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Old 03.03.2014, 21:11
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Cylinder Repair

I have a Ford Transit truck I suspect has a couple or more cylinders blown, I want to either repair myself, or take it to a DIY garage to get the assistance of another mechanic to help. How much work is this job in terms of hours to remove the head and replace the cylinders? And when I am in there, should I do any other work? I know it is a vague question, but I am looking for vague answers as well.


Is it something if I invite a friend or two over, load up on Anchor and pizza we should be able to get it done over the weekend, or...any comments are fine. I looked it up online, but not sure I am confident enough to take it on.


Any ball park figure of the cost of the repair either DIY or at a garage? I am getting quotes as we speak, but I want to know my options. Thanks.
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Old 03.03.2014, 21:30
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Re: Cylinder Repair

In this day and age, isn't it more time and cost effective, just to replace the whole block, with a recon'd one?
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Old 03.03.2014, 21:31
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Re: Cylinder Repair

So how do you know it is the rings / cylinder or valves / seats?

1. Take an old spark plug, remove the porcelain, so you have a metal piece with a hole.
2. Braze or weld or Araldite, a Schröder car tyre valve to the metal hole.
3. Fit this adapter into the spark plug hole for cylinder one, tighten.
4. Jack up the car at one drive wheel, so you can turn the wheel. Put the car in gear.
5. Turn car wheel until the piston is highest on first cylinder. This requires a bit of practice, and as you turn the wheel you can feel the compression on cylinders 2, 3 & 4, remember these positions, and so you should know when the first piston is at top dead center.
6. Fix the wheel to stop it rotating with 2 bricks.
7. Apply compressed air to the Schröder valve. There should be no leaks!
8. If you hear air leaking out into the exhaust, the exhaust valve is bad.
9. Remove the air filter, listen to the carburetor for air leaks on the inlet valve.
10. Listen to the rocker valve gear, air leaking past the piston and into the crank case will be heard around the valve rocker gear.
11. Repeat for the other cylinders.

It is obviously easier with a friend to help you, but it is possible alone, if you have the air line nearby!

This really works. I had a 4 cylinder Renault 1.8 liter engine, and quickly diagnosed a leaking exhaust valve. I bought 4 exhaust valves removed the head, and fixed the engine in the road!

If you have a garage and all the tools and parts, and the knowledge! Inside one day to fix the valves is achievable. But do the research first!
http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_...orkshop+manual

I don't know the engine, if it has wet liners, you can replace the cylinders. If not you need to take out the block and get it machined.
If you are replacing pistons, always replace the crankshaft bearings.

It's probably easier / cheaper to drive it to Poland or Czech republic and get it repaired there!
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Old 03.03.2014, 22:31
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Re: Cylinder Repair

My very honest suggestion: do NOT do this yourself if you haven't done something remotely similar before. It's not an easy job, lots of stuff to watch out for depending on engine, lots of materials depending on damage, lots of details to know when putting everything back...just don't!
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Old 03.03.2014, 23:07
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Re: Cylinder Repair

Bring it down here, I have a leak-down tester (among other stuff).

Tom
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Old 03.03.2014, 23:18
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Re: Cylinder Repair

Before u do anything do a pressure check and go from there. Whats reasoning behind your thoughts?
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Old 04.03.2014, 00:17
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Re: Cylinder Repair

Quote:
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So how do you know it is the rings / cylinder or valves / seats?

1. Take an old spark plug, remove the porcelain, so you have a metal piece with a hole.
2. Braze or weld or Araldite, a Schröder car tyre valve to the metal hole.
3. Fit this adapter into the spark plug hole for cylinder one, tighten.
4. Jack up the car at one drive wheel, so you can turn the wheel. Put the car in gear.
5. Turn car wheel until the piston is highest on first cylinder. This requires a bit of practice, and as you turn the wheel you can feel the compression on cylinders 2, 3 & 4, remember these positions, and so you should know when the first piston is at top dead center.
6. Fix the wheel to stop it rotating with 2 bricks.
7. Apply compressed air to the Schröder valve. There should be no leaks!
8. If you hear air leaking out into the exhaust, the exhaust valve is bad.
9. Remove the air filter, listen to the carburetor for air leaks on the inlet valve.
10. Listen to the rocker valve gear, air leaking past the piston and into the crank case will be heard around the valve rocker gear.
11. Repeat for the other cylinders.

It is obviously easier with a friend to help you, but it is possible alone, if you have the air line nearby!

This really works. I had a 4 cylinder Renault 1.8 liter engine, and quickly diagnosed a leaking exhaust valve. I bought 4 exhaust valves removed the head, and fixed the engine in the road!

If you have a garage and all the tools and parts, and the knowledge! Inside one day to fix the valves is achievable. But do the research first!
http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_...orkshop+manual

I don't know the engine, if it has wet liners, you can replace the cylinders. If not you need to take out the block and get it machined.
If you are replacing pistons, always replace the crankshaft bearings.

It's probably easier / cheaper to drive it to Poland or Czech republic and get it repaired there!
How much cheaper? As it turns out, I will be in the Poland neighborhood soon.
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Old 04.03.2014, 00:18
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Re: Cylinder Repair

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Before u do anything do a pressure check and go from there. Whats reasoning behind your thoughts?
I drove it up a hill and there was no force at all getting up it, no matter how much acceleration I tried to give it. There is knocking on the engine, but I think that is from sitting.
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