:51
adrianlondon's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 9,131
Groaned at 170 Times in 153 Posts
Thanked 25,643 Times in 6,892 Posts
adrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Saddles are very personal - what suits one person may not suit another. Also, a very slight adjustment of the angle (up or down) can make a big difference. Maybe tilt yours down a little bit.

Or peddle harder so you're not just sitting with your full weight on the seat all the time.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank adrianlondon for this useful post:
  #51  
Old 23.05.2011, 07:11
Carlos R's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Roundn'about Basel
Posts: 7,231
Groaned at 105 Times in 95 Posts
Thanked 9,934 Times in 4,178 Posts
Carlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
Just went out on my bike for the 2nd time. I did a 38km trip around Schaffhausen. The weather was great and it was a fun way to burn up those alcoholic calories.

Someone seriously needs to design a comfortable saddle. I'm not sure I can have children anymore...
Either someone lied about not having suspension, or those 1000 CHF bikes are 50 CHF for the bike and 950 CHF for a comfortable saddle.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 23.05.2011, 08:51
BasP72's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Adliswil (close to Zurich)
Posts: 1,932
Groaned at 89 Times in 43 Posts
Thanked 1,785 Times in 852 Posts
BasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
Just went out on my bike for the 2nd time. I did a 38km trip around Schaffhausen. The weather was great and it was a fun way to burn up those alcoholic calories.

Someone seriously needs to design a comfortable saddle. I'm not sure I can have children anymore...
Get one of these, they're the best:

Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 23.05.2011, 09:35
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Vaud
Posts: 4,518
Groaned at 491 Times in 320 Posts
Thanked 4,099 Times in 1,952 Posts
CorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
Get one of these, they're the best:


no, no, no!!

Several issues associated with sitting on traditional bicycle saddles have been identified.
Crotch pressure
Erectile dysfunction and genital numbness
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_saddle
The guy needs something like that:

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/ebwP...c003138c003276
Example:


PS: That's not the "budget killer" it's only about 30-40 CHF.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 23.05.2011, 11:24
pagl57's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fribourg
Posts: 239
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 98 Times in 62 Posts
pagl57 is considered knowledgeablepagl57 is considered knowledgeablepagl57 is considered knowledgeable
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post

no, no, no!!

Several issues associated with sitting on traditional bicycle saddles have been identified.
Crotch pressure
Erectile dysfunction and genital numbness
A 5 mn ice cold shower on the crotch and genitals are in general sufficient to bring back life ...
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 23.05.2011, 11:53
Phil_MCR's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 14,989
Groaned at 295 Times in 199 Posts
Thanked 19,055 Times in 8,017 Posts
Phil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
Get one of these, they're the best:

but what is the point of having the long bit sticking out at the front? it's almost as if it was put there to stab you in the nads.

why not just cut away the front 1/2 of the saddle?
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 23.05.2011, 12:19
BasP72's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Adliswil (close to Zurich)
Posts: 1,932
Groaned at 89 Times in 43 Posts
Thanked 1,785 Times in 852 Posts
BasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
but what is the point of having the long bit sticking out at the front? it's almost as if it was put there to stab you in the nads.

why not just cut away the front 1/2 of the saddle?
Well they do make a shorter version for women. I think it has to be long to allow enough stretch for the leather ?
I got one with the springs on my MTB, I can to 4 hour rides on it without getting saddle-sore so, if your saddle gives you problems try one. Not cheap though at chf 120....

http://www.veloplus.ch/AlleProdukte/...vonBROOKS.aspx
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 23.05.2011, 14:05
Salsa_Lover
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post

no, no, no!!

Several issues associated with sitting on traditional bicycle saddles have been identified.
Crotch pressure
Erectile dysfunction and genital numbness
That's because many cyclists, sportive and recreational ones are basically doing it wrong.

first

You should sit on it gently, distributing your weight on your hands, seat and feet; and not to lie your full weight on the saddle.

for that reason is very important to have a proper fit, proper fit means that there is a balance between the three contact points.

many city bikers prefer to setup their bikes in a way they can step on the floor when stoping while still being seated on the saddle. This ensures that they can wait on the red lights for example resting one foot on the floor.

This while can be practical is very wrong, as you have for that to setup the saddle very low and then your legs would never be extended in the right way and then offering little support for your weight.

Also many bikes are setup for comfort with the handlebars very high, while this could be good for comfort and be practical to have a better visibility in traffic also that position offers little support for your body on your hands.

Those two bad fitting issues will then put much more weight on your seat.

now the main problem:

second

Having a proper bike fit means you would have more leg extension and handlebars that are lower than your seat, this would distribute the weight better and place your mass center properly over the center of the bike, but of course needs that you bend down.

Now here lies the main problem. a lot of riders bend down in the wrong way.

I will try to explain on my bad english.

You should sit properly on the saddle, that means your lower back should be as perpendicular possible to the saddle, in the same way you would sit on a chair or a bench, particularly harder ones. you would be sitting on your seatbones.

Then you should bend your back forward, resting your weight on the handlebars, and pressing on your feet. in that way you are distributing your weight on the 3 contact points.

Now read again. I said bend your back, what many cyclists do is that they got to a lower position by flexing their bodies using the hip joints as hinges.

The problem with this wrong way of geting into a lower position is that then you will be pressing your genitals into the saddle.

and this is what causes all those problems.

So your back to be properly seated should be perpendicular to the saddle on the lower back and then your back bent forward in a curved shape. If you do so properly, even when you have your back very low, there will be some free space and air between your genitals and saddle.

The wrong way is to seat and hinge the full body, with your back is straight and then pressing the genitals down into the saddle.


If you are sitting wrong this will create problems, even if you use gel or cutaway saddles that provide some temporary relief, at the end you will have problems anyway.
Reply With Quote
The following 8 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #58  
Old 23.05.2011, 16:08
Carlos R's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Roundn'about Basel
Posts: 7,231
Groaned at 105 Times in 95 Posts
Thanked 9,934 Times in 4,178 Posts
Carlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
That's because many cyclists, sportive and recreational ones are basically doing it wrong.

<long explanation sniped>
As easy as riding a bike... eh?
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 23.05.2011, 16:15
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Vaud
Posts: 4,518
Groaned at 491 Times in 320 Posts
Thanked 4,099 Times in 1,952 Posts
CorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond reputeCorsebouTheReturn has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Quote:
View Post
That's because many cyclists, sportive and recreational ones are basically doing it wrong.
Ok so if I understood properly one has to ride the bike like that:



Is that the proper position?
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank CorsebouTheReturn for this useful post:
  #60  
Old 23.05.2011, 16:51
Carlos R's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Roundn'about Basel
Posts: 7,231
Groaned at 105 Times in 95 Posts
Thanked 9,934 Times in 4,178 Posts
Carlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Buying a bike

Any views on fixed gear/singlespeed bikes?

Am thinking of a fixed gear bikes to travel across farm tracks and tarmac roads for around 5 km as part of my commute.

The idea of a fixed gear/simple bike is appealing... but they ain't cheap, even though they lack half the kit of other bikes...

Also, anyone know of good - i.e. reputable and helpful - bike shops around Basel?

Last edited by Carlos R; 23.05.2011 at 17:05.
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Buying a bike in Germany. Jose1984 Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 32 08.06.2010 10:54
Shipping bike from US vs. buying in ZH area Chili Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 16 02.03.2010 18:45
buying second hand bike in Basel mlindblom Transportation/driving 0 24.02.2008 21:48
Buying a used bike in Bern Aptsagi Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 2 12.02.2008 21:37
buying new marathon bike Dr D Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 15 03.12.2007 10:13


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 18:43.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0