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Old 08.02.2015, 13:56
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Biennial medical recertification of drivers from age 70

The February number of Générations Plus includes an article on the implementation of new controls on over-70 drivers (examination by a medical doctor who has undergone special training and who is on an approved list). http://www.uniset.ca/misc/gen.pdf

Compare this to the UK system of self-certification by over-70 drivers every 3 years: https://www.gov.uk/renew-driving-licence-at-70 and the US and Canada system: renewal every 4 or 8 years with new photo taken, and depending on state/province perhaps a vision test; but enforcement of competence norms is left up to the police, who may require a re-test: http://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/det...ior/senior_top (California)

In Vaud at least, the maximum discretionary extension of the time to take a test allowed by the Service des automobiles et de la navigation is about 30 days after one's 70th birthday, leaving potentially stranded the Swiss driver who happens to be abroad at the time. Unless s/he happens to have a foreign license as well which might be usable up to the Swiss frontier.
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Old 08.02.2015, 14:48
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Re: Biennial medical recertification of drivers from age 70

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In Vaud at least, the maximum discretionary extension of the time to take a test allowed by the Service des automobiles et de la navigation is about 30 days after one's 70th birthday, leaving potentially stranded the Swiss driver who happens to be abroad at the time. Unless s/he happens to have a foreign license as well which might be usable up to the Swiss frontier.

There's nothing stopping you doing before you go on such an "extended holiday"

Whatever rule you put in place there will always be some rather obscure reason why it won't be suitable for 100% of the population.

The idea is it is suitable for 99% of people and the remaining 1% have to find a solution, like doing before holidays or writting a very simple letter to SAN (Service des Autos et Navigation) and requesting a delay with a reason for the delay.

They've really tried to make it easy for normal people
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Old 11.02.2015, 11:58
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Re: Biennial medical recertification of drivers from age 70

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There's nothing stopping you doing before you go on such an "extended holiday"

Whatever rule you put in place there will always be some rather obscure reason why it won't be suitable for 100% of the population.

The idea is it is suitable for 99% of people and the remaining 1% have to find a solution, like doing before holidays or writting a very simple letter to SAN (Service des Autos et Navigation) and requesting a delay with a reason for the delay.

They've really tried to make it easy for normal people
I brought the issue up not by way of complaint but because it caught a few people by surprise and being forewarned is good. Only some European countries require renewal (and/or testing) of senior drivers.

This is not the only anomaly that has caught me out: I had a UK-reg car in Switzerland stored in my closed garage. There is an EU law that states a car not taxed (or equivalent) in its home EU Member State can not be driven in any other. It could be driven (under specific conditions, including non-residence) in Switzerland but not in France. It could be driven from Dover to London (or anywhere in the UK) if there was a pre-scheduled MOT. How to get it to Dover other than (1) towing, (2) freight on the back of a lorry, (3) dealer plates (not possible in the UK as transport plates can only be placed on a car owned by the dealer: this makes little sense to me but it's what DLVA told me, perhaps incorrectly; BBC Radio 4 had a programme on transporters ("trade plate" drivers): http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b021406q ).

(In the end we junked the car. Possible in Switzerland (we gave it to a dealer), but not in France: I wrecked a UK car once (tire blowout) and it had to be towed back to the UK for junking. So my insurer said; and surprisingly they were nice to me when they discovered it was diplomatic and not taxed or duty-paid anywhere. But that was years ago.)

Returning to the over-70s medical: I linked to the Génération article (on line for 15 days from the posting) because it has new information. And BTW the medical can be taken 2 months before, or with permission 1 month after, the 70th birthday. So what if one is on a long holiday in Canada? (Fortunately I have a Québec licence too. But not everybody does.)

Again: this is not a complaint. As forum posts are searchable forever on Google and other search engines, it's intended for anyone who cares to know. Usually I link to legal references but European Law (search for "Driving Licence Directive" and "Directives and regulations - motor vehicles") and Swiss law on vehicles and licensing are easy enough to find.

The fact is that people get away with a lot of stuff. The Swiss cantons will send a letter to the last known address of driver licence holders approaching age 70. There is a penalty for failure to submit to a medical test or turn in one's licence. In the EU a person living in another Member State is not obliged to exchange his or her licence, or even notify of a change in address to another country, until age 70. At that point the UK (and perhaps other countries) require a foreign EU licence to be exchanged and the driver's health self-certified. No penalty for not -- unless you get caught driving. And with the abolition of tax discs and CCTVs (including portables) everywhere, and the collating of vehicle and driver information (Chris Huhne, pay attention) there is a high risk of getting caught, eventually.

A significant percentage of drivers whose licences are suspended or cancelled drive anyway. More's the pity: in some countries (USA) that invalidates their insurance. In other countries the insurer (or the country's Motor Insurance Bureau) has to pay, but can in principle sue their policyholder. (Indeed the Bureau has to pay even if the registration number plates are fake or stolen, so long as they are from another Green Card country. (Good luck collecting from some countries, but that's another story.))

Who knows this stuff? Who cares?

And, hey, who are "normal" people? Especially on this forum, given it's intended for those with a foreign connection.

Last edited by Potrzebie; 11.02.2015 at 12:22.
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